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By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2000
TUITION, ROOM and board for Johns Hopkins University undergraduates living on campus will rise 5 percent next year to $33,121, the university announced yesterday. Tuition alone increases 5.4 percent, to $24,936. Of course, these are just sticker prices; more than half of Homewood students get need-based financial aid, thanks in part to a $45 million pledge two years ago from Hopkins board of trustees Chairman Michael R. Bloomberg. Federal antitrust laws make it illegal for Hopkins to conspire with other schools in setting tuition, but of those announced so far, Hopkins is on the high side.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
A federal investigator has found that Maryland's Medicaid program had a 95 percent error rate in seeking reimbursement for room and board for the developmentally disabled and thus owes the U.S. government nearly $21 million. Advocates expressed concern that the findings could lead to budget cuts to the program and longer stays on waiting lists for vulnerable individuals and struggling families. In a report released Friday, the inspector general for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services said that over a three-year period, state health officials routinely billed the federal government for room-and-board costs that were ineligible under Medicaid rules.
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NEWS
By Boston Globe | October 14, 1992
The cost of attending private colleges and universities rose an average 7 percent this year, while tuition and fees at public colleges and universities shot up an average 10 percent, according to the College Board's annual survey of the price of higher education.For the private institutions, where price tags for tuition, room and board are now approaching $25,000 a year, the increase is relatively modest compared with the double-digit increases of the 1980s. But the public institutions, strained by fiscal crises in many states during the past few years, continue to rely on bigger student charges to keep them afloat.
BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY and ANDREW LECKEY,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | March 12, 2006
Which expenses can be covered with funds from a 529 college savings plan? Which ones aren't covered? I'm a parent. - H.K., via the Internet Named for Section 529 of the Internal Revenue Code, it is a qualified tuition plan whose withdrawals can only be used to pay for higher-education expenses. "Basic expenses covered are tuition, mandatory fees, books, supplies, equipment required by the institution and, if the student is at least half-time, it can also cover room and board," said Joseph Hurley, a certified public accountant and chief executive officer of Savingforcollege.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | March 3, 1993
Yale University announced yesterday that tuition, fees, and room and board will cost $25,110 in the 1993-1994 academic year, making the Ivy League institution the first major college or university to charge more than $25,000.Other private institutions are struggling to keep annual costs below $25,000, according to campus administrators and higher education analysts, because that figure is seen as daunting to parents.Part of the unease about crossing the $25,000 barrier is that it means the cost of getting a four-year college education will reach $100,000 for the first time.
BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY and ANDREW LECKEY,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | March 12, 2006
Which expenses can be covered with funds from a 529 college savings plan? Which ones aren't covered? I'm a parent. - H.K., via the Internet Named for Section 529 of the Internal Revenue Code, it is a qualified tuition plan whose withdrawals can only be used to pay for higher-education expenses. "Basic expenses covered are tuition, mandatory fees, books, supplies, equipment required by the institution and, if the student is at least half-time, it can also cover room and board," said Joseph Hurley, a certified public accountant and chief executive officer of Savingforcollege.
NEWS
By Stuart Silverstein and Stuart Silverstein,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 20, 2004
Tuition and fees have climbed an average of 10.5 percent, or $487, this year at the nation's public four-year colleges and universities, the College Board reported yesterday. The increase was smaller than last year's 13.3 percent but still among the biggest in the past quarter-century. Officials with the nonprofit group and other analysts said that the latest tuition and financial aid trends are forcing many students to go more deeply into debt than in the past to pay for their education.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 24, 1996
ON THIS FINAL Sunday before Thanksgiving, with the scent of fresh nobility in the air, we gather to bless the governor of Maryland, who wishes to bestow upon all serious high school students a free ride at state universities.All they need is a B average and a family income below about $60,000. All the state of Maryland needs is the ability to bankroll such a gallant gesture with about $40 million a year while simultaneously cutting income taxes 10 percent and throwing an unanticipated $254 million at Baltimore's public schools and coping with a long-anticipated $100 million budget shortfall in the coming year.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | November 10, 1993
The Carroll County Liquor Board decided in private yesterday how it will handle two cases involving sales of alcohol to minors.On the advice of County Attorney Charles W. "Chuck" Thompson Jr., board members agreed to determine, in a closed session, the punishment for the two establishments where the sales occurred. Previously, the board's deliberations on liquor violations have been conducted in public.The board made its decisions on the two cases during the closed session but will not make those decisions public until the violators have been notified, officials said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
A federal investigator has found that Maryland's Medicaid program had a 95 percent error rate in seeking reimbursement for room and board for the developmentally disabled and thus owes the U.S. government nearly $21 million. Advocates expressed concern that the findings could lead to budget cuts to the program and longer stays on waiting lists for vulnerable individuals and struggling families. In a report released Friday, the inspector general for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services said that over a three-year period, state health officials routinely billed the federal government for room-and-board costs that were ineligible under Medicaid rules.
NEWS
By Stuart Silverstein and Stuart Silverstein,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 20, 2004
Tuition and fees have climbed an average of 10.5 percent, or $487, this year at the nation's public four-year colleges and universities, the College Board reported yesterday. The increase was smaller than last year's 13.3 percent but still among the biggest in the past quarter-century. Officials with the nonprofit group and other analysts said that the latest tuition and financial aid trends are forcing many students to go more deeply into debt than in the past to pay for their education.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2000
TUITION, ROOM and board for Johns Hopkins University undergraduates living on campus will rise 5 percent next year to $33,121, the university announced yesterday. Tuition alone increases 5.4 percent, to $24,936. Of course, these are just sticker prices; more than half of Homewood students get need-based financial aid, thanks in part to a $45 million pledge two years ago from Hopkins board of trustees Chairman Michael R. Bloomberg. Federal antitrust laws make it illegal for Hopkins to conspire with other schools in setting tuition, but of those announced so far, Hopkins is on the high side.
FEATURES
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 18, 1997
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- The first lady may have made a killing on the commodities market a few years back, but she and President Clinton might have to start playing Lotto if daughter Chelsea accepts an invitation to attend Harvard University.The annual price tag for tuition, room and board and other fees is breathtaking enough at an estimated $31,395.But that doesn't begin to cover the real cost of joining the Harvard Class of 2001. A freshman woman might be run out of Cambridge, for example, without a proper navel piercing ($53)
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 24, 1996
ON THIS FINAL Sunday before Thanksgiving, with the scent of fresh nobility in the air, we gather to bless the governor of Maryland, who wishes to bestow upon all serious high school students a free ride at state universities.All they need is a B average and a family income below about $60,000. All the state of Maryland needs is the ability to bankroll such a gallant gesture with about $40 million a year while simultaneously cutting income taxes 10 percent and throwing an unanticipated $254 million at Baltimore's public schools and coping with a long-anticipated $100 million budget shortfall in the coming year.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | November 10, 1993
The Carroll County Liquor Board decided in private yesterday how it will handle two cases involving sales of alcohol to minors.On the advice of County Attorney Charles W. "Chuck" Thompson Jr., board members agreed to determine, in a closed session, the punishment for the two establishments where the sales occurred. Previously, the board's deliberations on liquor violations have been conducted in public.The board made its decisions on the two cases during the closed session but will not make those decisions public until the violators have been notified, officials said.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | March 3, 1993
Yale University announced yesterday that tuition, fees, and room and board will cost $25,110 in the 1993-1994 academic year, making the Ivy League institution the first major college or university to charge more than $25,000.Other private institutions are struggling to keep annual costs below $25,000, according to campus administrators and higher education analysts, because that figure is seen as daunting to parents.Part of the unease about crossing the $25,000 barrier is that it means the cost of getting a four-year college education will reach $100,000 for the first time.
FEATURES
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 18, 1997
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- The first lady may have made a killing on the commodities market a few years back, but she and President Clinton might have to start playing Lotto if daughter Chelsea accepts an invitation to attend Harvard University.The annual price tag for tuition, room and board and other fees is breathtaking enough at an estimated $31,395.But that doesn't begin to cover the real cost of joining the Harvard Class of 2001. A freshman woman might be run out of Cambridge, for example, without a proper navel piercing ($53)
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 5, 1995
MOSCOW -- In the old days, the typical student at Patrice Lumumba University would be a young African, someone who could hope to become his country's first native-born doctor or engineer after graduation. The new graduate would be expected to take communism home with him and preach of its glories. That communist dream is gone, but the university goes on, struggling to survive in free-market style.Patrice Lumumba University -- alma mater of the terrorist "Carlos" and of hundreds of men and women who are government officials throughout the Third World -- now is a cheap and not so choosy institution.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | October 14, 1992
The cost of attending private colleges and universities rose an average 7 percent this year, while tuition and fees at public colleges and universities shot up an average 10 percent, according to the College Board's annual survey of the price of higher education.For the private institutions, where price tags for tuition, room and board are now approaching $25,000 a year, the increase is relatively modest compared with the double-digit increases of the 1980s. But the public institutions, strained by fiscal crises in many states during the past few years, continue to rely on bigger student charges to keep them afloat.
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