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NEWS
April 8, 1992
Douglas Radcliff-Umstead, a Baltimore native who was professor of Romance languages and literatures at Kent State University, was killed March 22 in the crash of a USAir jet taking off from La Guardia Airport in New York.A memorial service for Dr. Radcliff-Umstead, who was 52, was held Monday on the campus in Kent, Ohio.He is survived by his mother, Lulu Umstead of Kent; two brothers, Ronald and Gilbert Umstead, both of Catonsville; and a sister, Marlene Hetzel of Baltimore.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2013
@Mededitor tweets about "a tiresome grammar tirade (w/bonus 'entropy of our language')" at MMO Champion .  We are favored there by the observations of zeropeorth, who, thanks to his (sounds like a "he") superb command of the majestic English tongue, can instantly spot minor spelling errors: "to, two, too. " Who can suss out vogue usages online: "ermahgerd. " And who can single-handedly fuse the principles of physics, medicine, and linguistics: "As this entropy of our language has started to appear as an epidemic ... I'm fretting for our future ability to communicate.
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NEWS
October 30, 2005
Lionel Landry, an author, language scholar and retired State Department employee, died of bladder cancer Wednesday at his Chestertown home. He was 86. Mr. Landry, a Rhode Island native, contracted polio when he was 3 and used a cane all his life, his family said. He developed a love for classical music and languages. He graduated from Providence College in 1940 and earned a master's degree from Harvard University in Romance languages a year later. Mr. Landry, who was fluent in Spanish and French, taught English at the Centro Colombo-Americano for the U.S. State Department during World War II. He then became an assistant professor of Romance languages at Georgetown University.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | April 1, 2008
Dr. Daniel Thomas Skinner, who taught foreign languages at Morgan State University for more than three decades and was an avid book collector, died of respiratory failure March 22 at his home in Emerald Estate, a Northwest Baltimore retirement community. He was 91. Dr. Skinner was born in Boston and raised in the city's Roxbury neighborhood. He was a 1934 graduate of Boston English High School and graduated magna cum laude in 1938 from Harvard College with a bachelor's degree in Romance languages.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | April 1, 2008
Dr. Daniel Thomas Skinner, who taught foreign languages at Morgan State University for more than three decades and was an avid book collector, died of respiratory failure March 22 at his home in Emerald Estate, a Northwest Baltimore retirement community. He was 91. Dr. Skinner was born in Boston and raised in the city's Roxbury neighborhood. He was a 1934 graduate of Boston English High School and graduated magna cum laude in 1938 from Harvard College with a bachelor's degree in Romance languages.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2013
@Mededitor tweets about "a tiresome grammar tirade (w/bonus 'entropy of our language')" at MMO Champion .  We are favored there by the observations of zeropeorth, who, thanks to his (sounds like a "he") superb command of the majestic English tongue, can instantly spot minor spelling errors: "to, two, too. " Who can suss out vogue usages online: "ermahgerd. " And who can single-handedly fuse the principles of physics, medicine, and linguistics: "As this entropy of our language has started to appear as an epidemic ... I'm fretting for our future ability to communicate.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 19, 2003
ELKO, Nev. - They improvise on topics from politics to love, making their points in rhythmic, rhyming stanzas. Get them together on a stage and they're likely to try to one-up each other with good-natured insults that grow more outrageous with each verse. Basque poets may be the original rappers. Basque poetry is an ancient art, with antecedents that date to the 15th century, but it is as current as the news. Now, a group of Basque-American poets who have kept this native art alive in their adopted country have been selected for an award from the National Endowment for the Arts for their work, though the official ceremony scheduled for yesterday in Washington was postponed because of Hurricane Isabel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert K. Elder and Robert K. Elder,Chicago Tribune | February 13, 2005
Babbette Hines has spent the last three years rescuing love letters from thrift shops, estate sales and antiques stores. Recently, she chose from among hundreds of them from over the last two centuries to reprint in Love Letters Lost ($19.95, Princeton Architectural Press). Here she talks about how the form has changed and, reluctantly, about her own love letters. What do all love letters have in common, for better or worse? There's an immediate intimacy and honesty to them that really doesn't change.
NEWS
March 27, 2008
On March 22, 2008, DR. DANIEL T. SKINNER, retired Professor of Romance Languages, Morgan State College; beloved husband of the late Vyna Skinner; also survived by two sons, David and John Skinner, two sisters, four grandchildren, other loving relatives and friends. Viewing at THE JOSEPH L. RUSS FUNERAL HOME, P.A., 2222-26 W. North Avenue, on Friday from 3 to 8 P.M., with the family greeting friends from 6 to 8 P.M. Wake on Saturday at the New All Saints Catholic Church, 4408 Liberty Heights Avenue, from 10 to 11 A.M. when funeral mass will begin.
NEWS
July 23, 2002
Evelyn Sharp McLanahan, a former teacher and homemaker who had been active on several boards, died of pneumonia Thursday at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. She was 97. A resident of Broadmead since 1979, Mrs. McLanahan formerly lived in Guilford for many years. Born in Baltimore and raised in Walbrook, she was the daughter of the Rev. Henry Talbot Sharp, a Confederate Army Civil War veteran and rector of the old Prince of Peace Episcopal Church in Walbrook. She was a 1922 graduate of Bryn Mawr School and earned a bachelor's degree in Romance languages from Goucher College in 1926.
NEWS
October 30, 2005
Lionel Landry, an author, language scholar and retired State Department employee, died of bladder cancer Wednesday at his Chestertown home. He was 86. Mr. Landry, a Rhode Island native, contracted polio when he was 3 and used a cane all his life, his family said. He developed a love for classical music and languages. He graduated from Providence College in 1940 and earned a master's degree from Harvard University in Romance languages a year later. Mr. Landry, who was fluent in Spanish and French, taught English at the Centro Colombo-Americano for the U.S. State Department during World War II. He then became an assistant professor of Romance languages at Georgetown University.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert K. Elder and Robert K. Elder,Chicago Tribune | February 13, 2005
Babbette Hines has spent the last three years rescuing love letters from thrift shops, estate sales and antiques stores. Recently, she chose from among hundreds of them from over the last two centuries to reprint in Love Letters Lost ($19.95, Princeton Architectural Press). Here she talks about how the form has changed and, reluctantly, about her own love letters. What do all love letters have in common, for better or worse? There's an immediate intimacy and honesty to them that really doesn't change.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 19, 2003
ELKO, Nev. - They improvise on topics from politics to love, making their points in rhythmic, rhyming stanzas. Get them together on a stage and they're likely to try to one-up each other with good-natured insults that grow more outrageous with each verse. Basque poets may be the original rappers. Basque poetry is an ancient art, with antecedents that date to the 15th century, but it is as current as the news. Now, a group of Basque-American poets who have kept this native art alive in their adopted country have been selected for an award from the National Endowment for the Arts for their work, though the official ceremony scheduled for yesterday in Washington was postponed because of Hurricane Isabel.
NEWS
April 8, 1992
Douglas Radcliff-Umstead, a Baltimore native who was professor of Romance languages and literatures at Kent State University, was killed March 22 in the crash of a USAir jet taking off from La Guardia Airport in New York.A memorial service for Dr. Radcliff-Umstead, who was 52, was held Monday on the campus in Kent, Ohio.He is survived by his mother, Lulu Umstead of Kent; two brothers, Ronald and Gilbert Umstead, both of Catonsville; and a sister, Marlene Hetzel of Baltimore.
BUSINESS
September 5, 2004
Punch up: www.babelfish.alta vista.com Why it clicks: It's a global economy out there. But taking advantage of international opportunities can be tough if your foreign-language skills have been in cold storage since high school. The download: Babel Fish quickly translates 12 languages into English (and vice versa) and has a feature to translate entire Web pages. Traditional Romance languages are covered, as are Chinese, Japanese, Dutch, German and Russian. Want to decipher the home page of a Korean company?
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