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By CHRIS KALTENBACH | November 25, 2008
Starring Russell Crowe, Tom Hanks, Kurt Russell Directed by Ron Howard Universal Home Video $39.98 *** 1/2 Ron Howard is far from Hollywood's most consistent director. He can be awful, as in 2000's charmless The Grinch. But when he's on, he's very on. This four-film, eight-disc collection, filled with deleted scenes, documentaries and other extras, brings together two of his best, 2001's A Beautiful Mind, which won a Best Picture Oscar, and 1995's Apollo 13, which should have. It includes the middling Backdraft (1991)
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
While hundreds of thousands of visitors are expected to descend on Baltimore this weekend to see the ships, fireworks and cannon fire of the "Star-Spangled Spectacular," Jessica Damen is staying home. The festivities are happening outside Damen's door, so the Federal Hill woman decided she'd throw a party and watch the Blue Angels and the tall ships from her rooftop deck. Residents of Federal Hill and Locust Point say they've grown used to the gridlocked traffic, elusive parking and other effects that come with the big weekend events in their neighborhood.
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FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | March 25, 1994
Gregory Billy, the morning manager at Wayne's Bar-B-Que at Harborplace, was surprised to see a familiar famous face having breakfast at Wayne's this past Tuesday. He turned out to be one of Hollywood's best known redheads, film director Ron Howard, who was in Baltimore with his family to visit Harborplace and its attractions. According to Billy, Howard's family looks like him -- even his wife -- red hair and all.Harborplace is a favorite place for celebrity visitors, Wayne Brokke, owner of Wayne's Bar-B-Que, says Linda Hamilton, Howie Mandel, Charlie Sheen and Tom Berenger, have tasted his food over the past six months.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | November 25, 2008
Starring Russell Crowe, Tom Hanks, Kurt Russell Directed by Ron Howard Universal Home Video $39.98 *** 1/2 Ron Howard is far from Hollywood's most consistent director. He can be awful, as in 2000's charmless The Grinch. But when he's on, he's very on. This four-film, eight-disc collection, filled with deleted scenes, documentaries and other extras, brings together two of his best, 2001's A Beautiful Mind, which won a Best Picture Oscar, and 1995's Apollo 13, which should have. It includes the middling Backdraft (1991)
FEATURES
By Philip Wuntch and Philip Wuntch,Dallas Morning News | May 31, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Ron Howard had wanted to make a film with Tom Cruise for several years. And he had seen the Australian thriller "Dead Calm" and was impressed with its female star, Nicole Kidman.He told producer Brian Grazer he would like them to star in his epic of Irish immigrants, "Far and Away." But he wondered if they would be agreeable to working together so soon after "Days of Thunder.""I had to sit Ron down and explain to him very carefully that they most likely would be very agreeable because they were engaged to be married," Mr. Grazer says.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and By Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 25, 2001
A Beautiful Mind is filled with wonder, poignancy, suspense, passion and revelation. But most of all, it's filled with a sense of achievement - of a man who spent his life doing what everyone told him was impossible, and of a filmmaker exercising creative muscles we never knew he had. Based - loosely - on the life of mathematician and Nobel laureate John Forbes Nash Jr., A Beautiful Mind offers Russell Crowe what certainly should be his second straight Oscar-nominated...
FEATURES
By George M. Thomas and George M. Thomas,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 27, 2003
Ron Howard has heard the criticism. His films are too commercial, sometimes bordering on schmaltzy and manipulative. Ultimately, however, it doesn't matter to him, and apparently it doesn't matter to the audiences who flock to see his movies. Count the hits: A Beautiful Mind, Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas, Ransom and Apollo 13. Yes, there have been some disappointments such as EdTV, a film about a cable channel devoted to the life of an ordinary man, which seems remarkably prescient today; and Far and Away, a film starring Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman that explored Irish immigration at the turn of the 20th century.
FEATURES
By RON DICKER and RON DICKER,HARTFORD COURANT | May 18, 2006
CANNES, France -- Ron Howard said don't see his movie, The Da Vinci Code; a nun kissed the red carpet and recited a rosary; and a man dressed like a Louis XIV dandy with cats perched on his arm entertained strollers along the Croisette. Just another opening day at the Cannes Film Festival, which yesterday welcomed the world for its 59th edition. Less-than-divine early reviews of The Da Vinci Code had director Howard turning the other cheek during an afternoon press conference. He said he expected more "positive adjectives" to accompany the religious thriller before its U.S. release tomorrow.
FEATURES
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2000
Ron Howard Universal Pictures Hollywood, Calif. Dear Ron: Just got back from seeing your movie "Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas" and have one question for you. Have you read the book? I have. About 200 gazillion times and counting. It's my 4-year-old daughter's favorite. We've read it so often we've committed it to memory. Sometimes, I'll come home and find her grinchishly humming or perhaps slithering and slunking. She's picked up a lot of habits. We'll leave it at that. Anyway, you've probably seen your film's bad reviews.
NEWS
August 19, 2007
On Friday, August 10, 2007, THOMAS BROME HOWARD of Ridge, MD, beloved husband of Scotty Stiles Howard, father of Thomas Howard, Jr., Ron Howard, Mark Howard, Allen Howard, Marguerite Morrison and Julie Berger; brother of John Spence Howard, Jr., Also survived by eleven grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren. All services will be private. Memorial contributions may be made to your local Duck's Unlimited Chapter or Trinity Episcopal Church, P.O.Box 207, St. Mary's City, MD, 20686. Arrangements by BRINSFIELD FUNERAL HOME, P.A., Leonardtown, MD, 20650.
NEWS
August 19, 2007
On Friday, August 10, 2007, THOMAS BROME HOWARD of Ridge, MD, beloved husband of Scotty Stiles Howard, father of Thomas Howard, Jr., Ron Howard, Mark Howard, Allen Howard, Marguerite Morrison and Julie Berger; brother of John Spence Howard, Jr., Also survived by eleven grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren. All services will be private. Memorial contributions may be made to your local Duck's Unlimited Chapter or Trinity Episcopal Church, P.O.Box 207, St. Mary's City, MD, 20686. Arrangements by BRINSFIELD FUNERAL HOME, P.A., Leonardtown, MD, 20650.
FEATURES
By RON DICKER and RON DICKER,HARTFORD COURANT | May 18, 2006
CANNES, France -- Ron Howard said don't see his movie, The Da Vinci Code; a nun kissed the red carpet and recited a rosary; and a man dressed like a Louis XIV dandy with cats perched on his arm entertained strollers along the Croisette. Just another opening day at the Cannes Film Festival, which yesterday welcomed the world for its 59th edition. Less-than-divine early reviews of The Da Vinci Code had director Howard turning the other cheek during an afternoon press conference. He said he expected more "positive adjectives" to accompany the religious thriller before its U.S. release tomorrow.
FEATURES
By George M. Thomas and George M. Thomas,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 27, 2003
Ron Howard has heard the criticism. His films are too commercial, sometimes bordering on schmaltzy and manipulative. Ultimately, however, it doesn't matter to him, and apparently it doesn't matter to the audiences who flock to see his movies. Count the hits: A Beautiful Mind, Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas, Ransom and Apollo 13. Yes, there have been some disappointments such as EdTV, a film about a cable channel devoted to the life of an ordinary man, which seems remarkably prescient today; and Far and Away, a film starring Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman that explored Irish immigration at the turn of the 20th century.
FEATURES
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 17, 2002
The Weas-el is dead, buuuddy. But Pauly Shore lives on. And like a bad high school yearbook photo, Shore's breakthrough shtick is something he's having a tough time getting most of America to forget -- especially Hollywood. Shore first gained fame as an early-'90s surfer dude who relied on words like "nugs" and "stoney" to express his endless appreciation for large-breasted women. The king of MTV's spring-break bikini contests eventually crossed over to the big screen, luring thousands of teen-agers to blow their allowances on screwball comedies like Encino Man and Son in Law. But Shore, 34, sounds less like a surfer and more like the road-weary stand-up comedian he is. "I'm just me," Shore says.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and By Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 25, 2001
A Beautiful Mind is filled with wonder, poignancy, suspense, passion and revelation. But most of all, it's filled with a sense of achievement - of a man who spent his life doing what everyone told him was impossible, and of a filmmaker exercising creative muscles we never knew he had. Based - loosely - on the life of mathematician and Nobel laureate John Forbes Nash Jr., A Beautiful Mind offers Russell Crowe what certainly should be his second straight Oscar-nominated...
FEATURES
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2000
Ron Howard Universal Pictures Hollywood, Calif. Dear Ron: Just got back from seeing your movie "Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas" and have one question for you. Have you read the book? I have. About 200 gazillion times and counting. It's my 4-year-old daughter's favorite. We've read it so often we've committed it to memory. Sometimes, I'll come home and find her grinchishly humming or perhaps slithering and slunking. She's picked up a lot of habits. We'll leave it at that. Anyway, you've probably seen your film's bad reviews.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | March 3, 1992
It's all there: Henry Winkler and Marion Ross necking on the set of "Happy Days"; Winkler explaining how ABC wouldn't let his character, Arthur "Fonzie" Fonzarelli, wear a leather jacket at first because network executives thought the jacket made him look "too much like a hood"; Robin Williams' first network TV appearance as an alien named Mork visiting the Cunninghams of Milwaukee.Yes, it's all there in the "Happy Days Reunion," at 9:30 tonight on WJZ (Channel 13). But, as promising as those three moments might sound, that's as good as it gets.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | June 26, 1995
Here's a super trivia test, all answered in a single night's programming: What memorable TV series' lead character made his first appearance on "Make Room for Daddy," in an episode getting a rare repeat tonight? (Hint: The series that featured the character also co-starred a child actor who grew up to be a celebrity, who can be seen in another show tonight.) For the answer, see Nick At Nite item below.* "A Day With . . ." (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- This unusual special has no host and no fixed script, for each participant was given the opportunity to choose a setting in which to appear.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 17, 2000
Dr. Seuss, rest his onomatopoetic soul, can't be happy about this. "Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas," with an out-of-control Jim Carrey as that nasty creature so mean to all those Whos down in Whoville, misfires on nearly every possible level. But nowhere does director Ron Howard's take on this most magic of magical tales err more egregiously than in its decision to make those darling little Whos the real heavies. In the original story, written by Ted Geisel (aka Dr. Seuss) in 1957 and made into a perfectly wonderful 20-minute cartoon in 1966, the Grinch is this mean old guy who lives atop a mountain, scowling at all the happy Whos in the town below.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | November 5, 1999
DOROTHY Brannan shakes my hand. I feel soft skin and a plastic shoehorn. The shoehorn feels as if it's been hooked over Dorothy Brannan's thumb and pressed against her palm for maybe half a century.Turns out, my guess is a little short.Dorothy Brannan has been selling shoes for 56 years. She started at the Hess Shoes on Howard Street in 1943, and she'll close out her career this holiday season when the company goes out of business after 127 years."Sales lady" is what she calls herself."I always sold ladies' shoes," Mrs. Brannan tells me during a midday break at the Hess store in Towson Town Center.
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