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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2012
Just minutes after the gates opened at Camden Yards, the new Roof Deck had its first customer -- Romeo Santos of Pigtown. "My goal was to be the first one up on this deck and grab a beer. " Roof Deck is open to Oriole Park ticket-holders at every game, a fact that seemed to impress even a Baltimore City police officer, who was overhead expressing his approval of the covered center-field bar and viewing platform. Variations of the Roof Deck have become popular mixing areas in other stadiums, especially for restless fans who want to keep half an eye on the game as they move around the park.
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BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2012
After the Mount Vernon United Methodist Church was ravaged by a lightning-strike fire four years ago, the Hampden neighborhood was left with what appeared to be an unusable building. But Mark Dent saw more than a burned-out shell of an old stone church. He saw the future home of Chesapeake Systems, the 25-person computer company he co-owns. Still, the rebirth of the burned out church as a commercial building almost didn't happen. Dent's company spent months — and thousands of dollars — trying to work through the city's antiquated zoning law. As the process dragged on, he thought seriously about moving out of Baltimore, to an office park off Interstate 95. The city hopes to avoid such near-misses with a far-reaching piece of legislation, "Transform Baltimore," that would replace the city's decades-old zoning law. The new law is designed to be more understandable, speed up the zoning process, and discourage ad hoc zoning layers that are being used to sidestep outmoded rules.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2012
On Saturday night, I walked down to Camden Yards and bought a $10 Upper Reserved ticket. At some point, it became less $10 ticket and more like a $10 cover charge, the price for admission to a gorgeous urban gathering place and to the new Roof Deck in particular. The choice seats on the new Roof Deck at Camden Yards are first-come, first-served. So far, that seems to be working. On Saturday night, a few fans wearing Minnesota Twins gear had successful commandeered a few of the front-row stools under the overhang, and no one seemed to begrudge them them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2012
Of all the night spots in the country, Kevin Spacey's all time favorite can be found not in New York, not in Los Angeles, not in some international jet-setter hub, but right here in Annapolis. The Oscar-winner tells Men's Journal that his top spot for late-night lounging is Metropolitan Kitchen & Lounge, on West Street. "It's both a music venue with live bands and a bar with a roof deck," Spacey tells the magazine. "A very cool place. " Metropolitan's new chef David Kidwell is kvelling.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2012
Of all the night spots in the country, Kevin Spacey's all time favorite can be found not in New York, not in Los Angeles, not in some international jet-setter hub, but right here in Annapolis. The Oscar-winner tells Men's Journal that his top spot for late-night lounging is Metropolitan Kitchen & Lounge, on West Street. "It's both a music venue with live bands and a bar with a roof deck," Spacey tells the magazine. "A very cool place. " Metropolitan's new chef David Kidwell is kvelling.
NEWS
July 12, 2011
I'm deeply troubled by the violence at the Inner Harbor on July 4 ("Inner Harbor Fireworks," July 6). I've lived in Locust Point, the safest part of Baltimore, for the last four years after moving here from northern New Jersey. On July 4, my husband and I spent a great night on a neighbor's roof deck enjoying live music, food and drink. Little did I know there was violence just a few blocks away. I was shocked and upset to learn that a 4-year-old boy was shot and a man from Alabama was killed with a broken bottle during the festivities.
BUSINESS
By Lynn Marie Honeywill | August 14, 2005
When Jeff and Leeann Ratnow bought their rehabbed Riverside Park rowhouse in 1998, they were delighted by the clear view of the Inner Harbor from its roof decks. What the Ratnows couldn't see was the shoddy workmanship and faulty deck design that had damaged the roof, troubling the Ratnows with leaks for five years. To reconstruct the decks and roof and twice rebuild their water-damaged living room cost them $25,000, a figure that doesn't include the thousands paid by their insurance company for mold abatement.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | May 4, 1991
A deck on the roof can be a wonderful thing, with unimpeded sunlight and a view to the farthest horizon. If your house is a good candidate for one, a roof deck will enhance it like no other feature.But however desirable it may be, you can't just stick the deck up there. There has to be plenty of structural support underneath."In principle, what you are doing is adding a floor to the house," says Kip Humphrey of Baltimore. His company, Deckcraft Inc., builds more than 100 decks a year.That means that the structure has to support the "dead load" -- the weight of the deck's building materials -- and the "live load" -- deadload plus the weight of the furniture and people that will use it when it's finished.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa | May 29, 2008
Consistently filling a bar or club gets tougher the longer it's open. For the first six months, people go because it's new. But bringing them back on a regular basis after the six-month mark isn't easy. So it's good to see Bobby's Jazz Club and Cigar Bar thriving in South Baltimore. The club, which opened in October, is a corner bar with two floors and a second-story roof deck out back. It's clear the owners spared little expense on the decor -- between the vintage wooden bar back, exposed brick and roof deck, Bobby's has a cool, classic feel.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | April 4, 2012
Give the Orioles credit: They sure do stadium renovations well. Way better than they play ball. I say that after getting a sneak peek Wednesday at all the changes to Camden Yards we've been hearing so much about. Bottom line? You're going to love what they've done to the place, even if you're a hard-core fan who's not big on a lot of architectural frou-frou at the ballpark. Assuming, that is, there are any hard-core baseball fans left. "I think we still have hard-core fans," said Janet Marie Smith, Orioles vice president of planning and development.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2012
On Saturday night, I walked down to Camden Yards and bought a $10 Upper Reserved ticket. At some point, it became less $10 ticket and more like a $10 cover charge, the price for admission to a gorgeous urban gathering place and to the new Roof Deck in particular. The choice seats on the new Roof Deck at Camden Yards are first-come, first-served. So far, that seems to be working. On Saturday night, a few fans wearing Minnesota Twins gear had successful commandeered a few of the front-row stools under the overhang, and no one seemed to begrudge them them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2012
Just minutes after the gates opened at Camden Yards, the new Roof Deck had its first customer -- Romeo Santos of Pigtown. "My goal was to be the first one up on this deck and grab a beer. " Roof Deck is open to Oriole Park ticket-holders at every game, a fact that seemed to impress even a Baltimore City police officer, who was overhead expressing his approval of the covered center-field bar and viewing platform. Variations of the Roof Deck have become popular mixing areas in other stadiums, especially for restless fans who want to keep half an eye on the game as they move around the park.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | April 4, 2012
Give the Orioles credit: They sure do stadium renovations well. Way better than they play ball. I say that after getting a sneak peek Wednesday at all the changes to Camden Yards we've been hearing so much about. Bottom line? You're going to love what they've done to the place, even if you're a hard-core fan who's not big on a lot of architectural frou-frou at the ballpark. Assuming, that is, there are any hard-core baseball fans left. "I think we still have hard-core fans," said Janet Marie Smith, Orioles vice president of planning and development.
NEWS
July 12, 2011
I'm deeply troubled by the violence at the Inner Harbor on July 4 ("Inner Harbor Fireworks," July 6). I've lived in Locust Point, the safest part of Baltimore, for the last four years after moving here from northern New Jersey. On July 4, my husband and I spent a great night on a neighbor's roof deck enjoying live music, food and drink. Little did I know there was violence just a few blocks away. I was shocked and upset to learn that a 4-year-old boy was shot and a man from Alabama was killed with a broken bottle during the festivities.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa | May 29, 2008
Consistently filling a bar or club gets tougher the longer it's open. For the first six months, people go because it's new. But bringing them back on a regular basis after the six-month mark isn't easy. So it's good to see Bobby's Jazz Club and Cigar Bar thriving in South Baltimore. The club, which opened in October, is a corner bar with two floors and a second-story roof deck out back. It's clear the owners spared little expense on the decor -- between the vintage wooden bar back, exposed brick and roof deck, Bobby's has a cool, classic feel.
BUSINESS
By Lynn Marie Honeywill | August 14, 2005
When Jeff and Leeann Ratnow bought their rehabbed Riverside Park rowhouse in 1998, they were delighted by the clear view of the Inner Harbor from its roof decks. What the Ratnows couldn't see was the shoddy workmanship and faulty deck design that had damaged the roof, troubling the Ratnows with leaks for five years. To reconstruct the decks and roof and twice rebuild their water-damaged living room cost them $25,000, a figure that doesn't include the thousands paid by their insurance company for mold abatement.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2012
After the Mount Vernon United Methodist Church was ravaged by a lightning-strike fire four years ago, the Hampden neighborhood was left with what appeared to be an unusable building. But Mark Dent saw more than a burned-out shell of an old stone church. He saw the future home of Chesapeake Systems, the 25-person computer company he co-owns. Still, the rebirth of the burned out church as a commercial building almost didn't happen. Dent's company spent months — and thousands of dollars — trying to work through the city's antiquated zoning law. As the process dragged on, he thought seriously about moving out of Baltimore, to an office park off Interstate 95. The city hopes to avoid such near-misses with a far-reaching piece of legislation, "Transform Baltimore," that would replace the city's decades-old zoning law. The new law is designed to be more understandable, speed up the zoning process, and discourage ad hoc zoning layers that are being used to sidestep outmoded rules.
BUSINESS
By Lynn Marie Honeywill and Lynn Marie Honeywill,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 14, 2005
Moving from their central Pennsylvania home and its half-acre lawn to Baltimore, Ray and Jennifer Inman chose a Federal Hill rowhouse with a deck on its third-floor roof. "We wouldn't have bought a house without a rooftop deck," said Ray Inman, 35, a sales executive. He and wife, Jennifer, 34, a physical therapist and gardener who is six months' pregnant, bought their house in late 2001. "It's the only sense of a yard we can have living in the city, and we love it," Ray Inman said of his two-story wood deck.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | May 4, 1991
A deck on the roof can be a wonderful thing, with unimpeded sunlight and a view to the farthest horizon. If your house is a good candidate for one, a roof deck will enhance it like no other feature.But however desirable it may be, you can't just stick the deck up there. There has to be plenty of structural support underneath."In principle, what you are doing is adding a floor to the house," says Kip Humphrey of Baltimore. His company, Deckcraft Inc., builds more than 100 decks a year.That means that the structure has to support the "dead load" -- the weight of the deck's building materials -- and the "live load" -- deadload plus the weight of the furniture and people that will use it when it's finished.
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