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By EILEEN SOSKIN and EILEEN SOSKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 14, 2005
Bach and Beethoven; Beethoven and Bach. The Columbia Orchestra, conducted by Jason Love, is starting the concert season tomorrow night at the Jim Rouse Theatre with a beautiful program beneficial to all listeners. Beethoven's Symphony No. 5 is probably the signature piece for classical music. Its opening motive (ta-ta-ta-tum) is probably familiar to most people older than age 5. Its power and sweep define romantic music (this piece is most evocative of the picture of Beethoven with wild, unruly hair)
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Theater Critic | March 21, 2008
Like all of the great romantic comedies, Stephen Sondheim's A Little Night Music is unsparing in its depiction of human folly. In an enchanting production running at Center Stage, the characters pay a price for their blind self-indulgence, their benighted yearnings, their frantic pursuits of will o' the wisps -- but the cost never is as high as they -- or we -- deserve. A beneficent fate rescues us from our worst enemy, who always turns out to be ourselves. If you go A Little Night Music runs at Center Stage, 700 N. Calvert St., through April 13. Showtimes are 8 p.m. Tuesdays-Fridays; 2 p.m., 8 p.m. Saturdays; and 2 p.m., 7:30 p.m. Sundays.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 30, 1998
Franz Liszt's "Totentanz," an extravagant set of variations on the "Dies Irae," warning of the Day of Judgment, requires a piano to shiver, shriek and moan as if it were a soul in torment.Rare are the pianists who program this unusual piece; rarer still are those who do not wilt before the rush of its super-heated romanticism.Number Eduardus Halim -- who will perform the "Totentanz" (along with Liszt's more familiar E-flat Concerto) with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra tonight -- among the elect.
NEWS
By EILEEN SOSKIN and EILEEN SOSKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 14, 2005
Bach and Beethoven; Beethoven and Bach. The Columbia Orchestra, conducted by Jason Love, is starting the concert season tomorrow night at the Jim Rouse Theatre with a beautiful program beneficial to all listeners. Beethoven's Symphony No. 5 is probably the signature piece for classical music. Its opening motive (ta-ta-ta-tum) is probably familiar to most people older than age 5. Its power and sweep define romantic music (this piece is most evocative of the picture of Beethoven with wild, unruly hair)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 11, 2005
The ballyhoo behind the abysmal film of Andrew Lloyd Webber's The Phantom of the Opera has blown some good news movie-lovers' way. Spurred by the excitement surrounding that picture before anybody had seen it, the Alloy Orchestra, sorcerers of percussive music made with unconventional instruments, devoted the winter to preparing a new score for the peerlessly creepy 1925 Lon Chaney version. "We knew that the `new'Phantom was coming out, and we were assuming it was going to be a big hit," says Alloy co-founder Ken Winokur, on the phone from Cambridge, Mass.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 18, 1996
Mario Venzago has just learned something conductors usually hate to hear.Venzago's piano soloist in his concerts with the Baltimore Symphony this week is reputed to take rhythmic liberties in performances of Romantic music -- such as the Chopin Concerto No. 2 on this week's program.Such a soloist can make life difficult for a conductor because flexible tempos are hard to follow. BSO music director David Zinman once described an encounter with such an errant pianist in the same Chopin concerto this way: "You watch your life pass in front of your eyes."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 9, 2003
The impulse to recapture the past is a strong one. It drives such things as re-creations of Civil War battles, which give participants a sense of how the real thing must have looked, felt, sounded. And it explains a musical phenomenon known, for better or worse, as the "authenticity movement" -- an attempt to replicate the way music of earlier times was first played. Like those modern-day Yankees and Rebels, the followers of this movement dig deep into the subject and re-learn how to do many things in order to make the time travel valid.
FEATURES
By James Roos and James Roos,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 20, 1994
"I have composed absolutely nothing this winter. What does it matter anyway? Nobody takes any notice."Fanny Mendelssohn wrote that in 1837, and today, 147 years after her death, most of her 400 musical works remain unpublished. Even her famous brother Felix Mendelssohn insisted that his sister publish the few compositions she managed to get printed under his name.Why? Because Fanny was a woman.She was not alone in her despair. Throughout history, the musical talent of hundreds of women has gone unfulfilled.
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 12, 1995
Music and romance have always been an item.Though no one knows what the first song ever written was, odds are it had something to do with love. Most songs do, after all. It is probably the most enduring theme in music, cropping up in everything from the Song of Solomon to troubadour ballads to Viennese opera to today's Top 40. In 1600, Shakespeare wrote, "If music be the food of love, play on" -- and play on we have, generating literally millions of love...
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Theater Critic | March 21, 2008
Like all of the great romantic comedies, Stephen Sondheim's A Little Night Music is unsparing in its depiction of human folly. In an enchanting production running at Center Stage, the characters pay a price for their blind self-indulgence, their benighted yearnings, their frantic pursuits of will o' the wisps -- but the cost never is as high as they -- or we -- deserve. A beneficent fate rescues us from our worst enemy, who always turns out to be ourselves. If you go A Little Night Music runs at Center Stage, 700 N. Calvert St., through April 13. Showtimes are 8 p.m. Tuesdays-Fridays; 2 p.m., 8 p.m. Saturdays; and 2 p.m., 7:30 p.m. Sundays.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 11, 2005
The ballyhoo behind the abysmal film of Andrew Lloyd Webber's The Phantom of the Opera has blown some good news movie-lovers' way. Spurred by the excitement surrounding that picture before anybody had seen it, the Alloy Orchestra, sorcerers of percussive music made with unconventional instruments, devoted the winter to preparing a new score for the peerlessly creepy 1925 Lon Chaney version. "We knew that the `new'Phantom was coming out, and we were assuming it was going to be a big hit," says Alloy co-founder Ken Winokur, on the phone from Cambridge, Mass.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 9, 2003
The impulse to recapture the past is a strong one. It drives such things as re-creations of Civil War battles, which give participants a sense of how the real thing must have looked, felt, sounded. And it explains a musical phenomenon known, for better or worse, as the "authenticity movement" -- an attempt to replicate the way music of earlier times was first played. Like those modern-day Yankees and Rebels, the followers of this movement dig deep into the subject and re-learn how to do many things in order to make the time travel valid.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 30, 1998
Franz Liszt's "Totentanz," an extravagant set of variations on the "Dies Irae," warning of the Day of Judgment, requires a piano to shiver, shriek and moan as if it were a soul in torment.Rare are the pianists who program this unusual piece; rarer still are those who do not wilt before the rush of its super-heated romanticism.Number Eduardus Halim -- who will perform the "Totentanz" (along with Liszt's more familiar E-flat Concerto) with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra tonight -- among the elect.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 18, 1996
Mario Venzago has just learned something conductors usually hate to hear.Venzago's piano soloist in his concerts with the Baltimore Symphony this week is reputed to take rhythmic liberties in performances of Romantic music -- such as the Chopin Concerto No. 2 on this week's program.Such a soloist can make life difficult for a conductor because flexible tempos are hard to follow. BSO music director David Zinman once described an encounter with such an errant pianist in the same Chopin concerto this way: "You watch your life pass in front of your eyes."
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 12, 1995
Music and romance have always been an item.Though no one knows what the first song ever written was, odds are it had something to do with love. Most songs do, after all. It is probably the most enduring theme in music, cropping up in everything from the Song of Solomon to troubadour ballads to Viennese opera to today's Top 40. In 1600, Shakespeare wrote, "If music be the food of love, play on" -- and play on we have, generating literally millions of love...
FEATURES
By James Roos and James Roos,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 20, 1994
"I have composed absolutely nothing this winter. What does it matter anyway? Nobody takes any notice."Fanny Mendelssohn wrote that in 1837, and today, 147 years after her death, most of her 400 musical works remain unpublished. Even her famous brother Felix Mendelssohn insisted that his sister publish the few compositions she managed to get printed under his name.Why? Because Fanny was a woman.She was not alone in her despair. Throughout history, the musical talent of hundreds of women has gone unfulfilled.
NEWS
June 14, 1995
Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli, 75, an acclaimed pianist known for demanding perfect conditions for his performances, died Monday in Lugano, Switzerland. He had requested that the cause of his death remain secret. He made a practice of taking his own piano -- or at least his personal piano tuner -- to concerts and of backing out at the slightest problem. He was best known for his interpretation of Romantic music.Francis, 90, a New York lawyer-industrialist who specialized in the creation of corporate conglomerates, died Thursday at Mount Sinai Hospital.
NEWS
September 19, 1991
Olga Spessivtzeva, a Russian ballerina acclaimed as one of the finest interpreters of "Giselle," died Monday of pneumonia in Valley Cottage, N.Y. She was 96. Miss Spessivtzeva danced with the Maryinsky Ballet, now known as the Kirov, and with Sergei Diaghilev's Ballet Russes. She gave her last performance in 1937.Zino Francescatti, a violinist who was one of France's most celebrated classical musicians, died Tuesday at his home in France. Mr. Francescatti, who was 89, made his debut at the Paris Opera in 1925 and quickly became a featured soloist in European capitals.
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