Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRommel
IN THE NEWS

Rommel

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 3, 2004
On December 29, 2003, WILLIAM NEIL ROMMEL, SR. "Bill", age 74; beloved husband of Sandra Rommel, of Pikesville, MD and devoted father of Diane Ingrahm, of New Freedom, PA, William Neil Rommel, Jr., of Big Island, VA, Susan Billet, of Red Lion, PA and Jennifer Mettrick, of Towson, MD, passed away. Also survived by seven grandchildren, Kevin Foxwell, Jeffrey Foxwell, Molly Rommel, Will Rommel, III, Jeremy Billet, Justin Billet and Matthew Mettrick; four great-grandchildren, Andrew Foxwell, Abby Foxwell, Avery Foxwell and Emily Foxwell; two brothers, Oscar Rommel and John Rommel and two sisters, Mary Blake and Martha Wells.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2010
Thomas Frederick Rommel Sr., a retired Bethlehem Steel Corp. foreman and World War II veteran, died Dec. 14 of Alzheimer's disease at Coastal Hospice at the Lake in Salisbury. The former longtime Hamilton resident was 87. Mr. Rommel was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. He was a 1941 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. During World War II, he enlisted in the Navy and served aboard ships as a radar man. He served in the Atlantic Theater and participated in the D-Day invasion.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2000
Edwin Rommel Jr., 76, school administrator Edwin Americus Rommel Jr. generally wasn't known to students in Baltimore County public schools. But as the person who advised the school superintendent whether to cancel classes during bad weather, he might have been the most popular administrator. Mr. Rommel died Wednesday of cardiac arrest at Noble House Nursing Home in Charles Village. He was 76 and lived in Anneslie. It was Mr. Rommel's advice to the superintendent of schools that would lead to the decision to cancel classes during inclement weather, giving students an unscheduled holiday.
NEWS
April 1, 2008
On March 29, 2008 Sister MARY MARGARET ROMMAL, SUSC, 86, whose religious name was Sister Paul Winifred, passed away at St. Agnes Hospital in Baltimore, MD. She is survived by her Holy Union Sisters, her sister-in-law Lorraine Rommal, her cousin, Marie Schiele and her husband Bob of Catonsville, her dear niece Patty Keiser, and several other nieces, nephews, grandnieces and grandnephews. She was preceded in death by her parents, the late Albert and Dolores (Lawrence) Rommal and her brothers John Patrick and Albert Paul Rommal as well as her aunt, Sister Mary Florence Lawrence, SUSC, (Sister Joseph Winifred)
NEWS
By Jennifer Keats and Jennifer Keats,Contributing writer | May 16, 1991
Meridian Nursing Center resident Pauline Clark, 77, sat in a wheelchair last week and smiled as she grabbed the arm of the woman sitting next to her.A year ago, the simple squeeze on her physical therapist's arm wouldn't have been possible.In December of 1989, Clark was struck with a neurological disorder, Chronic Inflammatory Demyelineating Polyneuropothy. The disease, which attacks the nervous system, rendered her a paraplegic.Clark,a retired deputy clerk was sent to Holy Cross, a rehabilitation center in Washington to have her blood "flushed."
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | June 19, 1997
HAVRE DE GRACE -- Most of us recognize a rommel crabtree when we see one, even if the name escapes us. Almost every community has a rommel crabtree, and those that don't, need one. This is self-evident, although it's a fact that whenever a new one pops up, quite a few important people complain about it.In the generic sense, rommel crabtrees are like the dandelions that force themselves up through cracks in the paved sidewalks and then burst into bloom, making...
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | April 18, 1995
The Baltimore County Council narrowly approved last night a controversial bill requiring the licensing of roller-skating rinks.The seven-member council also repealed a 6-month-old hazardous waste disclosure law.The roller-rink bill was approved 4-3. Though it affects all such facilities in the county, its sponsor says it is aimed at Towson Skateland, where crowds of rowdy youths leaving the facility on winter weekend nights have disturbed neighbors, forced...
NEWS
By EDGAR L. JONES | November 10, 1992
The British marked the 50th anniversary of the Battle of El Alamein with a ceremony in Westminster Abbey that, according to the Associated Press, paid homage to the 72,500 dead on both sides of the 12-day battle in the Egyptian desert. The sons of the two opposing generals, Rommel and Montgomery, read Biblical passages that stressed brotherhood and peace. The ceremony was held well ahead of the actual battle date to accommodate Queen Elizabeth's schedule.A second commemorative gathering, larger and more cosmopolitan, occurred two days after the battle date.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | January 6, 1995
It might well have become a casualty of the internal wars of baseball, the owners and players forcing each other into a paralyzing headlock, but Baltimore's annual reception and dinner will continue as in the past.That means next Friday night the Maryland Professional Baseball Players Association and friends will gather for the 42nd time to stage their mid-winter banquet and oratorical session.General chairman Frank Sliwka and assistant John Rommel are staying the course through troublesome times.
SPORTS
December 28, 1993
American League home run champion Juan Gonzalez of the Texas Rangers and former Cincinnati Reds star Tony Perez headline the 41st annual Tops in Sports Banquet scheduled for Jan. 14 at Towson State University.They will be joined by Los Angeles Dodgers manager Tom Lasorda, Orioles manager Johnny Oates and pitchers Rick Sutcliffe and Fernando Valenzuela.The banquet begins with a reception at 6:15 p.m., followed by dinner and the program. Tickets are $45 and can be obtained by calling (410) 242-3552.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,Sun reporter | March 14, 2007
With one of the game's top scoring duos returning in senior attackmen Merrick Thomson and Frank Resetarits, the University at Albany figured it would click on offense in 2007. The Great Danes, off to a 4-0 start for the first time since their Division III days in 1993, averaged just under 12 goals per game last spring, and have averaged 13 this year. But the main reason No. 8 Albany has moved into the top 10 - first with a huge 8-7 win at Johns Hopkins in its season opener, next with last week's 13-7 drubbing of Delaware - is what is happening at the other end of the field.
NEWS
January 3, 2004
On December 29, 2003, WILLIAM NEIL ROMMEL, SR. "Bill", age 74; beloved husband of Sandra Rommel, of Pikesville, MD and devoted father of Diane Ingrahm, of New Freedom, PA, William Neil Rommel, Jr., of Big Island, VA, Susan Billet, of Red Lion, PA and Jennifer Mettrick, of Towson, MD, passed away. Also survived by seven grandchildren, Kevin Foxwell, Jeffrey Foxwell, Molly Rommel, Will Rommel, III, Jeremy Billet, Justin Billet and Matthew Mettrick; four great-grandchildren, Andrew Foxwell, Abby Foxwell, Avery Foxwell and Emily Foxwell; two brothers, Oscar Rommel and John Rommel and two sisters, Mary Blake and Martha Wells.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2000
Edwin Rommel Jr., 76, school administrator Edwin Americus Rommel Jr. generally wasn't known to students in Baltimore County public schools. But as the person who advised the school superintendent whether to cancel classes during bad weather, he might have been the most popular administrator. Mr. Rommel died Wednesday of cardiac arrest at Noble House Nursing Home in Charles Village. He was 76 and lived in Anneslie. It was Mr. Rommel's advice to the superintendent of schools that would lead to the decision to cancel classes during inclement weather, giving students an unscheduled holiday.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Gail Gibson and Eric Siegel and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2000
Ruling in a precedent-setting case involving fair housing laws, a federal judge in Baltimore has ordered the developer of an Anne Arundel County condominium project to pay $333,145 to make common areas accessible to the disabled and to retrofit individual units. The order by U.S. District Senior Judge Walter E. Black against LOB Inc., developer of the 156-unit Lions Gate condominium in Odenton, is in addition to a $240,000 settlement agreed to by Rommel Builders and John A. Rommel in the four-year-old suit brought by the fair housing advocacy group Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc. Black's order follows a weeklong trial in November to set damages, and comes a year after he found that the developer and builder of the 12-building garden apartment project had violated federal law by failing to make the units accessible towheelchair users.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1998
It started with icy glares and quickly escalated into the "e-mail wars."On one side stands Rommel Crabtree, an outspoken, self-described "ultra-radical" Harford County activist best known for battling illegal real estate signs. On the other, a group of residents who successfully fought to give voters a say on the most controversial local issue in years.Crabtree -- a man more accustomed to challenging the establishment -- says he has been labeled "Benedict Rommel" and ostracized by many of his former allies for his high-profile opposition to a referendum on comprehensive rezoning.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | June 19, 1997
HAVRE DE GRACE -- Most of us recognize a rommel crabtree when we see one, even if the name escapes us. Almost every community has a rommel crabtree, and those that don't, need one. This is self-evident, although it's a fact that whenever a new one pops up, quite a few important people complain about it.In the generic sense, rommel crabtrees are like the dandelions that force themselves up through cracks in the paved sidewalks and then burst into bloom, making...
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | April 6, 1997
Harford County activist Rommel Crabtree was recently seen carrying a sign instead of destroying it.Crabtree was picketing with supporters at the County Courthouse in Bel Air last month to protest criminal charges against him in the theft and destruction of illegal real estate signs.The computer consultant could receive a 15-year prison sentence in the unusual case that is being watched closely by activists and real estate companies statewide."Of course I don't want to go to jail," he said as demonstrators walked by him and drivers honked in support.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1998
It started with icy glares and quickly escalated into the "e-mail wars."On one side stands Rommel Crabtree, an outspoken, self-described "ultra-radical" Harford County activist best known for battling illegal real estate signs. On the other, a group of residents who successfully fought to give voters a say on the most controversial local issue in years.Crabtree -- a man more accustomed to challenging the establishment -- says he has been labeled "Benedict Rommel" and ostracized by many of his former allies for his high-profile opposition to a referendum on comprehensive rezoning.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | April 6, 1997
Harford County activist Rommel Crabtree was recently seen carrying a sign instead of destroying it.Crabtree was picketing with supporters at the County Courthouse in Bel Air last month to protest criminal charges against him in the theft and destruction of illegal real estate signs.The computer consultant could receive a 15-year prison sentence in the unusual case that is being watched closely by activists and real estate companies statewide."Of course I don't want to go to jail," he said as demonstrators walked by him and drivers honked in support.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.