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Romanticism

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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 31, 2000
Typically, romanticism is assumed to favor qualities the old school would ascribe to women -- softness, roundness and a pronounced emotionality. But the sort of romanticism Sergiu Comissiona evoked at the Meyerhoff last night suggested a far more enlightened view of femininity, one which emphasized strength and intelligence as much as grace and fervor. It was an unlikely program to offer such a lesson. Although Rachmaninoff's "Variations on a Theme by Paganini" clearly speaks as much to the mind as the heart, Tchaikovsky's Byronesque "Manfred" symphony usually emphasizes the score's implicit heroism above all else.
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Thomas F. Schaller | December 31, 2013
Around the holidays, I usually write a year-end review column. Highlights and lowlights from Maryland or American politics and culture - that sort of thing. But this year, as we pass from 2013 into 2014, I want to try something a little different. Let's time travel back 100 years, to New Year's Day 1914. Some American conservatives will be cheered by the very idea; they seem particularly fond of pre-New Deal governing arrangements. The United States hadn't yet fought two major wars, organized the Bretton Woods Conference that led to creation of the International Monetary Fund and World Bank, helped organize the United Nations, fought the Spanish influenza that killed more Americans in one year than both of those wars combined or passed the forerunner versions of what eventually blossomed into Social Security and Medicare.
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By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Contributing Writer Los Angeles Times Syndicate | August 29, 1993
"Grunge" and "deconstruction" may be the current buzzwords in the world of high couture. But in the world of interior design, at that same level and in this particular season, the operative adjective seems to be "romantic."It didn't take an expert eye to detect romanticism in the rooms featured in this year's Kips Bay Designer Show House. That high-style event in New York City is widely regarded as the annual trend-setter for American design and decoration.For those interested in what the taste-makers are up to, it's important to understand that romanticism is not itself a style, but rather a mood that can be conveyed through many different styles and a variety of period looks.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | June 16, 2007
Anyone allergic to romanticism in music may want to avoid the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's season finale, because a severe reaction could occur, but everyone else should find the experience rewarding. There are works by two hearty romantics from the 19th century, Brahms and Dvorak, and one from the 20th, Erich Wolfgang Korngold, who could give them - anyone, really - a run for their money in the melody department. Lyricism, passion and poetic impulses run freely through the program. If you go The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra performs at 8 tonight at the Music Center at Strathmore, 3 p.m. tomorrow at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | October 1, 2000
A lush exhibit reveals much about western views of women and the Third World. One of the blessings of postmodernism is that it has given new respectability to art which once had been consigned to the dustbin of history. Among the happiest beneficiaries of such revisionism are the 100 or so works that make up the exhibition "Noble Dreams, Wicked Pleasures: Orientalism in America 1870-1930," the big fall show that opens today at the Walters Art Gallery. It's easy on the eye, not too taxing intellectually and sexy as all get-out.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | June 6, 1999
I may as well admit at the outset that there are some painters whom I can admire but not quite love and that Frenchman Jean-August-Dominique Ingres is one of them.Ingres (1780-1867) was certainly a very great artist and his portraits are currently the subject of an impressive retrospective at Washington's National Gallery of Art. He was also something of a paradox.He had a marvelous gift for portraiture but, like the American expatriate John Singer Sargent, whose society portraits are on display in the hall adjacent to Ingres' at the National Gallery, he was forever complaining that portraits kept him from more important work.
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By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 29, 2005
The Bay Theatre Company opens the season's third and final production tonight with George Bernard Shaw's comic satire Arms and the Man, which satirizes the Victorian romanticism of Shaw's era. Shaw's comedy should enhance Bay Theatre's reputation for presenting intelligent theater. At a rehearsal last week, director Lucinda Merry-Browne expressed admiration for Shaw. "I'm drawn to this play because it is so funny and brings humor to the serious subject of war," she said. "Shaw has given us a very rich play that works on many levels.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | June 16, 2007
Anyone allergic to romanticism in music may want to avoid the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's season finale, because a severe reaction could occur, but everyone else should find the experience rewarding. There are works by two hearty romantics from the 19th century, Brahms and Dvorak, and one from the 20th, Erich Wolfgang Korngold, who could give them - anyone, really - a run for their money in the melody department. Lyricism, passion and poetic impulses run freely through the program. If you go The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra performs at 8 tonight at the Music Center at Strathmore, 3 p.m. tomorrow at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall.
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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 20, 2003
Tropical Storm Isabel delayed the start of the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra's post-Dunner era this fall when it left much of the capital city powerless in its wake. The ASO debut of Syracuse Symphony conductor Daniel Hege was washed away, along with a program of concertos by Mozart, Beethoven and Brahms that would have been the local orchestra's first offering since the departure of Maestro Leslie B. Dunner in the spring. Barring the appearance of any last-minute bad weather, the ASO's 2003-2004 season premiere will take place this weekend at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, when guest conductor Rossen Milanov, assistant conductor of the Philadelphia Orchestra, leads the players in a program of Mendelssohn, Rachmaninoff and Elgar.
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By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,Contributing Writer | September 20, 1993
"Bristle," New York-based choreographer Donald Byrd's new work that opened the Dance on the Edge series at Towson State University on Friday night, is a work with so much voltage that at times it's tantamount to putting your finger into an electric socket."Bristle" pulsates with energy, primarily sexual energy and Mr. Byrd's work investigates the war between the sexes, or at least the subtle skirmishes, with unabashed primal power. The result is a dance that is exciting, bold and ultimately satisfying.
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By Judah E. Adashi and Judah E. Adashi,special to the sun | December 8, 2006
Last January, New York Times music critic Allan Kozinn wrote that the Los Angeles Philharmonic "provides a foolproof recipe for any orchestra ... a charismatic conductor with fresh ideas and an openness to new musical currents; a concert hall that people want to go to and that musicians like to play in; programs that treat music not as a museum culture but as a lively continuum; and a management and board willing to support experimental urges." Kozinn might have been describing the Columbia Orchestra, which has thrived since 1999 under the thoughtful and inventive direction of Peabody alumnus Jason Love.
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By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 29, 2005
The Bay Theatre Company opens the season's third and final production tonight with George Bernard Shaw's comic satire Arms and the Man, which satirizes the Victorian romanticism of Shaw's era. Shaw's comedy should enhance Bay Theatre's reputation for presenting intelligent theater. At a rehearsal last week, director Lucinda Merry-Browne expressed admiration for Shaw. "I'm drawn to this play because it is so funny and brings humor to the serious subject of war," she said. "Shaw has given us a very rich play that works on many levels.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 21, 2005
Inaugural balls weren't the only action last night in Washington. A good-sized crowd turned out at the Kennedy Center Concert Hall for something different - the world premiere of Symphony No. 7 by Philip Glass and a collection of German folk poetry set to music by Gustav Mahler. Full of strongly evocative sounds, yet firmly rooted in the minimalist principles that propel all of his works, the new 35-minute, three-movement Glass piece aims high. The subtitle, A Toltec Symphony, refers to the ancient culture that thrived in the area from Texas and New Mexico down to Central America.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 11, 2004
With a surge of soul-on-sleeve, enveloping romanticism - and, perhaps, an extra degree of passion and commitment - the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra opened its penultimate season with Yuri Temirkanov as music director last night. Word of the conductor's decision to end his tenure in two years could have reached few people in the audience at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, but everyone onstage had learned about it a couple of days ago. I suspect the weight of that news accounted for at least some of the compelling results.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 20, 2003
Tropical Storm Isabel delayed the start of the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra's post-Dunner era this fall when it left much of the capital city powerless in its wake. The ASO debut of Syracuse Symphony conductor Daniel Hege was washed away, along with a program of concertos by Mozart, Beethoven and Brahms that would have been the local orchestra's first offering since the departure of Maestro Leslie B. Dunner in the spring. Barring the appearance of any last-minute bad weather, the ASO's 2003-2004 season premiere will take place this weekend at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, when guest conductor Rossen Milanov, assistant conductor of the Philadelphia Orchestra, leads the players in a program of Mendelssohn, Rachmaninoff and Elgar.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 12, 2003
Can hyper-romanticism still strike a chord in a post-modernist world? Sure, especially if that chord is from Jules Massenet's opera Werther. In 1892, the French composer transformed a literary landmark of German romanticism, Goethe's The Sorrows of Young Werther, into a work brimming with exquisite torment. His music shimmers, shudders and shouts in supremely lyrical fashion, making it possible to believe utterly in this sad tale of obsessive love. For a long time, Massenet owed his fame almost exclusively to his earlier Manon, about another doomed romance, but in recent decades, Werther has enjoyed rightful popularity.
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By Bethany M. Nikfar and Bethany M. Nikfar,Contributing Writer | July 16, 1995
Impresario Martin Feinstein continues to focus his passion for the arts on the Washington area. Mr. Feinstein recently joined the staff of the University of Maryland as senior consultant for the Maryland Center for the Performing Arts, a $107 million BTC state-of-the-art education and performance facility scheduled to open at the University of Maryland in 1997.After resigning as general director for the Washington Opera this spring, Mr. Feinstein now divides his time between the center and the opera, where he will serve as a consultant through the 1995-1996 season.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 12, 2003
Can hyper-romanticism still strike a chord in a post-modernist world? Sure, especially if that chord is from Jules Massenet's opera Werther. In 1892, the French composer transformed a literary landmark of German romanticism, Goethe's The Sorrows of Young Werther, into a work brimming with exquisite torment. His music shimmers, shudders and shouts in supremely lyrical fashion, making it possible to believe utterly in this sad tale of obsessive love. For a long time, Massenet owed his fame almost exclusively to his earlier Manon, about another doomed romance, but in recent decades, Werther has enjoyed rightful popularity.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 24, 2001
The Columbia Orchestra will head for the heart of Mother Russia on Saturday without ever leaving the friendly confines of Howard Community College's Smith Theatre. Music Director Jason Love has elected to conclude the orchestra's 2000-2001 season with a pair of works at the epicenter of Russian Romanticism: Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky's 5th Symphony and the sumptuously melodic "Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini" by Sergei Rachmaninoff. A short, hyperactive burst of American minimalism - John Adams' "Short Ride in a Fast Machine" - will round out the program.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | October 1, 2000
A lush exhibit reveals much about western views of women and the Third World. One of the blessings of postmodernism is that it has given new respectability to art which once had been consigned to the dustbin of history. Among the happiest beneficiaries of such revisionism are the 100 or so works that make up the exhibition "Noble Dreams, Wicked Pleasures: Orientalism in America 1870-1930," the big fall show that opens today at the Walters Art Gallery. It's easy on the eye, not too taxing intellectually and sexy as all get-out.
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