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FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | June 7, 1998
Some motifs are so appealing they show up year after year on home accessories - kittens and dogs, cows and pigs, flowers and fruit. But every now and then a new one crops up and takes the design world by storm. Last year bees and dragonflies swarmed all over linens and glassware. This year some of the most appealing home items feature roosters.It seems to be a spillover from the recent popularity of French country decor and accessories, where roosters are a recurrent motif. The French consider the rooster a symbol of their national pride.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2013
For the Pasadena Theatre Company, the recent opening of the musical "Annie" at the Chesapeake Arts Center was a homecoming celebration. The show marks the first Pasadena Theatre and Chesapeake Arts partnership, but the two share a rich past - Pasadena was the first company to perform an extended run at Chesapeake's 800-seat theater with its 2001 production of "Camelot. " Twelve years later, the troupe delivers another show with a large and talented cast in "Annie," taking its rightful place on Chesapeake's big stage.
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NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2011
Anybody besides me wondering about that giant rooster in West Baltimore? If you live in the area of West Franklin Street and North Franklintown Road, or drive through it, as many commuters do on their way to and from downtown, you know the one. A huge, sketchlike image of the bird appeared a few weeks ago on the side of a boarded-up rowhouse at 406 N. Franklintown, across from the Hess station. Unusual graffiti to say the least, even if the rooster hadn't been wearing a leather jacket and cradling what appeared to be the head of the crucified Jesus . Perhaps owing to the charcoal-drawing style, or the bumpy canvas provided by the weathered rowhouse, the picture had the appearance of something that had been there for years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2011
Alonso's in Roland Park is an unpretentious restaurant in a pretentious part of the city. Since 1931, it's been serving modest food and good beer to much acclaim and many satisfied customers. It hasn't changed one bit over the years. Well over three-quarters full and bustling is how we found Alonso's on a Wednesday night. A relaxed crowd of older patrons, families and couples filled the seats and booths. The missing tiles in the ceiling suggested that Alonso's is renovating (it's not)
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Evening Sun Staff | December 19, 1990
LEONA BOWLING calls her rooster a watch chicken ''because he makes more racket over a strange noise than my dogs do.''Prissy is the apple of her eye, she says, ''because he is so unusual. I never knew a chicken could be so smart.''He follows me like a dog, and if I'm walking out front and Prissy wants my attention or wants me to go faster, he'll fly up against my back over and over to push me on. If I call the dogs, Logan and Molly, he won't respond until he hears his own name, then he comes faster than the dogs.
NEWS
By Andy Newman and Andy Newman,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 30, 2002
NEW YORK - Behind a chain-link fence in the lush green crescent known as Grand Army Plaza in Brooklyn, a four-note cry pierces the softness of dawn. Across the street in the apartments that line Plaza Street West, sleepers toss in their beds and smile to themselves, or curse quietly, or both. Day is here. Many dawns ago - most residents say a month or two; city animal-control officials say a year - a handsome, rust-maned, greenish-black rooster took up residence in the enclosed greensward that crowns the main entrance to Prospect Park.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 23, 2003
You know how someone will talk about a great little restaurant they found in Europe? "... Maybe in Rome or Prague. The owner greets you personally, there are a couple of waiters. They cook things fresh for you, and you remember it and you tell your friends," elaborates chef Mark Schek. "Now, you don't have to buy a plane ticket," he announces. Schek is hoping you will now have that experience at The Rooster Cafe - the new restaurant he and partner Ali Shirvan have just opened in the Columbia area.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 18, 2003
Howard County has a new restaurant to crow about. The Rooster Cafe opened Sept. 9 in the Lark Brown Shopping Center, off Old Waterloo Road in Elkridge. Chef and owner Mark Schek says the menu features organic ingredients that can make the difference between average and excellent cuisine. "The quality of organic foods is better," said Schek, a member of the Chef's Collaborative, a Boston-based organization that promotes sustainable agriculture. "There are no chemicals, and you know it's fresh because with organic foods the produce must move quickly.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2004
PANG THRUK, Thailand - In a village where generations of farmers have raised chickens, people ordinarily might scoff at the idea of remembering one particular rooster. But they are unlikely to forget the rooster that a 6-year-old boy, Captan Boonmanut, received last month as a gift from a favorite aunt, a bird that contributed to the boy's death and a new, worldwide health alert. Captan had cradled the rooster in his arms. The boy's uncle had culled it from a brood of fighting cocks because the bird seemed too big for anything other than a hungry household's next meal, and it also seemed too sick.
NEWS
By Lisa Kawata and Lisa Kawata,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 14, 2004
Chef Mark Schek not only wants to fill your stomach -- but also wants to touch your soul. "There has to be something that happens when you eat food. It should elicit a response," said Schek, the chef and co-owner of The Rooster CafM-i in Elkridge. Having his own restaurant gives him the opportunity to give customers what he thinks they deserve -- a beautifully crafted meal that is prepared with fresh and natural ingredients. He even makes his own ice cream. "When all the details are right in the meal -- the taste of the food, the pace of the service -- it's a chance to go beyond yourself," Schek said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | July 11, 2011
The street artist known as Gaia, whose image of a leather-clad rooster cradling the head of John the Baptist had me questioning my eyesight and sanity last winter, has been unmasked -- in a way that proves no good deed goes unpunished. Gaia is trying to help the Edgar Allan Poe House, which is in danger of closing because the city has cut off funding. He has donated 100 limited-edition prints of "The Raven (Forevermore), 2011," which will be sold for $400 apiece unframed, $600 framed.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2011
Anybody besides me wondering about that giant rooster in West Baltimore? If you live in the area of West Franklin Street and North Franklintown Road, or drive through it, as many commuters do on their way to and from downtown, you know the one. A huge, sketchlike image of the bird appeared a few weeks ago on the side of a boarded-up rowhouse at 406 N. Franklintown, across from the Hess station. Unusual graffiti to say the least, even if the rooster hadn't been wearing a leather jacket and cradling what appeared to be the head of the crucified Jesus . Perhaps owing to the charcoal-drawing style, or the bumpy canvas provided by the weathered rowhouse, the picture had the appearance of something that had been there for years.
NEWS
By Lisa Kawata and Lisa Kawata,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 14, 2004
Chef Mark Schek not only wants to fill your stomach -- but also wants to touch your soul. "There has to be something that happens when you eat food. It should elicit a response," said Schek, the chef and co-owner of The Rooster CafM-i in Elkridge. Having his own restaurant gives him the opportunity to give customers what he thinks they deserve -- a beautifully crafted meal that is prepared with fresh and natural ingredients. He even makes his own ice cream. "When all the details are right in the meal -- the taste of the food, the pace of the service -- it's a chance to go beyond yourself," Schek said.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2004
The sandwiches and salads and hot dogs are a hot commodity. So are the meatball subs and, for that matter, just about anything else at Rich Waxler's Blue Rooster Cafe. No matter that Waxler's joint is as far from a traditional restaurant as you can get, or that his more aptly described food stand is jammed into a corner of an already crowded building - Howard County's old circuit courthouse. Seven months after he set up shop, business is booming, and county and court officials, who struggled for years to find a vendor who could make a go of the tricky courthouse site, are cheering his good luck.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2004
PANG THRUK, Thailand - In a village where generations of farmers have raised chickens, people ordinarily might scoff at the idea of remembering one particular rooster. But they are unlikely to forget the rooster that a 6-year-old boy, Captan Boonmanut, received last month as a gift from a favorite aunt, a bird that contributed to the boy's death and a new, worldwide health alert. Captan had cradled the rooster in his arms. The boy's uncle had culled it from a brood of fighting cocks because the bird seemed too big for anything other than a hungry household's next meal, and it also seemed too sick.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | November 2, 2003
Every chef at some point in his career must dream of opening a little cafe with a few tables where he has total creative control and can produce the kind of food he loves. For most, reality sets in, and they get a job at somebody else's restaurant so they won't have to worry about food costs and hard-to-find help. But Mark Schek has taken the leap and opened the new Rooster Cafe in the Lark Brown shopping center in Elkridge. Schek, a Maryland native and a graduate of the Culinary Institute of America, has worked in prestigious restaurants, but what he wanted was to be at the stove of his own organic and natural foods bistro.
NEWS
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | May 14, 2000
Home design has met with a bit of fowl play. And the culprit is pecking its way onto our welcome mats, into our living rooms, onto our tabletops and into our gardens. Animals and insects take turns as nature mascots in our homes. Over the years, we've embraced geese, butterflies, dragonflies and frogs. This year, roosters rule. "People find roosters very warm and friendly," says Sally Conley, assistant manager of the Kellogg Collections, a home furnishings store in Baltimore. Roosters have been gaining popularity in her shop for about a year.
FEATURES
June 7, 1998
"My favorite book is 'The Valiant Red Rooster.' The author is Eric A. Kimmel. The story is about a rooster whose owner was a kind old lady. They were very poor and had no food. He found a diamond necklace and the sultan wanted it. The sultan took it. The rooster tried many tricks to get it back. The rooster teased him and bothered him until he gave it back. I think this book is really funny.- Eric Stoll, Grade 3Pine Grove Elementary" 'The Cry of the Cat' is a non-stop reading book. The author, R.L. Stine, writes scary books.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 23, 2003
You know how someone will talk about a great little restaurant they found in Europe? "... Maybe in Rome or Prague. The owner greets you personally, there are a couple of waiters. They cook things fresh for you, and you remember it and you tell your friends," elaborates chef Mark Schek. "Now, you don't have to buy a plane ticket," he announces. Schek is hoping you will now have that experience at The Rooster Cafe - the new restaurant he and partner Ali Shirvan have just opened in the Columbia area.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 18, 2003
Howard County has a new restaurant to crow about. The Rooster Cafe opened Sept. 9 in the Lark Brown Shopping Center, off Old Waterloo Road in Elkridge. Chef and owner Mark Schek says the menu features organic ingredients that can make the difference between average and excellent cuisine. "The quality of organic foods is better," said Schek, a member of the Chef's Collaborative, a Boston-based organization that promotes sustainable agriculture. "There are no chemicals, and you know it's fresh because with organic foods the produce must move quickly.
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