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February 2, 1991
Services for William T. Prahm, a retired roofer who had fished in Ocean City since 1944, will be held at 2 p.m. tomorrow at the Barton Funeral Home in Centreville.Mr. Prahm, who was 87 and had been a resident of Ocean City since 1971, died of congestive heart failure Wednesday.A native of Scotland who became known as Scotty after coming to the United States at the age of 21, he owned a roofing business in Philadelphia until retiring in 1971.He began fishing in the Ocean City Inlet in 1944, but switched to the U.S. 50 bridge after a 1962 hurricane.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
Timothy B. Ruff, who was owner and president of Ruff Roofers Inc., which was known for its exacting craftsmanship, died Friday of undetermined causes at his Queenstown home. The former Catonsville resident was 53. "We are waiting for the results of an autopsy to determine the cause of death," said a son, Robert C. Ruff of Federal Hill. Timothy Bruce Ruff was born in Baltimore and raised in Catonsville, where he graduated from Catonsville High School. He also attended Villa Julie College.
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NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | April 3, 1996
A Baltimore roofer who was struck by an industrial crane's boom while working at the Springfield Hospital Center was in critical but stable condition yesterday afternoon at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore, a hospital spokeswoman said.Robert W. Arbogast Jr., 46, was working atop the geriatric building at the Sykesville hospital about 9: 10 a.m. when a crane being used to lift materials to the roof broke free from its mounting, said Libby Luebberman, assistant chief of the Sykesville Fire Company.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 26, 2010
John Elsen III, a mechanical engineer who owned a roofing business, died Nov. 15 of injuries from a fall off a roof in North Baltimore. He was 62 and lived in Overlea. Born in Chicago and raised in Evanston, Ill., he earned a degree in mechanical engineering from Minnesota State University. Mr. Elsen moved to Baltimore more than 20 years ago and founded C. Joy Roofers, a business named for his daughter. He had many customers in North Baltimore. "He became a fixture in this neighborhood," said Andrew J. O'Brien, who lives in the Tuscany- Canterbury neighborhood.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Sun Staff Writer | April 14, 1994
A Baltimore County jury took just 45 minutes yesterday to convict an Essex roofer of attempted murder in the near-fatal shooting of Officer James E. Beck last Halloween.Mark Phillip French, 29, of the 300 block of George Ave., was found guilty of first-degree attempted murder of the officer, robbery with a deadly weapon of an Essex man, and use of a handgun in both offenses.Circuit Judge James T. Smith Jr. set sentencing for May 25. French could receive up to life in prison.His girlfriend, Heather Lynn Kendall, 17, of the 700 block of Aldworth Ave. in Dundalk, pleaded guilty Friday to robbery and a handgun charge.
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,Sun Staff | February 22, 2004
We cannot tell a lie. It's George Washington's birthday today. In honor of the father of our country and his prized Mount Vernon, Va., estate, York Wallcoverings has created a home collection of wallpapers and borders and an art accent mural window. The designs are based on original historic documents from the Mount Vernon archives, including Washington's journals and books. Designs include Chairs With Writing (pictured above), featuring neoclassical chairs against a background of Washington's handwriting; Mount Vernon Scenic Toile (right)
NEWS
October 23, 1990
George J. Thaler Inc. has about one million stove parts on hand in the 5,000 bins of its red brick building at the corner of Madison Street and Central Avenue. All this is the legacy of the firm's 130-year history. That history is now ending. The store opened by Lorenz Thaler, a tinsmith and roofer who emigrated from Germany, is going out of business.Over the years, the Thaler firm has withstood many crises. First came central heating, then tin roofs became obsolete. And even though wood-burning stoves are now experiencing a renaissance of sorts, this unique tin-ceilinged store's owners have decided that enough is enough.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | April 19, 2003
WHEN CLINGING to a rooftop, questions about eternity spring to mind. You wonder, for instance: If there is an afterlife, will it have roof leaks that need fixing? Last weekend, as I positioned myself around a rooftop vent pipe, and gingerly, ever so gingerly, patched a hole that appeared at its base, I hoped these were questions that I wasn't going to resolve that afternoon. When I was younger, and dumber, climbing did not bother me. But as I age, I become much more aware that bad things can happen to upwardly mobile people, especially those with bad knees and bifocals.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | April 27, 1991
Like many American homes, mine has about 10,000 keys.We have golden keys, silvery keys, round keys, square keys, rubber-coated keys, little keys that virtually float in your pocket and big keys that are so heavy they make your pockets sag.And like many Americans, I have virtually no idea what most of these keys unlock.This became apparent to me recently when I tried to find the spare key for the backyard gate. I needed it to get the roof fixed.Without the key, the roofer couldn't get through the gate, and therefore couldn't get his roofing material from his truck in the alley and up to the soggy roof.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | September 14, 1996
WHEN A GUY returns to the helm of his household, he likes to see some proof that his steady hand has been missed.He doesn't want to return to ruptured plumbing, smoldering wiring or collapsing walls, but he wouldn't mind seeing a minor disorder or two. A light bulb snapped off in its socket. A screw that has strayed from its mooring. A tool out of place. He regards this as evidence that his presence, his sense of order, his manly mien has been missed.Recently, when I returned home from a weeklong journey, I made myself available for consultation, minor repair work and dispersal of wisdom.
NEWS
By Don Markus | don.markus@baltsun.com | February 13, 2010
With construction down and the economy sluggish, the state's roofers have grown accustomed in recent years to looking for business. But after back-to-back snowstorms, business is now coming to them. "The phones are ringing off the hook," Randy Piccoli, sales director of Brothers Services in Hampstead, said between calls from homeowners frantic about leaking roofs and collapsing gutters. "They're asking, 'What can you do immediately? Can you get here today?' "Piccoli said.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to the Sun | April 25, 2007
Kenneth Benner Superintendent of the service department Magco Inc., of Jessup, a division of Tecta America Corp. Salary --$65,000, plus bonuses Age --44 Years on the job --15 How he got started --Benner worked various positions at Safeway for 14 years. During a companywide contract negotiation Benner was let go and needed to find a new job. He interviewed at Magco at the suggestion of a neighbor and was hired to work as a commercial roofer. He spent two years on a crew constructing roofs and then was promoted to the service department as foreman and later superintendent.
NEWS
August 11, 2005
Elizabeth Ann "Libby" Frist, a roofing and slate company office manager, died of cancer Monday at Franklin Square Hospital Center. The White Marsh resident was 60. Born Elizabeth Ann Adamski in Baltimore and raised in the Northshire section of Dundalk, she was a 1963 graduate of Dundalk High School. For more than 35 years, Mrs. Frist was officer manager for Gummer Roofing Co., and later Gummer Slate in White Marsh, businesses in which her husband was an owner. She also worked as a bookkeeper and billing specialist for two Rosedale-area physicians.
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,Sun Staff | February 22, 2004
We cannot tell a lie. It's George Washington's birthday today. In honor of the father of our country and his prized Mount Vernon, Va., estate, York Wallcoverings has created a home collection of wallpapers and borders and an art accent mural window. The designs are based on original historic documents from the Mount Vernon archives, including Washington's journals and books. Designs include Chairs With Writing (pictured above), featuring neoclassical chairs against a background of Washington's handwriting; Mount Vernon Scenic Toile (right)
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | April 19, 2003
WHEN CLINGING to a rooftop, questions about eternity spring to mind. You wonder, for instance: If there is an afterlife, will it have roof leaks that need fixing? Last weekend, as I positioned myself around a rooftop vent pipe, and gingerly, ever so gingerly, patched a hole that appeared at its base, I hoped these were questions that I wasn't going to resolve that afternoon. When I was younger, and dumber, climbing did not bother me. But as I age, I become much more aware that bad things can happen to upwardly mobile people, especially those with bad knees and bifocals.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | January 29, 2000
THESE DAYS my eyes are lifted toward the heavens, but my mind is on the gutters. It is melting time, a nervous period for homeowners. The big snow of last Tuesday sits on our roofs, slowly warming and returning to its liquid state. In theory, this is a simple process. The snow melts, runs down the roof into the gutter and is carried away from the house. Reality is often more complicated. Some of the snow melts. It meanders to the gutters, where, when the sun goes down, it freezes, filling the gutters with ice. More water arrives, over- flows the gutters, and icicles form.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | April 1, 1994
Attention, lovers of folk art, holiday decorations and visually overwhelming tackiana. The more-is-more spirit of decorating has spread from Christmas to Easter. Check out German Hill Road in greater Dundalk, just east of Merritt Boulevard, across from the three cemeteries. Egg trees, inflatable bunnies and colorful plastic lawn ornaments have blossomed in front of about six rowhouses. If you're near Dundalk this weekend, do the detour.Laughter despite illnessStu "Professor Kool" Kerr, veteran TV personality and one of our most beloved characters, was diagnosed with bone cancer seven years ago, and he continues treatments for it. I visited him the other morning, and will tell you this: The illness hasn't stopped the laughter.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | January 29, 2000
THESE DAYS my eyes are lifted toward the heavens, but my mind is on the gutters. It is melting time, a nervous period for homeowners. The big snow of last Tuesday sits on our roofs, slowly warming and returning to its liquid state. In theory, this is a simple process. The snow melts, runs down the roof into the gutter and is carried away from the house. Reality is often more complicated. Some of the snow melts. It meanders to the gutters, where, when the sun goes down, it freezes, filling the gutters with ice. More water arrives, over- flows the gutters, and icicles form.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | August 31, 1997
PHILADELPHIA -- With his cable TV gone, Corona is making do with a portable radio.Still, the Bengal-Siberian tiger found in a North Philadelphia rowhouse is a creature of habit. He insists on having his pillows fluffed and a bay-window view of his surroundings.And Philadelphia Zoo officials responded, doing their darnedest this weekend to make Corona, who they say is more human than feline, comfortable in his new home.Corona's keepers created a sort of replica of his former digs.Instead of his own bedroom, he has a stall to himself.
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