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By Marie Gullard | Special to the Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2010
I n Jim Slayton's and Rob Hradsky's living room, a verse has been painted in flowing script over the camel-back sofa. It reads: "Everything has beauty, but not everyone sees it." For the two men, that simple saying is indicative of their life's work, joy and sacred pledge to the care of their four adopted children and the reason for their move into a 6,500-square-foot Colonial-style home in Woodstock, Md. "We have a commitment to adopting," said Slayton, a nurse in the Howard County Public School System.
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SPORTS
By Jonathan Pitts and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Some call the Flag Court the party deck, and the general-admission patio above right field fit the description as delirious fans traded high-fives, started chants, drained beverages and hollered at Tigers players 90 minutes before game time. But beneath the levity was a quiet battle for terrain. Brian Mills of Hagerstown, in his best Oriole-orange mohawk, sunglasses, beads and dyed beard, arrived three hours before the gates opened but still found himself in the second row. He stood pretty much in the same spot near the right-field foul pole two years ago as the Orioles faced the Yankees in a playoff game, but that time he'd made his way to the fence.
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BUSINESS
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2010
From a table on their deck, Greg Grenier and his partner John Heizer can sit and admire the beautifully landscaped garden below them. Amid tall oak and maple trees that shield like an umbrella, the outdoor room is enveloped and protected from the summer sun. "It's almost like living in the country," said Grenier, 65, who works for the Foreign Service. While the feel is delightfully bucolic, the location is the Reservoir Hill neighborhood in Baltimore. Grenier and Heizer, the 61-year-old director of music at Zion Lutheran, purchased the townhome for $240,000, an excellent deal given the fact that it was previously and impeccably restored by the prior owner, who worked in the Smithsonian Institution's American Furniture Restoration Department.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Saturday's 31-20 victory over visiting North Carolina Central lifted Towson to a 2-2 record, marking their first time at .500 since the beginning of the season. The win also injected some much-needed confidence into the team, coach Rob Ambrose said Monday during his weekly conference call arranged by the Colonial Athletic Association. “These are college students with college-student problems and injuries,” he said. “Everybody's got problems. So it's about managing them as best we can and moving forward.
TRAVEL
By Los Angeles Times | January 20, 2008
On our 25th wedding anniversary, we decided to splurge and stay at a luxury hotel in Paris. Unfortunately, we were given a room next to a building under construction. The hammering and drilling began at 7 a.m. and lasted all day. A hotel manager offered to move us to another room the next day. This made no sense because we were leaving the next day, so we suggested he adjust the bill or buy our dinner in the hotel restaurant. He said no. We were paying $1,000 a night. What should we have done?
FEATURES
By RITA ST.CLAIR | February 24, 1991
Q: We recently bought an old Victorian-style house. Its living room ceiling is 12 feet high with crown moldings, and the windows are tall and narrow. What little furniture we brought along seems too low-slung for such a space. We're going to buy some new furnishings as well as wallpaper and window coverings, but we need your help in making the right choices.A: Let's start with the walls and window treatments. Right off, I suggest you paint the crown molding and baseboards in a color contrasting to the rest of the wall.
FEATURES
By Rose Bennett Gilbert and Rose Bennett Gilbert,Copley News Service | January 5, 1992
Q: We are thinking about opening up the wall between the living and dining rooms in this old house we've been remodeling. I'd like some way to separate the spaces without actually dividing them physically -- the dining room is not very large. What would you suggest?A: One smashing answer would be a free-standing fireplace like the one we show here. Designer Marilynn Lundy of Environmental Images in New York has used a two-sided fireplace as a room-divider par excellence. Not only does it define the space without closing it off, but the fireplace warms the room both literally and emotionally.
NEWS
By Claire Whitcomb and Claire Whitcomb,Universal Press Syndicate | January 18, 2004
The rooms in Stephen Sills and James Huniford's new decorating book are full of flaws. Low ceilings, plain-jane windows, odd corners, awkward beams -- you name it, these rooms have it. But Sills and Huniford, being truly great decorators, have made all these flaws magically disappear. And you can watch them do it in Dwellings: Living With Great Style (Bullfinch Press, $30). One of their favorite magic wands is a monochromatic scheme. With subtle shades of a single color -- golden beige, silvery blue or even warm pink or coral -- they blur many a flaw and, in the process, create serene and seductive spaces.
FEATURES
By Daphne Simpkins | July 28, 1991
"I hate trying on dresses. Your fat hangs out everywhere, and these lights make your skin look gray." It was my mother speaking from within the fitting room of our favorite department store, where she was trying on dresses for her 40th high school reunion.I was along to give advice, to eavesdrop on my mother as she talked to herself. While waiting, I gazed at myself in one of the mirrors. It was one of those trick mirrors that makes you look 10 pounds lighter. It was placed there to sell more dresses, but it offended me. I have no desire to be seduced by a lie, not even a kind one. I smile at myself and wonder one more time, who is that woman staring back at me?
FEATURES
By Sorche Nic Leodhas | January 20, 1999
Editor's note: A rhyming Scottish folktale passed on to the author by her grandfather recounts the outcome of Lachie MacLachlan's hospitality.There was a wee house in the heather --'Twas a bit o' a but and a ben --And in it there lived all togetherLachie MacLachlanAnd his good wife,And his bairns to the number of ten."There's a fire on the hearthstone to warm me,And porridge to spare in the pot,"Said Lachie. "The weather is stormy,So me and my wifeAnd our ten bairns,Will be sharing whatever we've got."
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2014
Maybe it was nerves or the season-openening stage at home or the seemingly relentless pressure from the opposing defense. Whatever the reason, Connor Frazier's debut as the Towson football team's starting quarterback was a shaky one Saturday night. Making his first career start, the junior played inconsistently and was off target in the passing game as the Tigers fell to visiting Central Connecticut State, 31-27, at Johnny Unitas Stadium.  Frazier, whose game-winning touchdown run propelled Towson to the Football Championship Subdivision title game in January, was outplayed by Eagles junior Nick Sangiacomo, who completed 22 of 28 passes for 273 yards and two touchdowns.
TRAVEL
By Donna M. Owens, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Carla Hayden is one of Baltimore's best-known book lovers, one who has spent 21 years at the helm of the city's Enoch Pratt Free Library . When the busy bibliophile takes time off to travel, she appreciates accommodations where books are part of the experience. "One of my favorite hotels is The Library Hotel in New York City," said Hayden, president emeritus of the American Library Association. "It's definitely more than a hotel stay; it's a literary experience. " Housed in a 1912 Neo¿Gothic style "sliver building" - just 25 feet wide and 100 feet long - the luxury hotel is located steps from the New York Public Library.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
The parents of a 6-year-old boy, who Baltimore County police said was severely malnourished and left alone in a hotel room alone for several hours, have been charged. Police said Jessica Lynn Maranto, 33, and Brandon Joseph Johnson, 32, left the boy in a room at the Welcome Inn on Loch Raven Boulevard on August 7. Police initially believed the child was 2-years-old but it was later determined the child was six and suffered from "severe malnutrition," the department said in a statement.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
The Orioles optioned right-hander Miguel Gonzalez to Triple-A Norfolk before Saturday's game in order to make room on the 25-man roster for right-hander Ubaldo Jimenez, who was activated from the 15-day disabled list to start Saturday's game against the St. Louis Cardinals. The move will force Gonzalez to miss at least one start but allows manager Buck Showalter to protect the club's flourishing bullpen. Gonzalez's relegation was by no means a permanent demotion, but because he pitched two days ago, he would able to fulfill the mandatory 10-day minor league window and miss just one start.
NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
A child was found alone in a motel room in Towson Thursday morning around 8:30 a.m. The child, a 6-year-old male was taken to a hospital to be treated for severe malnutrition and was still in the hospital as of Friday afternoon. It is unknown when the child will be released. Baltimore County Police have identified the child's parents but no charges have been filed. The state's attorney will determine whether the parents will be charged after the Crimes Against Children Unit has thoroughly investigated the case, police said.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
Two of the Ravens' most promising defensive rookies suffered injuries Wednesday at training camp. Defensive end Brent Urban, a fourth round draft pick out of Virginia, was carted off the field into the training room, unable to put weight on his right leg. Urban has injured his right knee and will have a magnetic resonance imaging exam tonight to determine the severity of the damage. Urban had ankle surgery in February following the Senior Bowl, but had fully recovered from the procedure.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair | August 9, 1992
Backgrounds are very often a designer's first concern. That's because they establish a tone and a direction for an entire setting.I find it helpful to think of a room's background as a sort of envelope. It sends a message while also enclosing all the contents. Careful attention must be paid to the background, which includes the walls, floor and window-covering, regardless of whether one is creating a palatial interior or something much more modest. The textures, colors and patterns chosen for these surfaces invariably will have a major influence on a room's overall appearance.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | August 29, 2004
MY WIFE IS a sportswriter. This is good and bad. The good part is this: Say I'm lying on the sofa watching pro football, and my team, the Miami Dolphins, has the ball, and it's third and four, a situation in which the Dolphins, after considering all 3,487 of their offensive plays, always decide to send the running back into the middle of the line for a gain of two yards. Always. The other team expects it, as does everybody else watching the game, including stadium-dwelling cockroaches, who wave their feelers to indicate: "Here goes the running back up the middle for two."
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2014
Ananda, a new Indian restaurant from Binda and Kehar Singh, the brothers who own the  Ambassador Dining Room  in Tuscany-Canterbury, is now open in Howard County's Maple Lawn community.   Ananda, which serves a menu similar to the Ambassador, is in a quiet-opening, or soft-opening, phase -- the low-key method some restaurants use as they work out kinks and train the staff. The official opening will be in a few weeks, Binda Singh said. Ananda is open daily from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. Ananda is at  7421 Maple Lawn Blvd.
NEWS
July 17, 2014
As someone who runs along the Inner Harbor frequently, it's easy to recall the many times walkers would stop to see the trapeze school participants and teachers performing there a decade ago. It was a natural draw, especially in the evening with lights beaming on the net-surrounded spot. The high cost of the attraction probably did it in. But it is with some dismay that I read about plans regarding Rash Field that would take away the constant attraction that is the beach volleyball courts ( "City looks at another go-round at Rash Field," July 11)
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