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By Lynn Van Matre and Lynn Van Matre,Chicago Tribune | January 2, 1991
When it comes to members of the vegetable kingdom, there are the glamorous aristocrats -- artichokes and asparagus come to mind -- then there are the humbler types -- parsnips, turnips, beets and rutabagas.It's hard to get more "down to earth" than roots, bulbs and tubers. While their green, leafy tops can make good eating, their real bounty is hidden below ground, where the fleshy, edible roots grow to maturity surrounded by soil.Like the earthy potato, sweet potato and onion, root vegetables generally are low in calories and cost, high in flavor and nutritional value and can stand up well to long periods of storage.
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By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2013
I'd like to grow carrots, but I hear it's tricky. Any tips? Because carrots are roots that need to push through soil, having light loose soil is a big determiner of success. For carrots, a depth of 12 inches is ideal. Add compost to your soil structure. It is the Year of the Root Crop on Grow It Eat It, our all-vegetables. all-the-time site. Find us at our new url: extension.umd.edu/hgic. Our online newsletter starts off the year with a great article providing many tips for growing root crops in Maryland.
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By Elaine Strong and Elaine Strong,Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph | February 17, 1993
Joining black beans, pasta and other folk foods, root vegetables have made their way into the kitchens of gourmet cooks.In those kitchens, carrots, parsnips, turnips, rutabagas, celery root and beets are being sauteed, scalloped and honey-baked, drizzled with lemon-dill butter, bathed in wine sauces and sprinkled with toasted pine nuts.Gourmet cooks have accepted these earthy vegetables with very good reason. They're packed with nutrition, low in fat, high in fiber and robust in flavor.Carrots are probably the most popular and versatile root vegetable.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | February 25, 2009
Celery root is awfully ugly, but exceptionally tasty. It's a winter vegetable that looks like a softball that was left in a moist basement and sprouted hair. It has a hide thicker than a two-term congressman. It is also known as celeriac. If you get past its bug-ugly superficialities and use a sharp knife to scrape off its skin - it laughs at vegetable peelers - celery root delivers some pleasing and novel flavors. One flavor is similar to that of celery, its distant cousin. While celery is long, green and supple, celeriac is round, dense and stubby.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | November 25, 2001
My friends know that I am forever trying new recipes, so it was not unusual that a colleague with whom I was dining recently mentioned a new restaurant where she had enjoyed a delicious meal of simple yet beautifully prepared dishes. I began to salivate as she described the offerings of the Peerless Restaurant in Ashland, Ore., and asked my lunch partner, who has a finely tuned palate, to send me a menu and a few recipes that the chef, Stu Stein, had shared with her. Although all the recipes were tempting, I was most enthusiastic about a side dish called Caramelized Root Vegetables.
NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS and ERICA MARCUS,NEWSDAY | October 26, 2005
One of my challenges as a new bride in 1957 was learning how to cook fresh vegetables. Some recipes said to cover with cold water and some mentioned hot water. My mother told me that vegetables grown underground (now called root vegetables) get covered with cold water and vegetables that are grown above the ground get started in hot water. According to Harold McGee, dean of American food-scientists, your mother was absolutely correct. McGee, author of On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen (Scribner, 2004, $40)
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By Nina Simonds and Nina Simonds,Contributing Writer Los Angeles Times Syndicate | October 31, 1993
Fresh Chinese vegetables used to be a rarity in American supermarkets. Bean sprouts came in cans and snow peas were only available in frozen food sections.Times have changed.Today, most well-stocked markets offer a variety of Asian produce. Full heads of leafy Napa cabbage are flanked by dark green bok choy. There are fresh snow peas, ginger root, water chestnuts and bean sprouts. Finally, mainstream America is being introduced to a diverse selection of fresh Chinese vegetables.The Chinese classify vegetables into three main categories: root, leafy and fruit.
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By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1996
Once humble cottage fare, root vegetables are suddenly climbing out of the cellar and into haute cuisine.Onions, garlic, parsnips, turnips, carrots, taro, shallots, sweet potatoes -- those are just some of the "underground" vegetables trendy chefs are using to sauce a fish, create old-fashioned French-style dishes without the butter and cream, and spark favorite foods with extra flavor."
NEWS
By Sandra Pinckney | October 12, 2008
Autumn is my favorite time of year. I love the changing leaves, the cool temperatures, decorating with pumpkins and having a wide variety of vegetables in season. Root vegetables like squash, rutabagas, turnips, carrots, sweet potatoes and beets are all at their peak now. They not only are plentiful, but are powerhouses of nutrients. Take beets, for instance. They are loaded with iron, potassium, calcium and zinc. I know beets don't make it on most lists of favorite foods, but I grew up eating them.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | October 26, 2003
The aunt for whom I am named has been an inveterate hostess for more than 50 years. As a youngster, I loved to visit her home, where the dining table was routinely set with fresh flowers and pressed linens, and there was always a mouth-watering spread of delectable food. What I remember best, though, is how warm and gracious my aunt was. Never anxious or stressed, she planned her meals carefully so she would have plenty of time to talk to everyone while entertaining. Next week this charming woman, now an octogenarian, is coming with her daughter to my house for a few days.
NEWS
By Sandra Pinckney | October 12, 2008
Autumn is my favorite time of year. I love the changing leaves, the cool temperatures, decorating with pumpkins and having a wide variety of vegetables in season. Root vegetables like squash, rutabagas, turnips, carrots, sweet potatoes and beets are all at their peak now. They not only are plentiful, but are powerhouses of nutrients. Take beets, for instance. They are loaded with iron, potassium, calcium and zinc. I know beets don't make it on most lists of favorite foods, but I grew up eating them.
NEWS
By Sandra Pinckney | October 7, 2007
When I was growing up, dinnertime was the most important time of the day. Table manners were strictly enforced. No hats, no T-shirts, no elbows on the table and absolutely no television. My father sat at one end of the table, my mother at the other. My two brothers, sister and I sat in between. In the early years, dinner conversations revolved around school and friends. As we got older, we talked about world events and politics. At the table, we were learning how to present our ideas, how to defend them and how to do so in a respectful manner.
NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS and ERICA MARCUS,NEWSDAY | October 26, 2005
One of my challenges as a new bride in 1957 was learning how to cook fresh vegetables. Some recipes said to cover with cold water and some mentioned hot water. My mother told me that vegetables grown underground (now called root vegetables) get covered with cold water and vegetables that are grown above the ground get started in hot water. According to Harold McGee, dean of American food-scientists, your mother was absolutely correct. McGee, author of On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen (Scribner, 2004, $40)
NEWS
By Elinor Klivans and Elinor Klivans,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 20, 2004
I always feel like the Good Witch of the North when I'm making soup. As I stir the pot, I know that I am going to end up with something good. It is OK to cook soup for a few minutes more or less and it will still turn out fine. Out of an ingredient? That seldom makes a difference. Make it a day ahead and reheat it or maybe even serve it cold. If someone suddenly shows up for dinner, stretch it by just adding an extra cup of broth. This is about as relaxed a meal as you can plan, yet a big bowl of soup served with bread makes a most satisfying meal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2003
Whether it's turkey and stuffing for 20 or tofu and veggies for two that you'll be making this Thanksgiving, chances are you'll have to go out for groceries. But you don't have to just share the holiday spending - er, spirit - with the area's bustling supermarket chains and massive commercial food marts. You can spread the love to your local farmers and mom-and-pop growers, too. The Baltimore Farmers' Market is a good place to start. Located under the Jones Falls Expressway at Holliday and Saratoga streets, the weekly, Sunday-morning bazaar abounds with fresh fruits, vegetables and homemade goodies that were produced in Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2003
It seems like such a wholesome undertaking: tending your own little urban garden filled with fresh vegetables and herbs. But some of those homegrown plants might contain potentially dangerous levels of lead, according to a new study of Chicago residential gardens. The greatest hazard was associated with leafy green vegetables and herbs. Researchers found traces of the toxic metal in some of the plants' leaves - the part people normally eat. Exposure to lead causes a variety of health problems, particularly in children.
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By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 18, 1996
Men complain to me constantly that they'd love to eat more vegetables, but just don't know how to cook them. In my continuing drive to extend men's life expectancy to equal women's, I've tapped a couple of cookbooks for ideal recipes. Each is flavorful, easy, and healthful (yes, it can be done!). Even beginner cooks will come off looking like pros with these vegetable dishes that turn lean meat, poultry or fish into a complete, well-balanced dinner.If this is too complicated for you, most vegetables taste great if you just wash, peel and eat.Oven-barbecued root vegetablesMakes 2 servings1 1/4 pounds root vegetables (carrots, onion, potatoes, sweet potatoes, turnips)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2003
Whether it's turkey and stuffing for 20 or tofu and veggies for two that you'll be making this Thanksgiving, chances are you'll have to go out for groceries. But you don't have to just share the holiday spending - er, spirit - with the area's bustling supermarket chains and massive commercial food marts. You can spread the love to your local farmers and mom-and-pop growers, too. The Baltimore Farmers' Market is a good place to start. Located under the Jones Falls Expressway at Holliday and Saratoga streets, the weekly, Sunday-morning bazaar abounds with fresh fruits, vegetables and homemade goodies that were produced in Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | October 26, 2003
The aunt for whom I am named has been an inveterate hostess for more than 50 years. As a youngster, I loved to visit her home, where the dining table was routinely set with fresh flowers and pressed linens, and there was always a mouth-watering spread of delectable food. What I remember best, though, is how warm and gracious my aunt was. Never anxious or stressed, she planned her meals carefully so she would have plenty of time to talk to everyone while entertaining. Next week this charming woman, now an octogenarian, is coming with her daughter to my house for a few days.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | November 25, 2001
My friends know that I am forever trying new recipes, so it was not unusual that a colleague with whom I was dining recently mentioned a new restaurant where she had enjoyed a delicious meal of simple yet beautifully prepared dishes. I began to salivate as she described the offerings of the Peerless Restaurant in Ashland, Ore., and asked my lunch partner, who has a finely tuned palate, to send me a menu and a few recipes that the chef, Stu Stein, had shared with her. Although all the recipes were tempting, I was most enthusiastic about a side dish called Caramelized Root Vegetables.
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