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Ronald Reagan

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NEWS
November 16, 2011
Your editorial "Fixing the Messenger" (Nov. 12) was the best thing I have read in The Sun for a long time. I have long maintained that Ronald Reagan's bizarre economic policies caused untold harm to the nation when he was president, and they continue to haunt us today. Jack Kinstlinger, Baltimore
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NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | August 10, 2014
Let's say you are an intelligent, successful federal prosecutor from an elite law school and possessing all of the important political contacts in Washington, D.C. An election occurs. Your party wins, and the president-elect begins to put together a cabinet. One day you receive a call from the transition team. Senior aides want to know if you are interested in becoming the next U.S. attorney general. You take it, right? Wrong. You tell the president-elect's people that they have the wrong number.
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | July 7, 2011
5.1, 9.3, 8.1, 8.5, 8, 7.1 and 3.9. While that might sound like a controversial series of Olympic curling scores, these numbers in fact add up to a grave problem for PresidentBarack Obama. They are the quarterly percentage gains in gross domestic product starting in 1983 through to Election Day 1984. And they aren't the only significant numbers. In 1984, real income for individuals grew by more than 6 percent and inflation plummeted. The unemployment rate in November 1984 was still 7.2 percent - relatively high - but it had dropped from 10.8 percent in December 1982, and it was clear the momentum was for even lower unemployment.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 7, 2014
At a time when the Republican Party needs a heavy dose of compromise to bring functionality back to government, one of its most admirable models of goodwill and working across the aisle has departed with the death at 88 last week of Howard Henry Baker Jr. of Tennessee. The state's first elected GOP senator, former Senate majority leader, Reagan White House chief of staff and presidential aspirant was a gentle throwback to the brand of moderate conservatism that got things done without breaking the china.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 7, 2004
WASHINGTON - The passing of Ronald Reagan at 93 brings with it a rush of personal memories, none of which tell what kind of president he was but illustrate why he so effectively plucked the heartstrings of his fellow Americans. I first met him in 1966 when he was running for governor of California, occasionally flying around the state with him in a beat-up old propeller plane previously used by a turkey farmer to cart his birds to market. It was nicknamed "The Turkey," and on each landing we reporters - and the candidate - would make loud gobbling sounds in appreciation, and relief, for the safe touchdown.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | June 5, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Last summer, when Bob Dole was still hearing the heavy footsteps of conservative Sen. Phil Gramm behind him, he told a meeting of the Republican National Committee that "if that's what you want, I'll be another Ronald Reagan."Apparently many fellow Republicans do want their presumptive 1996 presidential nominee to be just that, urging him to propose a juicy tax cut in the fashion of the Great Communicator. Like Mr. Reagan in 1980, Mr. Dole is saying now that he can cut the deficit while cutting taxes, which Mr. Reagan failed spectacularly to do in his eight years as president.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | November 7, 1991
Washington WATCHING coverage of the gala opening of Ronald Reagan's presidential library this week, my thoughts catapulted back to that day in December 1987 when the president gave me the scoop of any journalist's lifetime.It was the week of the history-making meeting between President Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev. Far from the coziness between American and Russian leaders today, the two leaders were circling each other like wary male pups. And 5,000 journalists from across the world were in Washington, trying to gauge the political sociology of those circles.
NEWS
By Matt Patterson | July 7, 2009
Sarah Palin makes it hard to be her fan. There is much to admire about the Alaska governor, who announced Friday she would be stepping down effective July 26. Her verve and charm; her impressive rise from PTA mom to would-be vice president; her range of talents, from athletics to politics; her apparent success at keeping a large and growing family intact wile pursuing a high-stakes, high-stress career. All of this speaks well of the governor and her mettle. And so it is no wonder that, from the moment she strode with preternatural confidence to the stage at the 2008 Republican National Convention, she ignited hope among conservatives that she may be a new Ronald Reagan - someone who could lead the GOP out of its current political wilderness.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | April 4, 1991
WHEN FORMER President Ronald Reagan "celebrated" the 10th anniversary of his near-assassination here the other day, his endorsement of pending legislation to require a seven-day waiting period for a handgun purchase was greeted as some kind of breakthrough. But it really was Rip Van Winkle awakening from a decade of stupor to say something he should have said even before he was shot.All through Reagan's White House tenure, it was a not-so-well-kept secret that he was a man held captive by the rigidity of conservative dogma.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | December 2, 2003
CHICAGO -- When Texas Gov. George W. Bush gave his first major foreign policy address as a presidential candidate, he could have spoken at the George Bush Presidential Library and Museum in College Station, Texas. He didn't. He spoke at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum in Simi Valley, Calif. Ever since, he's worked so hard to style himself as the reincarnation of the Gipper that when he leaves office, I half expect him to enroll at Notre Dame. The efforts have paid off. Lately, whenever Mr. Bush opens his mouth on the subject of foreign policy, commentators draw on all their analytical skills and historical perspective and conclude, "Why, that man sounds just like Ronald Reagan!"
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | September 5, 2013
It's no secret that the right is going through what some call a healthy debate and what others see as an identity crisis. For some, the solution to what ails conservatism requires a sudden philosophical shift leftward to win back the last Rockefeller Republicans, presumably hanging on in nursing homes like stranded Japanese fighters who haven't gotten word that World War II is over. Others argue that Republicans must shake off the heresies of moderation and compromise and accept the unalloyed true faith of 100 percent conservatism.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 23, 2013
The release of the last 340 hours of the Nixon White House tapes adds little to what we know by now about the first American president to resign. Indeed, the final installment doesn't tell us much more than we should have known about him long before the first tapes were ever released. Except for documenting his excessive use of profanity, his contempt for many political figures including those working for him, and his galloping personal insecurity, the real Richard Nixon was always there to be seen.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | June 3, 2013
"Could people like Bob Dole, even Ronald Reagan -- could you make it in today's Republican Party?" Chris Wallace of "Fox News Sunday" asked former Senate Majority Leader and 1996 GOP presidential nominee Bob Dole. "I doubt it," Mr. Dole replied. "Reagan wouldn't have made it. Certainly, Nixon couldn't have made it, because he had ideas and -- We might have made it, but I doubt it. " Let me state up front that I have incredible respect and admiration for Mr. Dole. He's an American hero and was a politician of undisputed integrity.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | April 13, 2013
MANCHESTER, England -- There is a story about Margaret Thatcher that is probably apocryphal but speaks volumes about the strength of Britain's first female prime minister, who died Monday at age 87. Following her election in 1979, the story goes that Mrs. Thatcher took her all-male cabinet out to dinner. The waiter asked what she would like. "I'll have the beef," she said. The waiter asked, "What about the vegetables?" "They'll have the same," Mrs. Thatcher replied. "Thatcher Saved Britain," read a headline in the Daily Telegraph.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 28, 2012
As the 2012 Republican National Convention gathers in Tampa, I find my thoughts going back nearly half a century, to San Francisco in 1964. It was the first political convention I covered as a reporter, and it was the one at which Sen. Barry Goldwater of Arizona was nominated for president. Then, as now, the air was filled with far-right conservative demands for restraints in the size and reach of government, capsulated in Goldwater's rousing call to the delegates: "I would remind you that extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice.
NEWS
June 14, 2012
Your editorial ("Doing better than 'fine,'" June 12) was correct in mildly chastising President Barack Obama for not being upbeat enough about the record of the private sector during his administration. You correctly cited the mess he inherited form the Republicans. You also pointed out Ronald Reagan as an example. The Republicans, including Mitt Romney, always say this president is doing a terrible job on the economy and long for the days of Ronald Reagan's performance in this area.
NEWS
By William Neikirk and William Neikirk,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 6, 2004
WASHINGTON - President Ronald Reagan inherited a bad economy in the 1980s and made it better. That legacy endeared him to many Americans, but what he did and how he did it remain highly controversial two decades later. In slashing tax rates, building up the Pentagon budget and pushing deregulation, Reagan put his country and his party on a new economic path. And now, in a new century, the same battles over his economic philosophy are being fought again. The Republican Party has embraced the Reagan tax-cutting message as party dogma, emphasizing a lighter tax burden over reducing deficits.
NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Robert Timberg,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 6, 2004
WASHINGTON - Once, after a news conference, Ronald Reagan returned to the Oval Office where his senior advisers were waiting to tell him he had gone too far in flatly ruling out a tax increase. He needed to leave himself some "wiggle room," they said, so he would have space to maneuver in the congressional battle then looming. Silently fuming, Reagan heard them out. One of the aides drafted a short statement backing off slightly from what the president had just told reporters. Reagan grabbed the paper from the aide and snatched a pen from his desk so fiercely that the inkstand went flying.
NEWS
By Mike Collins | February 6, 2012
Every Republican presidential candidate claims to be the heir to Ronald Reagan's legacy. For years, Republican partisans have carried Reagan's memory before them as the ancient Israelites carried the Ark of the Covenant. Just invoking his name proved your ideological purity, and would smite the dreaded RINO (Republican in name only). Problem is, those who most fervently claim to adhere to Ronald Reagan's principles don't seem to understand Reagan's greatest principle: decency. Ronald Reagan practically has been deified as a small government, anti-tax, pro-life, all-American conservative who never compromised his principles.
NEWS
November 16, 2011
Your editorial "Fixing the Messenger" (Nov. 12) was the best thing I have read in The Sun for a long time. I have long maintained that Ronald Reagan's bizarre economic policies caused untold harm to the nation when he was president, and they continue to haunt us today. Jack Kinstlinger, Baltimore
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