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NEWS
November 19, 1997
RON CAREY could have been the Teamsters' savior. He rose to union president as the honorable reformer who would redeem the powerful labor organization from its inglorious past. His mission was to vanquish the images of Jimmy Hoffa and mob connections that tarnished victories the Teamsters won for American workers.But instead of saving the Teamsters, Mr. Carey now has deepened the union's poor image. Federal officials found that his campaign for re-election illegally used more than $700,000 from his union's treasury last year.
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NEWS
December 14, 2008
RON CAREY, 72 Former Teamsters president Ron Carey, the former Teamsters president who pledged to rid the union of mob corruption but was later forced from leadership in a financial scandal, died Thursday at New York Hospital Medical Center of Queens of complications from lung cancer, his son Daniel Carey said. After a stint in the Marines, Mr. Carey joined the Teamsters in 1956 while working as a driver for United Parcel Service. He became president of a local union post in New York in 1967 on a platform of challenging corrupt leadership in the organization.
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NEWS
December 14, 2008
RON CAREY, 72 Former Teamsters president Ron Carey, the former Teamsters president who pledged to rid the union of mob corruption but was later forced from leadership in a financial scandal, died Thursday at New York Hospital Medical Center of Queens of complications from lung cancer, his son Daniel Carey said. After a stint in the Marines, Mr. Carey joined the Teamsters in 1956 while working as a driver for United Parcel Service. He became president of a local union post in New York in 1967 on a platform of challenging corrupt leadership in the organization.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 27, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Tom Leedham, head of a Teamsters local in Oregon, is taking on the biggest name in labor: Hoffa. Leedham is seeking to unseat James P. Hoffa, the president of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters and the son of the nation's most famous - some would say infamous - union leader, James R. Hoffa, who disappeared in 1975. Even though Leedham faces an uphill battle, on Friday night he was able to claim a victory in one round at least - Hoffa dodged the one debate that was scheduled between the two sides.
NEWS
By Kenneth N. Weine | October 16, 1997
CHAIRMAN Fred Thompson has the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee once again looking for fund-raising misdeeds. Now the committee is looking into the relationship between the Teamsters union and the Democrats.But there is more than mischief to learn from the Teamsters. The Senate could find a great way to reform campaign financing by examining the handling of the recent Teamsters elections.That's right. Our federal officeholders can find a way to improve democracy by emulating the Teamsters.
BUSINESS
By BOSTON GLOBE | July 28, 1998
Eighteen months after suspicions surfaced about the 1996 Teamsters election, a federally appointed board yesterday expelled President Ron Carey from the union for an illegal fund-raising scheme that became the deciding factor in his narrow re-election over James P. Hoffa.Carey has repeatedly denied knowing anything about the scheme that directed $885,000 in union funds to third-party political groups to benefit his campaign in the final frantic days before the election.But in yesterday's ruling, the Independent Review Board found that Carey was responsible for the plot.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 27, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Tom Leedham, head of a Teamsters local in Oregon, is taking on the biggest name in labor: Hoffa. Leedham is seeking to unseat James P. Hoffa, the president of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters and the son of the nation's most famous - some would say infamous - union leader, James R. Hoffa, who disappeared in 1975. Even though Leedham faces an uphill battle, on Friday night he was able to claim a victory in one round at least - Hoffa dodged the one debate that was scheduled between the two sides.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 1, 1998
As soon as James P. Hoffa entered the smoke-filled bar in South Philadelphia, 80 Teamsters burst into wild applause, with several rushing up to ask him for an autograph."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 6, 1998
ALEXANDRIA, Va. -- James P. Hoffa won election yesterday to the presidency of the Teamsters union, the job that his powerful father held for more than a decade, after the main opponent conceded defeat.With the concession by Tom Leedham, Hoffa, a labor lawyer from Detroit, will take the helm of International Brotherhood of Teamsters, one of the nation's largest unions. The victory marked a return of the Hoffa name to the head of a union that federal officials had long called the most corrupt, particularly when Hoffa's father, James R. Hoffa, led the organization from 1957 to 1971.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | November 27, 1997
One day after Ron Carey stepped down as president of the Teamsters, supporters of James P. Hoffa say they would ask the federal government to remove the rest of Carey's slate of officers from their elected union posts.Richard Leebove, a Hoffa aide based in Detroit, said yesterday his office would ask Mary Jo White, U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York, to form a coalition government to run the union until a new election is held."Basically, we are saying that the people who are currently in office and running the union really shouldn't be there," he said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 6, 1998
ALEXANDRIA, Va. -- James P. Hoffa won election yesterday to the presidency of the Teamsters union, the job that his powerful father held for more than a decade, after the main opponent conceded defeat.With the concession by Tom Leedham, Hoffa, a labor lawyer from Detroit, will take the helm of International Brotherhood of Teamsters, one of the nation's largest unions. The victory marked a return of the Hoffa name to the head of a union that federal officials had long called the most corrupt, particularly when Hoffa's father, James R. Hoffa, led the organization from 1957 to 1971.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 1, 1998
As soon as James P. Hoffa entered the smoke-filled bar in South Philadelphia, 80 Teamsters burst into wild applause, with several rushing up to ask him for an autograph."
BUSINESS
By BOSTON GLOBE | July 28, 1998
Eighteen months after suspicions surfaced about the 1996 Teamsters election, a federally appointed board yesterday expelled President Ron Carey from the union for an illegal fund-raising scheme that became the deciding factor in his narrow re-election over James P. Hoffa.Carey has repeatedly denied knowing anything about the scheme that directed $885,000 in union funds to third-party political groups to benefit his campaign in the final frantic days before the election.But in yesterday's ruling, the Independent Review Board found that Carey was responsible for the plot.
NEWS
December 6, 1997
Neighborhoods left out of home sales listI am responding to The Sunday Sun's real estate article, Nov. 16, featuring single family home sales within Baltimore City. To my dismay, the Highlandtown/Patterson Park neighborhoods have again been omitted as viable home ownership sites within city limits.Although Highlandtown/Patterson Park has always been considered one of the more stable neighborhoods in Southeast Baltimore, it has recently been under siege from block-busting.It is apparent that the real estate industry is purposely marketing the expensive Canton and Butchers Hill areas full force to prospective home buyers while downplaying the nearby affordable housing available in the Highlandtown/Patterson Park area.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | November 27, 1997
One day after Ron Carey stepped down as president of the Teamsters, supporters of James P. Hoffa say they would ask the federal government to remove the rest of Carey's slate of officers from their elected union posts.Richard Leebove, a Hoffa aide based in Detroit, said yesterday his office would ask Mary Jo White, U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York, to form a coalition government to run the union until a new election is held."Basically, we are saying that the people who are currently in office and running the union really shouldn't be there," he said.
NEWS
November 19, 1997
RON CAREY could have been the Teamsters' savior. He rose to union president as the honorable reformer who would redeem the powerful labor organization from its inglorious past. His mission was to vanquish the images of Jimmy Hoffa and mob connections that tarnished victories the Teamsters won for American workers.But instead of saving the Teamsters, Mr. Carey now has deepened the union's poor image. Federal officials found that his campaign for re-election illegally used more than $700,000 from his union's treasury last year.
NEWS
December 6, 1997
Neighborhoods left out of home sales listI am responding to The Sunday Sun's real estate article, Nov. 16, featuring single family home sales within Baltimore City. To my dismay, the Highlandtown/Patterson Park neighborhoods have again been omitted as viable home ownership sites within city limits.Although Highlandtown/Patterson Park has always been considered one of the more stable neighborhoods in Southeast Baltimore, it has recently been under siege from block-busting.It is apparent that the real estate industry is purposely marketing the expensive Canton and Butchers Hill areas full force to prospective home buyers while downplaying the nearby affordable housing available in the Highlandtown/Patterson Park area.
NEWS
By Kenneth N. Weine | October 16, 1997
CHAIRMAN Fred Thompson has the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee once again looking for fund-raising misdeeds. Now the committee is looking into the relationship between the Teamsters union and the Democrats.But there is more than mischief to learn from the Teamsters. The Senate could find a great way to reform campaign financing by examining the handling of the recent Teamsters elections.That's right. Our federal officeholders can find a way to improve democracy by emulating the Teamsters.
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