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NEWS
By Dan Reese and Dan Reese,Staff writer | October 13, 1991
Most weekend laborers spend much of the autumn with their eyes cast downward -- digging holes for their tulip bulbs, checking the alignment of the flagstone path they're laying, pulling the last few tomatoes off the vine.Looming over their heads is a fall job that shouldbe on every homeowner's list: the semiannual roof inspection.While major roofing should be left to professionals, regular inspections and minor repairs will prolong your home's life, protect its contents and prevent today's hairline leaks from becoming next year'shair-pulling repair bills.
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EXPLORE
December 2, 2012
The City of Westminster's Facade Improvement Program this week received a state grant of $50,000 as part of Maryland's Community Legacy program awards. The award was part of an overall package of $5.5 million awarded to projects across the state, and was announced by Lt. Governor Anthony G. Brown on Nov. 27 at an event in Baltimore. The Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development manages the program. The goal of the Community Legacy initiative is to provide local governments and community development organizations with funding for projects aimed at retaining and attracting businesses and encouraging homeownership and commercial revitalization.
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NEWS
May 17, 1992
The Odenton Branch of the Anne Arundel County Library is closed through June 1 for roof repairs and asbestos removal.Patrons may use the nearby branches at Provinces in the Severn Square Shopping Center, Maryland City in the Maryland City Shopping Center, or Crofton in the Crofton Centre.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | July 8, 2009
North Baltimore residents are rallying to save a 107-year-old firehouse in Waverly that was closed last month when holes in the roof made the fire crew's living quarters uninhabitable. The firefighters, paramedics and apparatus of Engine 31 have been moved to a newer fire station a half-mile away, but residents want their old station back. "The firehouse is very important to the community," said City Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke, who represents the area. "It is a mainstay of Waverly. It will reopen."
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer Reporter Sherrie Ruhl contributed to this article | October 18, 1992
It still rains in some Harford classrooms -- to the dismay of county lawmakers."We thought we had taken care of the roof problems, but we continue to get letters saying, 'Our school has leaks,' and that upsets us," Council President Jeffrey D. Wilson told Harford School Superintendent Ray R. Keech at the council meeting Tuesday night."
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1998
Acknowledging that enrollment is beginning to level off and older buildings are in desperate need of repair, Baltimore County school officials proposed last night to devote almost all of the school system's capital budget for 1999-2000 to maintenance projects.The proposed $74.2 million capital budget, which was presented to the school board, calls for $62 million to be spent on major maintenance and roof repairs in fiscal year 2000."We're over the hump" of new enrollment, Gene L. Neff, the school system's chief engineer, said in a brief interview after presenting the spending plan to the board.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,Sun reporter | September 8, 2007
A 140-year-old Highlandtown church undergoing roof repairs was heavily damaged yesterday afternoon in a three-alarm fire, the third Baltimore church this summer to be engulfed in flames. The fire started about 4 p.m. on the top two floors of the three-story New Light Church at 200 S. Highland Ave., not long after roof repair workers and a church official had left at about 3 p.m., Baltimore Fire Department spokesman Capt. Kevin Cartwright said. No cause had been determined, Cartwright said, and fire officials could not say whether the roof repairs over the past two days played any part in the fire.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 21, 2005
Library officials are planning a grand reopening celebration tomorrow to mark the renovations and improvements at the Forest Park branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library. The renovations included fresh paint, new furniture, carpet replacement and infrastructure improvements, said Mona M. Rock, the library system's director of communications. The cost of the renovations, about $40,000, was paid for from an anonymous gift of more than $1 million that was given to the Pratt in March. The money was designated for the system's branches.
EXPLORE
December 2, 2012
The City of Westminster's Facade Improvement Program this week received a state grant of $50,000 as part of Maryland's Community Legacy program awards. The award was part of an overall package of $5.5 million awarded to projects across the state, and was announced by Lt. Governor Anthony G. Brown on Nov. 27 at an event in Baltimore. The Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development manages the program. The goal of the Community Legacy initiative is to provide local governments and community development organizations with funding for projects aimed at retaining and attracting businesses and encouraging homeownership and commercial revitalization.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | May 10, 1992
Giving raises to all county employees, repairing school roofs and buying new school supplies were the top suggestions citizens made to the County Council Thursday during the first of two public hearings on the proposed operating budget for next year.About 100 people attended the hearing Thursday at North Harford High School on County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann's $188.6 million operating budget proposal for the 1993 fiscal year, which begins July 1.The other hearing is scheduled for 7 p.m. Thursday, in the C. Milton Wright High School auditorium.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,Sun reporter | September 8, 2007
A 140-year-old Highlandtown church undergoing roof repairs was heavily damaged yesterday afternoon in a three-alarm fire, the third Baltimore church this summer to be engulfed in flames. The fire started about 4 p.m. on the top two floors of the three-story New Light Church at 200 S. Highland Ave., not long after roof repair workers and a church official had left at about 3 p.m., Baltimore Fire Department spokesman Capt. Kevin Cartwright said. No cause had been determined, Cartwright said, and fire officials could not say whether the roof repairs over the past two days played any part in the fire.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ | January 4, 2006
A Southwest Baltimore man who had been charged in a neighborhood dispute - and then paid two men $50 apiece to club the witness with broken table legs to prevent him from testifying - pleaded guilty yesterday to assault and witness-intimidation charges. Joseph John DiAngelo Jr., 52, was sentenced by Baltimore Circuit Judge Sylvester B. Cox to 15 years in prison. One of the men DiAngelo hired was fatally injured during the home-invasion-style attack, likely when residents sat on his chest.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 21, 2005
Library officials are planning a grand reopening celebration tomorrow to mark the renovations and improvements at the Forest Park branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library. The renovations included fresh paint, new furniture, carpet replacement and infrastructure improvements, said Mona M. Rock, the library system's director of communications. The cost of the renovations, about $40,000, was paid for from an anonymous gift of more than $1 million that was given to the Pratt in March. The money was designated for the system's branches.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1998
Acknowledging that enrollment is beginning to level off and older buildings are in desperate need of repair, Baltimore County school officials proposed last night to devote almost all of the school system's capital budget for 1999-2000 to maintenance projects.The proposed $74.2 million capital budget, which was presented to the school board, calls for $62 million to be spent on major maintenance and roof repairs in fiscal year 2000."We're over the hump" of new enrollment, Gene L. Neff, the school system's chief engineer, said in a brief interview after presenting the spending plan to the board.
NEWS
November 22, 1996
THE PLANNING and Zoning Commission in Carroll County, a constant center of controversy, is out of control. At least that's county Commissioner Donald Dell's opinion, although it is one that is gaining in popularity.This time, the seven-member planning body is under fire for its slash-and-burn mentality toward the county schools capital budget, which includes construction, technology and repair projects. When it finished reviewing the schools request last week, the P&Z commission withheld approval for nearly everything, including computers, roof repairs -- even new schools.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1995
The eight-alarm fire that destroyed Clipper Industrial Park and killed a Baltimore firefighter last month was caused by a tenant who has since disappeared, according to sources close to the investigation.The sources say it is not clear whether the fire was set intentionally. But investigators have ruled the cause incendiary, meaning the fire was ignited by someone, whether the individual intended to burn the building or not.If officials can determine motive, they can change their ruling to arson -- which could lead to criminal charges in connection with the fire, which leveled a 19th-century iron foundry most recently used for artist studios.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | August 9, 1992
The source of financing for roof repairs to the old Barrel House on Distillery Drive in Westminster was incorrectly identified in an article Aug. 9. The repair cost will be covered by bonds sold by the county commissioners in 1990 for purchase and renovations.The Carroll County Sun regrets the error.The opening of a planned center to serve teen-age parents and their children faces a two-month delay because of a leaky roof, but the program's director says the delay won't cause major problems.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ | January 4, 2006
A Southwest Baltimore man who had been charged in a neighborhood dispute - and then paid two men $50 apiece to club the witness with broken table legs to prevent him from testifying - pleaded guilty yesterday to assault and witness-intimidation charges. Joseph John DiAngelo Jr., 52, was sentenced by Baltimore Circuit Judge Sylvester B. Cox to 15 years in prison. One of the men DiAngelo hired was fatally injured during the home-invasion-style attack, likely when residents sat on his chest.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | January 28, 1995
From what we've been hearing, last winter's ugly weather left more than bad memories for a lot of people: all the ice, thawing, ice, thawing, ice and so on left lasting damage to roofs throughout the mid-Atlantic.While ice may not have damaged the shingles, or surface of the roof, it did insidious damage to flashing, gutters and drip edges, where the roof ends at the gutters. All of these places may need to be caulked, tightened up or replaced.One problem with roof repairs is that they are hard to make when they're most needed -- while it's raining for two straight weeks, or when they're covered with snow.
NEWS
By LOURDES SULLIVAN | August 6, 1993
Elizabeth Ogden, a member of Savage United Methodist Church has been in Frostburg all week.For the third time, she and dedicated adults and teens have spent a week in Appalachia repairing the houses of those who don't have the resources to do so themselves.The group, including adults Tom Hoffman and Fred Wehland and teens Shawn Vollmerhausen, J.J. Hartner and John Trent, earned money to pay for accommodations in dormitories and for the materials needed for the repairs. They've held car washes and spaghetti dinners and solicited donations.
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