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By Andrei Codrescu | July 30, 1996
I RETURNED TO my native country of Romania for the first time in six years. Six years ago I went there to cover a revolution and uncovered a lovely mess but reconnected myself to the land of my childhood.This time, there was no revolution going on. The streets of Bucharest were peaceful. Beautiful girls and women walked holding flowers. Outdoor cafes and restaurants were full of diners and music. In my hometown of Sibiu, in Transylvania, the strollers looked sophisticated and relaxed. The evidence of incipient capitalism was everywhere.
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NEWS
April 2, 2014
Regarding James Rosapepe's recent commentary ( "The Romanians were (partly) right ," March 28), I want to add some additional information. For Romania to criticize the Russian seizure of Crimea is like the pot calling the kettle black. Romania had its own expansionistic policy, they just have a convenient amnesia. In 1920, Romania received Transylvania, a part of Hungary for a 1,000 years, in the Treaty of Trianon. Not satisfied, the Romanian Army moved past the demarcation line into the truncated Hungary, trying unsuccessfully to gain further territory.
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NEWS
By ANDREI CODRESCU | March 25, 1996
NEW ORLEANS -- A couple of years ago, a Romanian guy who founded the Foot Tennis League called to enlist me in popularizing this new sport. Invented in Romania, it's just like tennis, only you don't use nets or rackets, just the ankle of your foot. And the ball is made out of tightly wrapped old shirts.With the advent of capitalism, many new sports are being invented in Romania. A guy in Cluj, Transylvania, invented a machine that enables him to smoke 300 cigarettes at the same time. Unlike America, smoking is not only tolerated in Eastern Europe but, thanks to the American tobacco companies' advertising, the natives are encouraged to smoke all the cigarettes Americans won't any more.
NEWS
By Jim Rosapepe | March 27, 2014
'I told you so.' That's what I'm sure most of my Romanian friends would tell me about Russia's heavy handed assault on Ukraine - if they weren't so polite. Almost from the day I arrived in Bucharest in February 1998 (when Boris Yeltsin, not Vladimir Putin, was President of Russia), Romanians tried to convince me that the U.S. was naive about Russia. There was - and is - plenty of evidence to support their view. I remember particularly a Saturday in June 1999 as the war in Kosovo was ending.
TRAVEL
By Raven Smith | October 26, 2008
Halloween is creeping closer, and it won't be long before little ghosts and goblins hit the streets in search of sweet treats. But for a more historical All Hallow's Eve this year, skip the candy trail and head straight to the home of Dracula himself: Romania. Despite being the birthplace of the spooky figure, Romania is one of Europe's most beautiful countries, with charming villages and rich Carpathian mountain scenery. Here are five things to do: 1 Explore Bran Castle : Don't let the name fool you: This is indeed Dracula's castle.
NEWS
By ELIE WIESEL | August 6, 1991
It is with a heavy and a troubled heart that I returned to Romania, my native land: An unhealthy ambience of uncertainty and anxiety reigns there that compels us to question the success and the sense of its revolution.When I went there last month with various Jewish representatives from the United States and Europe to participate in the commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the massacre of the Jews of Iasi (Jassy), I had the opportunity to see for myself: The system worked poorly.Nicolae Ceausescu has fallen, but an unknown number of his underlings, linked to his old secret service, still occupy positions of power.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Special to The Sun | July 18, 1994
BUCHAREST, Romania -- Warnings of a new AIDS crisis are echoing among volunteers fighting the disease, but Health Minister Iulian Minu -- once the personal physician of executed dictator Nicolae Ceausescu -- is ignoring them.Critics say the seeming indifference reflects a desperate attempt to avoid more of the worldwide publicity that accompanied the discovery of Romania's AIDS babies in 1990."A tragedy awaits us," predicted Marina Georgescu, one of the founders of ARAS (Romanian Association Against Aids)
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Special to The Sun | October 9, 1994
BUCHAREST, Romania -- It was a swift operation. Admirers of Nicolae Ceausescu placed a tombstone on his previously unmarked grave and attached the late Communist dictator's photograph to the Orthodox wooden cross."
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 14, 1991
WASHINGTON -- When the husband-and-wife team of Dr. James F. Bascom and Dr. Barbara Bascom arrived in Romania in the spring of last year, they found beautiful countryside and "a man-made disaster."The two Montgomery County physicians saw one of the more tragic effects of Nicolae Ceausescu's former regime in the filthy and neglected orphanages that peppered the picturesque landscape.Dr. James Bascom recalled seeing the tiny human forms -- deemed "unsalvageable" by the government -- left virtually unattended.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 3, 1997
PARIS -- France bowed yesterday to President Clinton's wish to limit NATO expansion to Poland, the Czech Republic and Hungary, backing away from a looming impasse when leaders of the alliance meet in Madrid, Spain, next week to extend the first invitations to formerly Communist countries in Central Europe.In a statement, the French government also said that while the United States had not yet ceded enough leadership positions in the alliance to Europeans to satisfy France's conditions for letting its troops rejoin the NATO military structures that it left 31 years ago, it was willing to continue discussions.
EXPLORE
June 22, 2011
Susan and Dragos Tudor , of Mount Airy, announce the birth of their son, Landon Gheorghe Tudor , on April 27, 2011, at 12:51 p.m. He weighed 9 pounds. His brother is Aiden. His grandparents are John and Joan Green, of Ellicott City; and Ion and Aurelia Tudor, of Bucharest, Romania.
NEWS
By Jim Rosapepe and Sheilah Kast | January 25, 2011
Tunisia, January 2011. Romania, December 1989. The similarities are eerie. Each country was governed for 21/2 decades by an autocrat. In both countries, the people, not the elite, launch the revolution. Soldiers allied with competing factions are shooting at each other. Common people are outraged to see the palaces of the dictator's family. French is the second language of the elite. Democrats around the world are cheering the revolution while security professionals in Western governments fret about stability.
TRAVEL
By Dave Rosenthal and Dave Rosenthal,dave.rosenthal@baltsun.com | December 13, 2009
"Dracula is Dead," a new travel literature book by Sheilah Kast and James C. Rosapepe, provides an updated look at post-Communist Romania. It draws on their experience in the Eastern European country: From 1998 to 2001, Rosapepe served as the U.S. ambassador to Romania (he now is a Maryland state senator); Kast is the host of "Maryland Morning" on WYPR (88.1 FM). We asked the husband-wife duo about their travels: Question: : What was your first memorable impression of Romania, and did it match what you had heard and read about the country?
TRAVEL
December 6, 2009
Which landlocked country is surrounded by Romania and Ukraine? Answer on Page 5:
FEATURES
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | November 10, 2009
Ask the average American about Romania, and the response would probably involve orphans, Olympic gymnasts or Dracula. Dispelling these common yet one-dimensional views of the country was, in large part, the inspiration for "Dracula is Dead," a new travel literature book by Sheilah Kast and James C. Rosapepe. The book, which will be released Monday, is a thoroughly researched yet conversational tour through the often-overlooked Eastern European country. "We had the opportunity to live there for three years and travel all over the country," Rosapepe said.
NEWS
October 3, 2009
NICOLAE PLESITA, 80 Sheltered Carlos the Jackal Gen. Nicolae Plesita, a die-hard Communist and chief of the Securitate secret police who arranged shelter in Romania for terrorist Carlos the Jackal and was tried for the bombing of Radio Free Europe, died Monday in Bucharest in a Romanian Intelligence Service hospital, where he was being treated for illnesses including diabetes, the Agerpres and Mediafax news agencies reported, citing family members....
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 1, 1998
BUCHAREST, Romania -- Romania is planning a yard sale. Up for grabs are busts of Nicolae and Elena Ceausescu, the Communist dictator and his wife who ran the country for more than three decades; fine porcelain and cheap crockery; handbags and briefcases."
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg and John Eisenberg,Sun Staff Writer | June 27, 1994
PASADENA, Calif. -- Before the World Cup began, the U.S. team had one basic, modest goal it wanted to achieve.It wanted to advance out of its round-robin group into the second round of the tournament, becoming the first U.S. team to do so in 64 years.Barring an unlikely set of results in games in other groups, the team's goal will be achieved. Yet the players weren't celebrating yesterday after completing round-robin play with a 1-0 loss to Romania before 93,369 at the sunburned Rose Bowl, where the temperature on the field was 115 degrees.
TRAVEL
By Raven Smith | October 26, 2008
Halloween is creeping closer, and it won't be long before little ghosts and goblins hit the streets in search of sweet treats. But for a more historical All Hallow's Eve this year, skip the candy trail and head straight to the home of Dracula himself: Romania. Despite being the birthplace of the spooky figure, Romania is one of Europe's most beautiful countries, with charming villages and rich Carpathian mountain scenery. Here are five things to do: 1 Explore Bran Castle : Don't let the name fool you: This is indeed Dracula's castle.
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