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By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | October 7, 1990
A colleague used to write a column called "Meals in 60 Minutes," but the photographer who took photos to accompany it always referred to the column as Meals in a Minute.After a few years she decided that 60 minutes was too much time to ask readers to devote to dinner, so now she writes "Meals in Minutes," a compromise between their philosophies.If speed-cooking pushes the limits any further, cooks will need radar detectors in the kitchen. But if the choice is fast meals or fast food, I'm certainly willing to offer a quick menu to keep people cooking.
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NEWS
April 2, 2006
This lasagna, slightly adapted from Joann Simonetti's recipe, uses homemade noodles, which results in a lighter dish, but dried noodles will work fine. JOANN SIMONETTI'S LASAGNA Makes 12 servings SAUCE: 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 tablespoon unsalted butter 1 / 2 sweet onion, chopped 2 pounds ground chuck 1 / 2 teaspoon each: salt, garlic powder Freshly ground pepper 1 can (29 ounces) tomato puree 2 cans (28 ounces each) crushed tomatoes 1 tablespoon dried basil 10 sprigs fresh basil or to taste 1 teaspoon sugar 2 teaspoons grated Romano cheese RICOTTA FILLING: 1 container (32 ounces)
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NEWS
July 1, 2001
Pesto is a wonderful paste of basil, cheese, nuts, garlic and olive oil that can be used in a number of dishes. A few tablespoons add flavor to soups and casseroles. Stir a teaspoon into mayonnaise for a sandwich. Mix a cup of it into hot pasta and add fresh chopped tomatoes and black olives for a light supper. Slathered on fresh bread and toasted, it's a delicious hors d'oeuvre. Pesto can easily be frozen in small batches for use all winter. For every two cups of fresh leaves (no stems)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 28, 2005
As of last night, Greenspring Station has a brand new restaurant. Kind of. What was City Crab closed Monday, and opened with a new name and theme. In the interim, the space got a bit of a facelift. Walls were refinished in dark burgundies and rich colors, white cloths adorn the tables, and a back conference room has become a wine room for private parties. Voila! Welcome to Mick & Tony's Baltimore Prime. Chef John Peragine (formerly of D.C.'s Capital Grille) describes the restaurant as a "New York-style steakhouse with a bit of an Italian flair."
FEATURES
By Maria Hiaasen | April 29, 1998
* Item: Knorr Italian Rices Risotto Milanese* What you get: 2 servings* Cost: About $2* Preparation time: About 25 minutes on stove top* Review: An accomplished cook turned me on to these arborio rice mixes, which are widely available in area supermarkets. No, you can't zap this Northern Italian delight in the microwave, but then you don't have to stir it constantly on your stove top either. Knorr earns kudos for the delicate blend of saffron, Romano cheese and white wine in the Milanese mix. (At a buck a serving, it had better be good.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Staff Writer | March 17, 1993
This Italian soup is traditionally spelled pasta e fagioli and commonly spelled pasta vasule.For those who have grown up enjoying this soup, pronouncing it is another matter. Syllables in vasule and fagioli elongate into a mellifluous "pasta e fajoooooolie" or "pasta vazooooooll."Pat Hufnagel of Ellicott City requested the soup.Responses came from many people, including Annie Ormsby of Millington and from Caroline Pacunas-Flick of Baltimore.Mrs. Flick wrote, "I am of Italian descent and have eaten a lot of pasta vasule, some with meat, some without.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | July 22, 1998
A spinach dip like that served at Houston's restaurants in Georgetown and Rockville was the request of Debra Barnes of Glen Burnie. "We have found and tried similar spinach dips but they just don't taste the same," she wrote.Tester Laura Reiley chose a recipe from Elaine Gershberg of Reisterstown."Hope this helps," Gershberg wrote. "I got it from the Internet. This is a knockoff of a popular appetizer served at Houston's, which has branches in Dallas and Chicago. Because Houston's does not give out recipes, this one for the creamy, rich dip made with spinach, artichokes and Romano cheese was developed in the Chicago Tribune kitchens.
FEATURES
By Charlotte Balcomb Lane and Charlotte Balcomb Lane,Orlando Sentinel | October 9, 1991
The growing popularity of Northern Italian cookery has changed the way Americans think of Italian food. Gone are the days when heavy, fat- and cheese-laden dishes like lasagna and baked ziti were the only Italian dishes Americans were familiar with.The ingredients in the following recipes are a blend of typical Northern Italian flavors.Pork Florentine8 slices boneless pork chops, sliced 1/8 -inch thick and trimmed of all visible fat (about 3/4 pound)10 ounces chopped, frozen spinach leaves, thawed and drained2 green onions, chopped2 tablespoons fresh parsley or basil, chopped1/2 teaspoon salt1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper1/8 teaspoon nutmeg, preferably freshly grated1 tablespoon Dijon-style mustard1 clove garlic, crushed2 ounces part-skim mozzarella cheese, grated (about 1/2 cup, loosely packed)
NEWS
April 2, 2006
This lasagna, slightly adapted from Joann Simonetti's recipe, uses homemade noodles, which results in a lighter dish, but dried noodles will work fine. JOANN SIMONETTI'S LASAGNA Makes 12 servings SAUCE: 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 tablespoon unsalted butter 1 / 2 sweet onion, chopped 2 pounds ground chuck 1 / 2 teaspoon each: salt, garlic powder Freshly ground pepper 1 can (29 ounces) tomato puree 2 cans (28 ounces each) crushed tomatoes 1 tablespoon dried basil 10 sprigs fresh basil or to taste 1 teaspoon sugar 2 teaspoons grated Romano cheese RICOTTA FILLING: 1 container (32 ounces)
FEATURES
By Jimmy Schmidt and Jimmy Schmidt,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | February 20, 1991
Pasta is a favorite for many reasons.L It is a wonderful dish to enjoy by yourself or with a crowd.It comes in a variety of sizes, shapes and flavors, so preparation possibilities are limited only by your imagination.It's a carbohydrate, so it can fuel your body for activities ranging from athletics to snow removal (so plan on pasta for a good dinner when winter storm warnings are flashing across your TV screen.)It's easy to cook and these tips will make it perfect:* In a large heavy saucepan or pot, bring to a violent boil one gallon of water for every pound of pasta.
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 16, 2005
Baby, it's cold outside, very cold. And when you come inside, you want something warming, and you want it right away. This dish almost could be called "snow-shovel soup" in honor of its warming properties after that hated winter task, but it's not quite a soup, nor quite a pasta dish. The broth gets added near the end, and it's just enough to float the stars of the dish: the sausage, greens and other vegetables. All you need add is a good crusty bread. For dessert, a bit of a downscale guilty pleasure after the healthful- ness of the main dish: canned cling peaches in heavy syrup (light syrup only saves you about 20 calories, so who are we kidding?
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2003
Hauteur loiters in the American ear around anything French, but perhaps this book can clarify brasserie. However the term has been appropriated by eating establishments over the years, it literally means brewery or perhaps more loosely, brew pub. The simple joys of the table that these terms imply find eloquent expression in American Brasserie by Rick Tramonto and Gale Gand with Julia Moskin (Wiley Publishing Inc., 2002, $21.95), which perhaps not coincidentally is printed on rough-textured paper.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2002
Ann Popovich of Jeannette, Pa., requested a recipe for vegetable lasagna "with a cream sauce and no tomatoes." Bryon Predika of Baltimore responded with tester Laura Reiley's choice. Vegetable Lasagna Serves 18 6 cups thinly sliced onions (about 3 large) 1 stick butter 1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon flour 1 1/2 quarts milk 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg 1/8 teaspoon white pepper 1 teaspoon dry mustard 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 3 pounds ricotta cheese 2 eggs 2 to 3 large cloves garlic 1/3 cup chopped parsley 1/4 teaspoon oregano 1/4 teaspoon basil 1/8 teaspoon thyme 2/3 cup grated Romano cheese 1 pound lasagna noodles 1/2 pound asparagus tips, cut into bite-sized pieces 1/3 pound snow peas 1/2 pound mushrooms, sliced 1 pound grated sharp cheddar cheese 1 pound grated Swiss cheese 1 ounce pine nuts In a large skillet with a lid, saute the onions in butter until limp.
NEWS
July 1, 2001
Pesto is a wonderful paste of basil, cheese, nuts, garlic and olive oil that can be used in a number of dishes. A few tablespoons add flavor to soups and casseroles. Stir a teaspoon into mayonnaise for a sandwich. Mix a cup of it into hot pasta and add fresh chopped tomatoes and black olives for a light supper. Slathered on fresh bread and toasted, it's a delicious hors d'oeuvre. Pesto can easily be frozen in small batches for use all winter. For every two cups of fresh leaves (no stems)
FEATURES
By John Ash and John Ash,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | April 18, 2001
I know we're supposed to minimize consumption of high fat and cured meats, like bacon. However, I can't imagine not having an occasional taste of good bacon. I emphasize good because much of the bacon in our markets is mass-produced and lacks the depth of flavor that you get from small artisan smokehouses. Here is a recipe that celebrates good bacon. Bucatini With Bacon and Pecorino Cheese Bucatini is spaghetti-shaped pasta, but a little thicker and hollow in the center. You could certainly use regular spaghetti of good quality, too. All kinds of variations are possible here, including the addition of some finely chopped ripe tomatoes, thinly sliced and sauteed onions or whatever you have on hand.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | July 22, 1998
A spinach dip like that served at Houston's restaurants in Georgetown and Rockville was the request of Debra Barnes of Glen Burnie. "We have found and tried similar spinach dips but they just don't taste the same," she wrote.Tester Laura Reiley chose a recipe from Elaine Gershberg of Reisterstown."Hope this helps," Gershberg wrote. "I got it from the Internet. This is a knockoff of a popular appetizer served at Houston's, which has branches in Dallas and Chicago. Because Houston's does not give out recipes, this one for the creamy, rich dip made with spinach, artichokes and Romano cheese was developed in the Chicago Tribune kitchens.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2002
Ann Popovich of Jeannette, Pa., requested a recipe for vegetable lasagna "with a cream sauce and no tomatoes." Bryon Predika of Baltimore responded with tester Laura Reiley's choice. Vegetable Lasagna Serves 18 6 cups thinly sliced onions (about 3 large) 1 stick butter 1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon flour 1 1/2 quarts milk 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg 1/8 teaspoon white pepper 1 teaspoon dry mustard 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 3 pounds ricotta cheese 2 eggs 2 to 3 large cloves garlic 1/3 cup chopped parsley 1/4 teaspoon oregano 1/4 teaspoon basil 1/8 teaspoon thyme 2/3 cup grated Romano cheese 1 pound lasagna noodles 1/2 pound asparagus tips, cut into bite-sized pieces 1/3 pound snow peas 1/2 pound mushrooms, sliced 1 pound grated sharp cheddar cheese 1 pound grated Swiss cheese 1 ounce pine nuts In a large skillet with a lid, saute the onions in butter until limp.
FEATURES
By John Ash and John Ash,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | April 18, 2001
I know we're supposed to minimize consumption of high fat and cured meats, like bacon. However, I can't imagine not having an occasional taste of good bacon. I emphasize good because much of the bacon in our markets is mass-produced and lacks the depth of flavor that you get from small artisan smokehouses. Here is a recipe that celebrates good bacon. Bucatini With Bacon and Pecorino Cheese Bucatini is spaghetti-shaped pasta, but a little thicker and hollow in the center. You could certainly use regular spaghetti of good quality, too. All kinds of variations are possible here, including the addition of some finely chopped ripe tomatoes, thinly sliced and sauteed onions or whatever you have on hand.
FEATURES
By Maria Hiaasen | April 29, 1998
* Item: Knorr Italian Rices Risotto Milanese* What you get: 2 servings* Cost: About $2* Preparation time: About 25 minutes on stove top* Review: An accomplished cook turned me on to these arborio rice mixes, which are widely available in area supermarkets. No, you can't zap this Northern Italian delight in the microwave, but then you don't have to stir it constantly on your stove top either. Knorr earns kudos for the delicate blend of saffron, Romano cheese and white wine in the Milanese mix. (At a buck a serving, it had better be good.
FEATURES
By PATSY JAMIESON and PATSY JAMIESON,EATING WELL United Feature Syndicate | October 8, 1995
Last fall Eating Well magazine solicited favorite old-style Italian-American recipes. The magazine received more letters than there are coins in the Trevi Fountain. We selected a quintessential version of the most popular dishes to revise and ,, transform into a more healthful version.Common to all of the classic recipes were generous amounts of ricotta, mozzarella, ground meat and sausage -- heavy doses of fat and saturated fat that called for lightening and alternative ways to enhance flavor.
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