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NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | June 23, 2013
Omar Ibrahim, a relative newcomer to Hampden, went to the Roosevelt Park pool for the first time Saturday, and was impressed that it cost only $2 to get in. The next day, Ibrahim came back with his three children - not knowing it was Friends and Family Day, a special pool party for the public. Both the event and admission to the pool were free from 1-3 p.m. Sunday. "Today, we got lucky," said Ibrahim, 45, as he held his pool-drenched son, Lucas, 3, in a towel in his arms. "Still, $2 is a pretty good deal.
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NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | October 1, 2013
A groundbreaking ceremony is scheduled Tuesday for the first phase of a skateboarding park in Hampden. The $180,000 "skatepark," as it is called, will be built within Roosevelt Park on West 36th Street near Falls Road, starting with a 5,000-square-foot concrete bowl for skateboarders, to be constructed by Artisan Skateparks. The skatepark is funded with $90,000 each from the Baltimore City Department of Recreation and Parks and The Skatepark of Baltimore, Inc., a non-profit group that has been working on the project since 2006, according to board president Stephanie Murdock.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2012
The Tony Hawk Foundation has given $25,000 toward the construction of a skateboard park in Roosevelt Park in Hampden. The Skatepark of Baltimore, a nonprofit group dedicated to raising enough money to build a place for area youth to skateboard safely, received one of 12 grants given by the foundation this spring, according to a news release. The group has until the end of May to raise $75,000 in order to get a matching grant from the Baltimore City Department of Recreation and Parks.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | October 1, 2013
Skateboarding enthusiast Stephanie Murdock was 21 when she placed an ad in the Baltimore City Paper in 2004, looking for help in bringing a skate park to Hampden. "This is going to be easy," she thought. Nine years of hard work later, Murdock, now an aide to Baltimore City Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke, basked in accolades from a large crowd of skateboarders, parents and city officials - some of whom she said doubted she would succeed - at a groundbreaking ceremony Tuesday, Oct. 1, behind Roosevelt Park, where a 5,000-square-foot concrete bowl for skateboarding was scheduled to be built starting the next day. Then, Murdock climbed into the seat of a Bobcat on the grassy site at 1221 W. 36th St. and dug up ceremonial dirt like a seasoned construction worker.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun Reporter | October 28, 2007
A little more than a year after a Hampden recreation center reopened after $1.3 million in renovations, the ceiling has partially collapsed, there are cracks in the walls and critics are blaming the problems on shoddy work done by a contractor hired by the city. The situation at Roosevelt Park recreation center became so serious that the auditorium has been closed for about two months because of the danger posed by chunks of falling ceiling. The auditorium's closure has angered many who use the center for community meetings and activities for young people, including dance and karate classes.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun reporter | October 30, 2007
Baltimore parks officials are scheduled to begin repair work this week to fix a partially collapsed ceiling, cracks in walls and a faulty heating and air system at a Hampden recreation center, problems community advocates say stem from a botched $1.3 million renovation of the building last year. The auditorium at Roosevelt Park recreation center has been closed for months after chunks of the ceiling began falling, leading volunteers to demand that the city have the problems fixed. The auditorium's closing has disrupted the schedules of many who use the center for community meetings and after-school activities, including dance, jazz and karate classes.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | October 1, 2013
A groundbreaking ceremony is scheduled Tuesday for the first phase of a skateboarding park in Hampden. The $180,000 "skatepark," as it is called, will be built within Roosevelt Park on West 36th Street near Falls Road, starting with a 5,000-square-foot concrete bowl for skateboarders, to be constructed by Artisan Skateparks. The skatepark is funded with $90,000 each from the Baltimore City Department of Recreation and Parks and The Skatepark of Baltimore, Inc., a non-profit group that has been working on the project since 2006, according to board president Stephanie Murdock.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | October 1, 2013
Skateboarding enthusiast Stephanie Murdock was 21 when she placed an ad in the Baltimore City Paper in 2004, looking for help in bringing a skate park to Hampden. "This is going to be easy," she thought. Nine years of hard work later, Murdock, now an aide to Baltimore City Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke, basked in accolades from a large crowd of skateboarders, parents and city officials - some of whom she said doubted she would succeed - at a groundbreaking ceremony Tuesday, Oct. 1, behind Roosevelt Park, where a 5,000-square-foot concrete bowl for skateboarding was scheduled to be built starting the next day. Then, Murdock climbed into the seat of a Bobcat on the grassy site at 1221 W. 36th St. and dug up ceremonial dirt like a seasoned construction worker.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 13, 2000
For 17 years Jennifer Bishop's photographs appeared every week in the pages of the City Paper, Baltimore's alternative weekly, helping to define the look of the metropolis and its people. Bishop even had her own regular space, which she could fill with any image that pleased her, unfettered by second-guessing editors; she used it to record the quirky moments, sudden epiphanies, visual paradoxes and poetic ironies that define the strangeness of everyday life in this city. Yet oddly, the photographer who chronicled the soul of Baltimore so relentlessly - and lovingly - has never until now had a one-person exhibit of her pictures in the town she has lived and worked in for the past 25 years.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 4, 2013
Baltimore City Councilman Nick Mosby said he is trying to set up a community meeting, possibly next week, to discuss the closing of the Roosevelt Park Recreation Center for up to a month to repair a broken water line. The city Department of Recreation and Parks closed the Roosevelt Park center at Falls Road and West 36th Street on March 28 after the kitchen drainage pipe broke, said spokeswoman Kia McLeod. A sign on the front door says, "Center closed until further notice due to mechanical repair emergencies.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | June 23, 2013
Omar Ibrahim, a relative newcomer to Hampden, went to the Roosevelt Park pool for the first time Saturday, and was impressed that it cost only $2 to get in. The next day, Ibrahim came back with his three children - not knowing it was Friends and Family Day, a special pool party for the public. Both the event and admission to the pool were free from 1-3 p.m. Sunday. "Today, we got lucky," said Ibrahim, 45, as he held his pool-drenched son, Lucas, 3, in a towel in his arms. "Still, $2 is a pretty good deal.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 25, 2013
The Roosevelt Park Recreation Center reopened Wednesday after being closed for about a month because of a broke water pipe. "I missed it," said Gabrielle Barnes, 10, a third grader from Hampden Elementary/Middle School. She was one of 14 children who returned to the center for after-school enrichment activities. Usually, that number is about 25, but some families might not have gotten the message yet that the center was reopen, director Joshua Fissel said. The pipe was repaired at a cost of $10,000, said Kia McLeod, a spokeswoman for the Baltimore City Department of Recreation and Parks.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 4, 2013
Baltimore City Councilman Nick Mosby said he is trying to set up a community meeting, possibly next week, to discuss the closing of the Roosevelt Park Recreation Center for up to a month to repair a broken water line. The city Department of Recreation and Parks closed the Roosevelt Park center at Falls Road and West 36th Street on March 28 after the kitchen drainage pipe broke, said spokeswoman Kia McLeod. A sign on the front door says, "Center closed until further notice due to mechanical repair emergencies.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2012
The Tony Hawk Foundation has given $25,000 toward the construction of a skateboard park in Roosevelt Park in Hampden. The Skatepark of Baltimore, a nonprofit group dedicated to raising enough money to build a place for area youth to skateboard safely, received one of 12 grants given by the foundation this spring, according to a news release. The group has until the end of May to raise $75,000 in order to get a matching grant from the Baltimore City Department of Recreation and Parks.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun reporter | October 30, 2007
Baltimore parks officials are scheduled to begin repair work this week to fix a partially collapsed ceiling, cracks in walls and a faulty heating and air system at a Hampden recreation center, problems community advocates say stem from a botched $1.3 million renovation of the building last year. The auditorium at Roosevelt Park recreation center has been closed for months after chunks of the ceiling began falling, leading volunteers to demand that the city have the problems fixed. The auditorium's closing has disrupted the schedules of many who use the center for community meetings and after-school activities, including dance, jazz and karate classes.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun Reporter | October 28, 2007
A little more than a year after a Hampden recreation center reopened after $1.3 million in renovations, the ceiling has partially collapsed, there are cracks in the walls and critics are blaming the problems on shoddy work done by a contractor hired by the city. The situation at Roosevelt Park recreation center became so serious that the auditorium has been closed for about two months because of the danger posed by chunks of falling ceiling. The auditorium's closure has angered many who use the center for community meetings and activities for young people, including dance and karate classes.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 25, 2013
The Roosevelt Park Recreation Center reopened Wednesday after being closed for about a month because of a broke water pipe. "I missed it," said Gabrielle Barnes, 10, a third grader from Hampden Elementary/Middle School. She was one of 14 children who returned to the center for after-school enrichment activities. Usually, that number is about 25, but some families might not have gotten the message yet that the center was reopen, director Joshua Fissel said. The pipe was repaired at a cost of $10,000, said Kia McLeod, a spokeswoman for the Baltimore City Department of Recreation and Parks.
NEWS
October 4, 2003
Mae (nee Ehrlich), October 2, 2003, wife of the late Frank E., mother of Florence (Rabbi William) Berkowitz, Thelma (the late Lee) Linder, Rabbi Sheldon (Dr. Shulamith) Elster and Toby (the late Rabbi Seymour) Essrog; also survived by 11 grandchildren and 20 great grandchildren. Funeral services were held Friday at Goldsteins' Rosenberg's Raphael-Sacks, Philadelphia. Interment Roosevelt Memorial Park. Contributions may be made to Jewish Theological Seminary, 3080 Broadway, New York, NY 10027.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 13, 2000
For 17 years Jennifer Bishop's photographs appeared every week in the pages of the City Paper, Baltimore's alternative weekly, helping to define the look of the metropolis and its people. Bishop even had her own regular space, which she could fill with any image that pleased her, unfettered by second-guessing editors; she used it to record the quirky moments, sudden epiphanies, visual paradoxes and poetic ironies that define the strangeness of everyday life in this city. Yet oddly, the photographer who chronicled the soul of Baltimore so relentlessly - and lovingly - has never until now had a one-person exhibit of her pictures in the town she has lived and worked in for the past 25 years.
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