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Room Service

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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2013
According to an old song, there's a broken heart for every light on Broadway. There's also a lot of humor to be mined from all that disappointment, all those shattered dreams littering the theater industry, where producers scramble for backers, playwrights dream way too big, and aspiring actors will leap at any opportunity. Whether “Room Service,” the 1937 farce by John Murray and Allen Boretz, is the best comedy to be inspired by this volatile milieu can be debated. The work, which has been given a welcome, if spotty, revival by Vagabond Players, certainly creaks in places.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | June 15, 2013
Ever since President Bill Clinton "did not have sexual relations with that woman, Miss Lewinsky," whatever remains of standards seem to have fallen even lower among people who hold offices and positions once thought to require good behavior and strong moral character. Last year, several Secret Service agents left the agency amid scandal after allegedly engaging the services of prostitutes while advancing a trip to Cartagena, Colombia, for President Barack Obama. A side note: One of the prostitutes, Dania Londono Suarez, wrote a tell-all book about the incident titled "Room Service.
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FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 8, 1997
This is how old and quaint the classic comedy "Room Service" is. At the start of the play, a theatrical producer and his company of 22 actors have been freeloading at a fancy midtown Manhattan hotel for two weeks.And they've racked up a bill of $1,200.The year is 1937 -- when ladies wore hats, when hanging a stuffed elk head on the wall was not politically incorrect, and when Broadway was still hospitable to serious dramas (instead of just musicals).In "Room Service," deadbeat producer Gordon Miller is trying to produce a play he's sure is a hit -- a play with a message, no less.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2013
According to an old song, there's a broken heart for every light on Broadway. There's also a lot of humor to be mined from all that disappointment, all those shattered dreams littering the theater industry, where producers scramble for backers, playwrights dream way too big, and aspiring actors will leap at any opportunity. Whether “Room Service,” the 1937 farce by John Murray and Allen Boretz, is the best comedy to be inspired by this volatile milieu can be debated. The work, which has been given a welcome, if spotty, revival by Vagabond Players, certainly creaks in places.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 4, 2005
With this production of Allen Boretz's and John Murray's zany comic farce Room Service, the folks at 2nd Star chase away any lingering winter blahs. Often dismissed as the Marx Brothers' not-so-funny movie, Room Service began life in 1937 as a Broadway show about the indomitable spirit of theater people who could mount a show back then for a mere $15,000. Charles Maloney, the 2nd Star director, met the challenges of enabling his 14-member cast to bring life to these struggling theater people who employ various strategies to remain hotel-housed and fed while bringing their show to production.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | October 25, 2009
Just a few months after her husband drowned their three children, Amy Castillo found herself standing on top of a mountain during a Christian missionary trip to China, winds whipping, rain pouring down. She asked herself a question: "Can I live with this?" A long time passed before she could honestly answer. The man she once playfully called "sexy thing," who swept her off her feet and quickly became her best friend, had gradually vanished over the past five years. In his place was a manic, suicidal stranger who spent entire nights at Baltimore strip clubs, blew thousands of dollars in wild shopping sprees and accused her of being self-righteous and manipulative.
FEATURES
By Chris Barnett and Chris Barnett,Copley News Service | April 18, 1993
If there were a room service event in the Olympic Games, Hotel Macklowe in New York City would win a gold medal in the bagel-and-blow-dryer race.On a recent visit, the order was placed -- toasted bagel, pot of coffee, glass of OJ -- and a 40-minute wait was quoted. Thirteen minutes later, a waiter arrived with a smile and a tray."That was fast," I said."Have to be fast," he replied, placing the tray on the bed and streaking out the door with a "thank you." No waiting for a signature and a tip.The Macklowe scored again when I ordered a hair dryer from the front desk.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2012
Former Pittsburgh Steelers receiver and longtime Ravens nemesis Hines Ward has a new job as analyst for NBC's "Football Night in America. " But he's still feeling the old "hate" when he comes to Baltimore. Ward, who will be working in Baltimore tonight during the prime-time matchup between the Ravens and New England Patriots, posted this little chronicle on the "hate" he received on his journey to Baltimore for the game. Judging for all the parenthetical "haha's," I'm guessing there's some tongue in cheek from Ward here, but he was a much better receiver than he is a writer, so I am not so sure.
NEWS
By JOE MURRAY | February 8, 1991
Angelina County, Texas. Abuddy of mine who is going through his second bachelorhood recently went to Dallas with a lady friend for the weekend. It is from his first-hand experience that I've been able to glean a wealth of scientific data on the high cost of loving. Remember, you read it here first -- just in time for Valentine's.Q. How much did you pay for the hotel room?A. Well, off-hand I don't remember exactly. Probably more than I ever thought it'd be.Q. One hundred dollars a night?A.
SPORTS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2012
OMAHA, NEB. -- After watching Navy SEALs assault an island of terrorists and then capture a drug smuggler's yacht, Michael Phelps must have viewed his own watery mission as a day at the beach. Phelps bested his own enemies, seven swimmers who would steal a piece of his Olympic action, at the swimming trials here on Thursday night after watching the movie, Act of Valor. The flick stars active member of the elite sea, air and land warriors, known for daring, covert strikes such as the successful mission to kill Osama bin Laden.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2012
Former Pittsburgh Steelers receiver and longtime Ravens nemesis Hines Ward has a new job as analyst for NBC's "Football Night in America. " But he's still feeling the old "hate" when he comes to Baltimore. Ward, who will be working in Baltimore tonight during the prime-time matchup between the Ravens and New England Patriots, posted this little chronicle on the "hate" he received on his journey to Baltimore for the game. Judging for all the parenthetical "haha's," I'm guessing there's some tongue in cheek from Ward here, but he was a much better receiver than he is a writer, so I am not so sure.
SPORTS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2012
OMAHA, NEB. -- After watching Navy SEALs assault an island of terrorists and then capture a drug smuggler's yacht, Michael Phelps must have viewed his own watery mission as a day at the beach. Phelps bested his own enemies, seven swimmers who would steal a piece of his Olympic action, at the swimming trials here on Thursday night after watching the movie, Act of Valor. The flick stars active member of the elite sea, air and land warriors, known for daring, covert strikes such as the successful mission to kill Osama bin Laden.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2012
Do you ever find yourself wishing for a stylish and luxurious beach resort within a reasonable drive from home? Meet the new Revel Resort in Atlantic City, N.J. Atlantic City? Seriously. Ditch the image of a traditional casino packed with cigar-puffing high-rollers and day-trippers wielding free buffet coupons. Atlantic City's 12th casino opened its oceanfront doors to the public April 2, pioneering an innovative concept: a health-minded resort that also happens to have a glamorous casino targeted to the "beautiful crowd.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman | May 20, 2012
I'll Have Another, fresh off winning the second leg of the Triple Crown, nipped at anyone who came by Sunday morning. He was more playful than ornery. Someone told trainer Doug O'Neill that the colt's eyelids looked heavy.  "He's always got that look," O'Neill shot back. It's true. I'll Have Another appeared only mildly bothered yesterday after running a mile and three-sixteenths in under two minutes and being herded into a crowded winner's circle. After his connections partied late into the night outside of his barn - except for O'Neill, who went to his hotel room with his wife and kids and ordered room service - I'll Have Another was spry at dawn.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | October 25, 2009
Just a few months after her husband drowned their three children, Amy Castillo found herself standing on top of a mountain during a Christian missionary trip to China, winds whipping, rain pouring down. She asked herself a question: "Can I live with this?" A long time passed before she could honestly answer. The man she once playfully called "sexy thing," who swept her off her feet and quickly became her best friend, had gradually vanished over the past five years. In his place was a manic, suicidal stranger who spent entire nights at Baltimore strip clubs, blew thousands of dollars in wild shopping sprees and accused her of being self-righteous and manipulative.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | December 29, 2006
Baltimore is a condo town after all. How else could The Ritz command condo fees approaching $7,000 a month? Yes, a month. That is not a misprint. Nor is it the mortgage. Also called "common charges," the fees cover those little extras - lush landscaping, a fancy fitness center, white-gloved doormen - that will make living at The Ritz feel like, well, living at The Ritz. No one is actually shelling out yet, since the 192-unit development is under construction at the harbor. And the fees - about 58 cents per square foot - will be cheaper for most units.
FEATURES
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 27, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Just like that, this city's only sex symbol had come and gone. This week's sudden and dramatic return and departure of Monica Lewinsky created a media stir the likes of which the capital has not seen since, well, the last Lewinsky visit. Yesterday, cameras captured Lewinsky, bundled in a black coat with faux fur collar, checking out of the Renaissance Mayflower Hotel and zipping off to return home to Los Angeles. Even the tiger stripes on her Kate Spade bag could not scare off the waiting media.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman | May 20, 2012
I'll Have Another, fresh off winning the second leg of the Triple Crown, nipped at anyone who came by Sunday morning. He was more playful than ornery. Someone told trainer Doug O'Neill that the colt's eyelids looked heavy.  "He's always got that look," O'Neill shot back. It's true. I'll Have Another appeared only mildly bothered yesterday after running a mile and three-sixteenths in under two minutes and being herded into a crowded winner's circle. After his connections partied late into the night outside of his barn - except for O'Neill, who went to his hotel room with his wife and kids and ordered room service - I'll Have Another was spry at dawn.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 4, 2005
With this production of Allen Boretz's and John Murray's zany comic farce Room Service, the folks at 2nd Star chase away any lingering winter blahs. Often dismissed as the Marx Brothers' not-so-funny movie, Room Service began life in 1937 as a Broadway show about the indomitable spirit of theater people who could mount a show back then for a mere $15,000. Charles Maloney, the 2nd Star director, met the challenges of enabling his 14-member cast to bring life to these struggling theater people who employ various strategies to remain hotel-housed and fed while bringing their show to production.
TRAVEL
By Susan Stellin and Susan Stellin,New York Times News Service | November 30, 2003
If you pick up a copy of Mobil's 2004 guide to the best hotels and restaurants in America, you'll find just three five-star hotels listed in New York City. Mobil's main competitor in the expanding world of hospitality ratings, the Automobile Association of America, is almost as discriminating: AAA gave its highest award -- five diamonds -- to just five New York City hotels when the company announced its 2004 winners last week. Tough critics, those old-timers, who have been rating American hotels for decades (Mobil since 1958, AAA since 1977)
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