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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2000
A lot of fascinating stuff must have happened in gates one through eight, because there sure isn't much left to tell in nine. "The Ninth Gate" is a film that really has no idea what it wants to be, so it tries a little of everything, and does nothing very well. It's a horror movie about the devil where the only horrifying thing is realizing how much time you've invested. It's a black comedy where none of the actors seem in on the joke. It's a film about the world of rare books where a supposed "expert" treats a priceless 17th-century volume with the sort of care usually reserved for that second-hand Stephen King paperback you picked up from Goodwill.
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NEWS
December 22, 2009
A California appeals court on Monday rejected Roman Polanski's bid to have his 32-year-old sex case dismissed, but cited grave concerns over possible judicial and prosecutorial misconduct. "We encourage all participating parties to do their utmost to ensure that this matter now draws to a close in a manner that fully addresses the issues of due process and fundamental fairness raised by the events of long ago," the court's opinion stated. While a blow to Polanski's efforts to have the case dismissed and win his freedom from Swiss authorities, the ruling cast serious doubt on how the case was handled.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff | March 5, 2000
Yes, Roman Polanski's new film returns him to some of the satanic themes he so masterfully handled in "Rosemary's Baby" 32 years ago. But before you start thinking, "There he goes again," think for a minute. His satanic reputation notwithstanding, "The Ninth Gate," which opens in theaters Friday, is only the second Polanski film with the devil as its central -- though offscreen -- character. It's amazing what one astonishingly successful film early in your career can do. Especially when that film, about a submissive New York housewife who is secretly impregnated by Lucifer himself, is still giving audiences the willies.
FEATURES
September 23, 2005
NOSFERATU -- F.W. Murnau's masterpiece of silent-film horror, 1922's Nosferatu, A Symphony of Horror, with Max Schreck as the vampire against which all future bloodsuckers would be measured (and most would come up short), will be shown Thursday at the Senator Theatre, 5904 York Road, in a screening sponsored by the Senator and the Creative Alliance. A live score will be performed by Devil Music Ensemble, a Boston rock band. Showtime is 8 p.m., and tickets are $10. Information: 410-435-8338.
NEWS
December 22, 2009
A California appeals court on Monday rejected Roman Polanski's bid to have his 32-year-old sex case dismissed, but cited grave concerns over possible judicial and prosecutorial misconduct. "We encourage all participating parties to do their utmost to ensure that this matter now draws to a close in a manner that fully addresses the issues of due process and fundamental fairness raised by the events of long ago," the court's opinion stated. While a blow to Polanski's efforts to have the case dismissed and win his freedom from Swiss authorities, the ruling cast serious doubt on how the case was handled.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2003
* BEST PICTURE Academy Pick: Chicago, because it thrillingly revitalizes the movie musical, and because Los Angeles knows, even better than Chicago does, how to turn notoriety into show-biz clout. Sragow Pick: The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (above), for preserving the life of larger-than-life spectacles while conjuring awe-inspiring images -- and putting them at the service of an epic story that sees the good and evil within us all. * BEST DIRECTOR Academy Pick: Rob Marshall, because in Chicago he brings contemporary cutting and pizazz to singing, dancing and banter while showcasing his rich human material, the tip-top performers, instead of reducing them to hideous puppets a la last year's Moulin Rouge.
FEATURES
September 23, 2005
NOSFERATU -- F.W. Murnau's masterpiece of silent-film horror, 1922's Nosferatu, A Symphony of Horror, with Max Schreck as the vampire against which all future bloodsuckers would be measured (and most would come up short), will be shown Thursday at the Senator Theatre, 5904 York Road, in a screening sponsored by the Senator and the Creative Alliance. A live score will be performed by Devil Music Ensemble, a Boston rock band. Showtime is 8 p.m., and tickets are $10. Information: 410-435-8338.
FEATURES
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 7, 2003
NEW YORK - Roman Polanski's The Pianist, an emotionally devastating portrait of Polish life during the Holocaust, was the big winner at the 37th annual award vote meeting of The National Society of Film Critics, taking four major prizes: best director, actor, screenplay and film. Polanski's movie was based on the true-life memoirs of Wladyslaw Szpilman, a young classical pianist who lived through the hellish World War II Nazi occupation in Warsaw. It has been hailed as a definitive comeback for the controversial director, who, as a youngster, experienced the Polish holocaust years himself in Krakow, the site of Schindler's List.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 11, 2003
NEW YORK - "Maintaining his dignity through this entire maddening experience": That's how actor Adrien Brody sums up musician-composer Wladyslaw Szpilman's struggle to survive the Warsaw Ghetto, as recounted in his memoir The Pianist. It was also the challenge posed to Brody when he took the role of Szpilman in Roman Polanski's movie - a project all the more charged because Polanski barely escaped the liquidation of the Krakow Ghetto and lost his mother in Auschwitz. For the 29-year-old actor who was supposed to emerge as a star from Terrence Malick's 1998 The Thin Red Line, only to be cut from most of the picture, The Pianist has become an unexpected career breakthrough, earning him several best actor prizes, most recently from the National Society of Film Critics (which named The Pianist best picture and also honored the direction and the script)
FEATURES
By Michael Wilmington and Michael Wilmington,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 14, 2003
Will bad blood between the French and American governments spill over into the world of movies, movie stars and plush beach parties on the Riviera? Not according to new Cannes Film Festival director Thierry Fremaux - but we'll soon know. This year's festival - the 56th edition in a line that goes back to 1946 and the end of World War II - opens today, with a gala screening of a Fanfan le Tulip, a comedy-adventure movie remade by director Gerard Krawczyk from the 1951 French Gerard Philipe classic.
FEATURES
By Michael Wilmington and Michael Wilmington,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 14, 2003
Will bad blood between the French and American governments spill over into the world of movies, movie stars and plush beach parties on the Riviera? Not according to new Cannes Film Festival director Thierry Fremaux - but we'll soon know. This year's festival - the 56th edition in a line that goes back to 1946 and the end of World War II - opens today, with a gala screening of a Fanfan le Tulip, a comedy-adventure movie remade by director Gerard Krawczyk from the 1951 French Gerard Philipe classic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2003
* BEST PICTURE Academy Pick: Chicago, because it thrillingly revitalizes the movie musical, and because Los Angeles knows, even better than Chicago does, how to turn notoriety into show-biz clout. Sragow Pick: The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (above), for preserving the life of larger-than-life spectacles while conjuring awe-inspiring images -- and putting them at the service of an epic story that sees the good and evil within us all. * BEST DIRECTOR Academy Pick: Rob Marshall, because in Chicago he brings contemporary cutting and pizazz to singing, dancing and banter while showcasing his rich human material, the tip-top performers, instead of reducing them to hideous puppets a la last year's Moulin Rouge.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 11, 2003
NEW YORK - "Maintaining his dignity through this entire maddening experience": That's how actor Adrien Brody sums up musician-composer Wladyslaw Szpilman's struggle to survive the Warsaw Ghetto, as recounted in his memoir The Pianist. It was also the challenge posed to Brody when he took the role of Szpilman in Roman Polanski's movie - a project all the more charged because Polanski barely escaped the liquidation of the Krakow Ghetto and lost his mother in Auschwitz. For the 29-year-old actor who was supposed to emerge as a star from Terrence Malick's 1998 The Thin Red Line, only to be cut from most of the picture, The Pianist has become an unexpected career breakthrough, earning him several best actor prizes, most recently from the National Society of Film Critics (which named The Pianist best picture and also honored the direction and the script)
FEATURES
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 7, 2003
NEW YORK - Roman Polanski's The Pianist, an emotionally devastating portrait of Polish life during the Holocaust, was the big winner at the 37th annual award vote meeting of The National Society of Film Critics, taking four major prizes: best director, actor, screenplay and film. Polanski's movie was based on the true-life memoirs of Wladyslaw Szpilman, a young classical pianist who lived through the hellish World War II Nazi occupation in Warsaw. It has been hailed as a definitive comeback for the controversial director, who, as a youngster, experienced the Polish holocaust years himself in Krakow, the site of Schindler's List.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2000
A lot of fascinating stuff must have happened in gates one through eight, because there sure isn't much left to tell in nine. "The Ninth Gate" is a film that really has no idea what it wants to be, so it tries a little of everything, and does nothing very well. It's a horror movie about the devil where the only horrifying thing is realizing how much time you've invested. It's a black comedy where none of the actors seem in on the joke. It's a film about the world of rare books where a supposed "expert" treats a priceless 17th-century volume with the sort of care usually reserved for that second-hand Stephen King paperback you picked up from Goodwill.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff | March 5, 2000
Yes, Roman Polanski's new film returns him to some of the satanic themes he so masterfully handled in "Rosemary's Baby" 32 years ago. But before you start thinking, "There he goes again," think for a minute. His satanic reputation notwithstanding, "The Ninth Gate," which opens in theaters Friday, is only the second Polanski film with the devil as its central -- though offscreen -- character. It's amazing what one astonishingly successful film early in your career can do. Especially when that film, about a submissive New York housewife who is secretly impregnated by Lucifer himself, is still giving audiences the willies.
NEWS
By Laura Mansnerus and Laura Mansnerus,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 1, 1996
Timothy Leary, who effectively introduced many Americans to the psychedelic 1960s with the relentlessly quoted phrase "tune in, turn on, drop out," died yesterday at his home in Beverly Hills, Calif. He was 75.HTC However indelible his connection with another era, Leary was very much a man of the moment, and he made his death a final act of performance art by having video cameras record it for possible broadcast on the Internet. He had planned a celebration, and Web sites had collected Leary memorabilia -- texts of his books and lectures, tributes from friends, a listing of his daily drug intake, legal and illegal -- from the time he was told last year that he had prostate cancer.
NEWS
By Dick Polman and Dick Polman,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 10, 1991
MARK TWAIN'S AQUARIUM:THE SAMUEL CLEMENSANGELFISH CORRESPONDENCE1905-1910.Edited by John Cooley.University of Georgia.326 pages. $24.95. Seventy-three years old, and his passion for the opposite sex had not been sated. "I want you!" he wrote to a companion in 1908. "Can you imagine a time when I don't want you? As far as my understanding of it goes, I want you all the time. I hope you will get entirely over your cold, dear heart & will come to me tomorrow week sound & well."Thus wrote Samuel Clemens, known to the world as Mark Twain, in a letter to Dorothy Quick, of whom the author had taken "possession" (his word)
NEWS
By Laura Mansnerus and Laura Mansnerus,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 1, 1996
Timothy Leary, who effectively introduced many Americans to the psychedelic 1960s with the relentlessly quoted phrase "tune in, turn on, drop out," died yesterday at his home in Beverly Hills, Calif. He was 75.HTC However indelible his connection with another era, Leary was very much a man of the moment, and he made his death a final act of performance art by having video cameras record it for possible broadcast on the Internet. He had planned a celebration, and Web sites had collected Leary memorabilia -- texts of his books and lectures, tributes from friends, a listing of his daily drug intake, legal and illegal -- from the time he was told last year that he had prostate cancer.
NEWS
By Dick Polman and Dick Polman,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 10, 1991
MARK TWAIN'S AQUARIUM:THE SAMUEL CLEMENSANGELFISH CORRESPONDENCE1905-1910.Edited by John Cooley.University of Georgia.326 pages. $24.95. Seventy-three years old, and his passion for the opposite sex had not been sated. "I want you!" he wrote to a companion in 1908. "Can you imagine a time when I don't want you? As far as my understanding of it goes, I want you all the time. I hope you will get entirely over your cold, dear heart & will come to me tomorrow week sound & well."Thus wrote Samuel Clemens, known to the world as Mark Twain, in a letter to Dorothy Quick, of whom the author had taken "possession" (his word)
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