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By Michael Sragow | michael.sragow@baltsun.com and Sun Movie Critic | March 5, 2010
I f you want to fall hard for a movie, and a movie star, this weekend, check out the ravishing new print of Elia Kazan's romance-cum-social drama, "Wild River" (1960), set in Depression-era Tennessee. Lee Remick had an undercelebrated run in gnarly pictures, from her debut as a drop-dead-gorgeous majorette in Kazan's "A Face in the Crowd" (1957) to her weathered turn as an ex-con's wife in Robert Mulligan's "Baby the Rain Must Fall" (1965). She's an unself-conscious dazzler in "Wild River," which she called her favorite movie.
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By Samantha Iacia and For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Date: July 3 Her story: Pamela Woolford, 47, grew up in Columbia. She is a fiction writer and a former community correspondent for The Baltimore Sun. Her mother, the Rev. Sadie Woolford, lives in Columbia. Her father, Llewellyn Woolford Sr., died in 2012. His story: Gregory Martin, 41, grew up in Middlesex, N.J. He is a music and philosophy teacher at Capital City Public Charter School in Washington, and is also a freelance composer and sound designer. His parents, Mary Ann and Thomas Martin, live in Middlesex.
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FEATURES
January 18, 2006
If you're looking for romance, Paris is definitely a winner. Just ask the guy from The Bachelor. But what if you're trying to find a romantic spot here in Maryland? Would you go to St. Michaels? Cumberland? We want you to tell us the best place to go for a romantic getaway in Maryland. Please e-mail your responses to travel@baltsun.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
All it takes is a little swine emergency for Mary to claim herself a third suitor.  It's about a year after Matthew's death, and, yeah, it's a bit jarring to see Mary pursued by three men so soon. But it's also a bit fun. Well, Lord Gillingham is fun. Evelyn Napier's a bit blah. He's nice enough, but in a total friend-zone sort of way.  Now enter Charles Blake, who, in the course of this episode, goes from considering Mary "aloof" (super-mean, early-20th-century wise) to crushing on her.  The pigs have arrived!
NEWS
By Russell Baker | March 13, 1991
CELEBRATING another wedding anniversary the other day so soon after the death of Arthur Murray, I decided to irritate our children. They are now adult enough to endure a little irritation, and afterward when I've gone off to bed it probably enhances their sense of maturity to sit around the kitchen table complaining that they have a lot to put up with.Romance was on my mind for obvious reasons: wedding anniversary, Arthur Murray, dancing cheek-to-cheek, etc. Also the Washington Post had run a good feature that morning about Murray, ballroom dancing and popular songs of long ago which tirelessly flogged the idea of "romance."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2013
Sure, not everyone wants to celebrate Valentine's Day. It's not so hard to sit it out. But imagine if you and your sweetheart worked together in the Valentine's Day industry, catering to romance but, come dinnertime on Feb. 14, never able to experience it yourselves. That's the situation facing couples who work together in restaurants. Picture them: One is firing up a filet mignons, the other is clambering over boxes of sparkling wine in the walk-in. All the while, customers are glowing dreamily in the candlelight, clasping hands under the table and feeding each other succulent bites of lobster Thermidor.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Sun Staff Writer | February 14, 1995
Avon J. Bellamy draws on the healing power of words and aims them like Cupid's arrows at the hearts of black women.With poetry, he tries to soothe the pain in relationships among blacks, ease tension between men and women and, most of all, revive romance. He says his poems are meant to tell black women something they're told too rarely -- that they're special."We've lost respect for ourselves and our women in a way that we wouldn't have allowed to happen when I was a teen-ager," says Mr. Bellamy, 53, a Baltimore native.
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | April 15, 1991
"QUICK," I SAY TO A COLLEAGUE, "what's the most romantic thing that ever happened to you?"Her answer comes back with the speed of an arrow shot from Cupid's bow."This may sound really ridiculous," she says, "but I think it was when a guy I was dating kissed me while I was brushing my teeth. He had been away on a trip and rushed over to my house when he returned. He barged into the bathroom, said he was so happy to see me and started kissing me -- even though I had a mouthful of Crest."Hmmmmmm.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | July 16, 1997
The two stars reportedly hated each other during the filming, but Richard Gere and Debra Winger sure made convincing romance on screen in "An Officer and a Gentleman" (8: 05 p.m.-10: 50 p.m., TBS).Director Taylor Hackford's 1982 film follows Gere as he maneuvers his way through Naval Officer Candidate School, despite two strikes against him: his attitude (he's quite the operator) and his drill instructor (Louis Gossett Jr.), who's hardly his biggest fan.Gere has never been better; he and Winger generate plenty of heat (some of which will be toned down for commercial TV)
NEWS
October 16, 2005
Slightly more than one-third of surveyed moviegoers reported seeing fewer films this year than in the previous year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel and Assistant editor, b | January 19, 2014
That "glamorous pirate" Lord Gillingham is working on some sort of Guinness World Record of pursuit here.  I'd be weirded out a bit if Tony wasn't more likeable. He's proper, but not insufferable. And doesn't get drunk easily like Sir John "Dimples" Bullock. And Mary is clearly a catch -- she has the looks, the property and side-saddle riding abilities. But compared with Matthew Crawley's epic 147-year courtship of Mary, Lord Gillingham's unexpected marriage proposal seems pretty jarring.
FEATURES
By Douglas Nivens II, For The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2013
Last month, I attended my fiancé's mother's wedding. Both she and her new husband knew each other for decades, each the surviving spouse of a prior marriage. Their wedding had the full works for a formal church ceremony: unity candles, live vocalists, flower girls and an off-white traditional wedding gown. Her two sons escorted her down the aisle, making a grand entrance in the sanctuary. She beamed when she pronounced her I do's, and the guests applauded at the union. Regardless of time, the newlyweds found love again.
EXPLORE
May 6, 2013
More than 200 cars and 1,700 spectators gathered in Jarrettsville on April 13 to celebrate Harford County's car culture at the 2nd Annual Romancing the Chrome Car Show hosted by Harford County Public Library and the Jarrettsville Lions Club. Car enthusiasts and onlookers alike enjoyed a beer garden, live music by The Diamond Heads and concessions by Pond View Farm and Pit Crew, WOLO gourmet food truck and catering and Jarrettsville Creamery and Deli. Attendees explored a variety of exhibits from vendors including the Jarrettsville Volunteer Fire Company, the Harford County Sheriff's Office, Harford County Public Library and several of the event's sponsors: Keene Dodge, Mr. Tire, Harford Sanitation/Waste Industries, WXCY, Race On LLC, Bill Schilling & Chad Shrodes/Long & Foster Realtors, Liberty Mutual, Atlantic Tractor, WAMD and the Jarrettsville Friends of Harford County Public Library.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
The story of Monte and Patrice Sanders just might be the classic fitness fairy tale. Girl hires trainer. Sparks fly over sit-ups. Trainer turns boyfriend, then fiance, then husband. Healthy, happily ever after. As Baltimore's newest power couple approach their first anniversary, they're closer than ever, indulging in candid displays of public affection, embarking on projects together, thinking about expanding their family and, after a fairly hushed courtship, talking about how a news anchor fell for a celebrity trainer.
EXPLORE
By L'Oreal Thompson | April 9, 2013
For romance writer Suzie Carr, inspiration comes from everyday life. Through her lesbian romance novels, she tackles topics such as adultery, temptation, bullying and coming of age. She says she hopes those themes resonate with her readers and bring awareness to social issues. “Through my books, I feel like I'm touching lives. There's a positive message behind it,” says Carr, who lives in Elkridge. “It's more than just a love story. This literature could be mainstream because it deals with real-life issues.” Carr's first novel, “The Fiche Room” -- which is currently being adapted into a short film -- was published in 2007 by LavenderDoor.com, a website that sells e-books.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2013
Sure, not everyone wants to celebrate Valentine's Day. It's not so hard to sit it out. But imagine if you and your sweetheart worked together in the Valentine's Day industry, catering to romance but, come dinnertime on Feb. 14, never able to experience it yourselves. That's the situation facing couples who work together in restaurants. Picture them: One is firing up a filet mignons, the other is clambering over boxes of sparkling wine in the walk-in. All the while, customers are glowing dreamily in the candlelight, clasping hands under the table and feeding each other succulent bites of lobster Thermidor.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Sun Staff Writer | February 14, 1995
Romance novels have taken on a different shade, and tonight Baltimoreans can meet some of the publishers and writers of uniquely African-American heart-stoppers."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2013
Baltimore has witnessed love and loss. From the banks of the harbor to Mount Vernon's cobblestones to the grassed-over burial plots of Greenmount Cemetery, embedded in this city are vestiges of some of history's great romances, stories of people coming together and people coming undone. Pamela Regis, a professor of English at McDaniel College and as director of the Nora Roberts Center for American Romance, something of a scholar of the heart, sees romance in the possibility suggested by the harbor, in people coming together and separating at Penn Station, in the centuries old neighborhoods where generations courted, married and grew families.
FEATURES
By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2013
Ever stay at a wonderful hotel and dream of replicating that style at home? Travelers often covet the fluffy bedding, chic furnishings, deep soaking tubs and fancy showerheads that are standard these days at many hotels. With Valentine's Day fast approaching, there's no better time to evoke a cozy, romantic bed-and-breakfast or a luxe hotel feel right within your own abode. "The home is a sacred place. You share it with those that you care about and love the most," says Amanda Austin, owner of the eponymous Baltimore interior design firm.
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