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By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2011
"Diner" has resonated with Baltimore-connected writers and moviemakers across the popular and literary spectrum. Here are some of their reactions to the movie's 30th anniversary. The film "shined a light on a time in Baltimore that I was not that familiar with, much the same as my earlier movies may have done to Barry. We later discussed the fact that even though Barry and I grew up five Beltway exits away from each other, I never met a Jewish person until high school and he told me he didn't realize everybody wasn't a Jew until about the same time in his youth.
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By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2011
"Diner" has resonated with Baltimore-connected writers and moviemakers across the popular and literary spectrum. Here are some of their reactions to the movie's 30th anniversary. The film "shined a light on a time in Baltimore that I was not that familiar with, much the same as my earlier movies may have done to Barry. We later discussed the fact that even though Barry and I grew up five Beltway exits away from each other, I never met a Jewish person until high school and he told me he didn't realize everybody wasn't a Jew until about the same time in his youth.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 20, 2003
Ron Shelton has written and directed a string of the best sports films ever made. They include famous ones such as the sexy, elegiac baseball classic Bull Durham, the raffish street-basketball smash White Men Can't Jump and the slapstick golf romance Tin Cup. But just as good or better is the barely released boxing comedy-drama Play It to the Bone - a movie that if made by a Frenchman like Bertrand Blier, would have been hailed as a daring look at the...
NEWS
April 1, 2007
MARYLAND A boon to watermen Maryland set up the Oyster Recovery Partnership more than a decade ago to revive the bay's dwindling oyster population, which had been ravaged by disease and overfishing. But the aim of the program has shifted to creating income for watermen instead of bringing back the oysters. pg 1a Schools target gang violence City school officials have drafted a safety plan to address the upswing in student gang violence. Interim city schools chief Charlene Cooper Boston has earmarked an extra $1 million for more police and $1.8 million for hall monitors in her budget, which was recently approved by the city school board.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 4, 2001
Anyone who's imagined painting a dirty grin on a public monument should relish the hilarious and monumental performance Tommy Lee Jones gives in writer-director Ron Shelton's bizarrely moving "Cobb" - a 1994 production that is still the funniest, raunchiest biopic yet made about an American idol. I made "Cobb" my selection for the Maryland Film Festival's "Critical Advocacy" program because Shelton is one of my favorite moviemakers and "Cobb" is his most audacious and least-seen movie.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2000
"Play It to the Bone" is Ron Shelton on autopilot. Shelton, the gifted writer-director of such sports-as-life mainstays as "Bull Durham," "White Men Can't Jump" and "Tin Cup," loves making films where the jocks do battle with words as much as with their muscles. At his best -- and films don't come much better than 1988's "Bull Durham," where Kevin Costner and Susan Sarandon made baseball seem exciting, intellectual and sexy -- the results are lighthearted, character-driven valentines to the ethos of sport, propelled by literate scripts that reveal as much about the people who engage in sports as about the sports themselves.
NEWS
April 1, 2007
MARYLAND A boon to watermen Maryland set up the Oyster Recovery Partnership more than a decade ago to revive the bay's dwindling oyster population, which had been ravaged by disease and overfishing. But the aim of the program has shifted to creating income for watermen instead of bringing back the oysters. pg 1a Schools target gang violence City school officials have drafted a safety plan to address the upswing in student gang violence. Interim city schools chief Charlene Cooper Boston has earmarked an extra $1 million for more police and $1.8 million for hall monitors in her budget, which was recently approved by the city school board.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | April 1, 2007
It's a long season, and you got to trust it. I've tried 'em all -- I really have -- and the only church that truly feeds the soul, day in, day out, is the Church of Baseball. SO SAYS ANNIE SAVOY, THE hyper-literate and earthy muse of the minor league Durham Bulls, played by Susan Sarandon in Bull Durham, writer / director Ron Shelton's classic baseball film. Beginning this week, millions will join Annie's congregation, as they do each year, in cathedrals from Camden Yards to Fenway Park.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 13, 2003
The elaborate chase at the climax of Hollywood Homicide rouses both belly laughs and goose bumps. It's like Bullitt and The French Connection transplanted to Hollywood Boulevard and crossed with everything from Blue Thunder to The Bicycle Thief. It's the ideal capper for a cop comedy with a refreshingly wry, adult and humane attitude. The director, Ron Shelton (Bull Durham, Tin Cup), and his star, Harrison Ford, prove that all you need to revitalize shootouts, interrogation and forensics - the narrative paraphernalia played for tired chills and bad jokes on most TV police shows - is the talent (and willingness)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 9, 2001
Whether she was calling Nashville "the funniest epic vision of America ever to reach the screen" or the 1978 Invasion of the Body Snatchers "the best movie of its kind ever made," Pauline Kael always meant exactly what she said. When I think of her critical vocabulary, I recall slang she used so distinctively that she might as well have patented it -- like "zizzy." Or words she used in combina-tions that were uniquely hers, like "rotten-rich." She was too wary of theory and repetition to rely on critical catchphrases or inject her words with inflated meaning.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | April 1, 2007
It's a long season, and you got to trust it. I've tried 'em all -- I really have -- and the only church that truly feeds the soul, day in, day out, is the Church of Baseball. SO SAYS ANNIE SAVOY, THE hyper-literate and earthy muse of the minor league Durham Bulls, played by Susan Sarandon in Bull Durham, writer / director Ron Shelton's classic baseball film. Beginning this week, millions will join Annie's congregation, as they do each year, in cathedrals from Camden Yards to Fenway Park.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 13, 2003
The elaborate chase at the climax of Hollywood Homicide rouses both belly laughs and goose bumps. It's like Bullitt and The French Connection transplanted to Hollywood Boulevard and crossed with everything from Blue Thunder to The Bicycle Thief. It's the ideal capper for a cop comedy with a refreshingly wry, adult and humane attitude. The director, Ron Shelton (Bull Durham, Tin Cup), and his star, Harrison Ford, prove that all you need to revitalize shootouts, interrogation and forensics - the narrative paraphernalia played for tired chills and bad jokes on most TV police shows - is the talent (and willingness)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 20, 2003
Ron Shelton has written and directed a string of the best sports films ever made. They include famous ones such as the sexy, elegiac baseball classic Bull Durham, the raffish street-basketball smash White Men Can't Jump and the slapstick golf romance Tin Cup. But just as good or better is the barely released boxing comedy-drama Play It to the Bone - a movie that if made by a Frenchman like Bertrand Blier, would have been hailed as a daring look at the...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 9, 2001
Whether she was calling Nashville "the funniest epic vision of America ever to reach the screen" or the 1978 Invasion of the Body Snatchers "the best movie of its kind ever made," Pauline Kael always meant exactly what she said. When I think of her critical vocabulary, I recall slang she used so distinctively that she might as well have patented it -- like "zizzy." Or words she used in combina-tions that were uniquely hers, like "rotten-rich." She was too wary of theory and repetition to rely on critical catchphrases or inject her words with inflated meaning.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 4, 2001
Anyone who's imagined painting a dirty grin on a public monument should relish the hilarious and monumental performance Tommy Lee Jones gives in writer-director Ron Shelton's bizarrely moving "Cobb" - a 1994 production that is still the funniest, raunchiest biopic yet made about an American idol. I made "Cobb" my selection for the Maryland Film Festival's "Critical Advocacy" program because Shelton is one of my favorite moviemakers and "Cobb" is his most audacious and least-seen movie.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2000
"Play It to the Bone" is Ron Shelton on autopilot. Shelton, the gifted writer-director of such sports-as-life mainstays as "Bull Durham," "White Men Can't Jump" and "Tin Cup," loves making films where the jocks do battle with words as much as with their muscles. At his best -- and films don't come much better than 1988's "Bull Durham," where Kevin Costner and Susan Sarandon made baseball seem exciting, intellectual and sexy -- the results are lighthearted, character-driven valentines to the ethos of sport, propelled by literate scripts that reveal as much about the people who engage in sports as about the sports themselves.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | January 12, 2007
"Everyone assumes great art has to be gloomy," writer-director Ron Shelton noted shortly after he made Bull Durham, a movie that proves great art can be fun. The over-praise of films such as Babel, Children of Men and Notes on a Scandal bears out his complaint. They're brilliantly made. But they're also dramatically flimsy or monotonous. In Babel, two boys playing with a rifle in Morocco set off a chain reaction of near-catastrophes in Japan, the United States and Mexico. It's like Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon played with life-or-death stakes and a soul-crushing existential overlay.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | August 16, 1996
The ghost of "Bull Durham" has come back to haunt movie theaters. Same director. Same star. Same ballpark. Or the same golf course, as you might say for "Tin Cup."Like "Bull Durham" before it, "Tin Cup" takes a talented underachiever and makes him a hero. Kevin Costner is in the title role (there's an elaborate and rather pointless explanation of his nickname), and the Charm is back.This time around, he's not talking in a bad English accent or growing gills. He's easygoing, funny, cute and nice.
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