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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1999
The glory that was Rome is clearly portrayed in the riveting "Rome: Power & Glory," a six-hour miniseries debuting Sunday on The Learning Channel.Modern minds may have trouble comprehending just how powerful and pervasive Rome was in its day. At its height, the Roman Empire stretched from Syria to Scotland and was guarded by a citizens' army -- later made professional -- that is still seen as a model of strength and efficiency.Rome itself counted 1 million inhabitants at its peak, around 100 A.D.; more than 17 centuries would pass before another urban area (London)
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By Mark J. Hannon | October 11, 2007
In Kenneth Clark's Civilization, he describes the early invaders of the Roman Empire as "there for what they could get out of it, taking part in the administration if it paid them, contemptuous of the traditional culture, except insofar as it provided precious metals." The next wave of invaders didn't "destroy the great buildings that were scattered all over the Roman world. But the idea of keeping them up never entered their heads. ... They preferred to live in pre-fabs and let the old places fall down.
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FEATURES
August 17, 2007
Last Legion, an action-adventure fantasy about the end of the Roman empire, was not screened for critics.
FEATURES
August 24, 2007
Aug. 24 410 Rome was overrun by the Visigoths, an event that symbolized the fall of the Roman Empire. 2006 The International Astronomical Union demoted Pluto to "dwarf planet" status.
FEATURES
August 24, 2007
Aug. 24 410 Rome was overrun by the Visigoths, an event that symbolized the fall of the Roman Empire. 2006 The International Astronomical Union demoted Pluto to "dwarf planet" status.
NEWS
By FRANK R. HAIG | September 4, 1996
WHEN DR. DAVID S. McKay of NASA gave his press conference last month concerning a possible indication of life on Mars, many of the articles in the popular press raised the question of the theological implications of the event.Would Christianity (or other religions but I cannot speak for them) have anything to say about intelligent life elsewhere in our universe, if that is where this announcement finally gets to?Strangely enough, the issue is not a new one. From the very beginning Christianity insisted that it recognized no sacred place.
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | September 6, 1991
Chicago -- When the Third Reich fell, the first American officials given access to its leaders came from the Strategic Bombing Survey. The hope was that this group of scholars could learn something about the effect of air raids that would be useful in the continuing war with Japan.But the economist John Kenneth Galbraith, serving on the staff of that study group, says that the defeated Nazis were of no use at all. Most were drunk or drugged, waking only to the symptoms of withdrawal, incoherent when not actually in the grip of delirium and the after-effects of alcoholic poisoning.
NEWS
January 15, 1994
* Samuel Bronston, 85, a film producer whose works included "El Cid," "55 Days at Peking" and "Fall of the Roman Empire," died Wednesday in Sacramento, Calif. In the 1960s, he produced "El Cid," starring Charlton Heston and Sophia Loren; "The Fall of the Roman Empire," with Ms. Loren; "55 Days at Peking," with Mr. Heston, David Niven and Ava Gardner; and "Circus World" with John Wayne and Rita Hayworth. Earlier films included "Jack London" in 1943, "And Then There Were None" and "Walk In the Sun," in 1945.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | February 10, 2002
The Devil's Details: A History of the Footnote, by Chuck Zerby (Invisible Cities Press, 150 pages, $24). Perhaps you wholeheartedly agree with Noel Coward's famous dictum that "Having to read a footnote resembles having to go downstairs to answer the door while in the midst of making love." If so, Chuck Zerby may not win you over to his unflinching enthusiasm for the footnote as both irreplaceably valuable and indelibly entertaining. The usage began some time in the mid 1500s, he relates in this charming, witty history and exploration of the formal written aside.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2001
A trio of girls skipped around a new mosaic sculpture they helped to make outside Govans Elementary School and wondered aloud if it would last longer than the ancient society best known for the art form. "Mr. Spoon said it's going to last forever," Moravia Lindsay, 9, said. With the help of Bryant "Spoon" Smith, an artist-in-residence sent to the North Baltimore public school by the Baltimore Museum of Art, Moravia and others had built a shiny stone artwork taller than they are, using the same technique as in Antioch.
FEATURES
August 17, 2007
Last Legion, an action-adventure fantasy about the end of the Roman empire, was not screened for critics.
SPORTS
By Randy Harvey and Randy Harvey,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2004
Truths and myths about the Ancient Olympic Games, which, according to historians' best estimates, began in 776 B.C. in Olympia as a tribute to Zeus and ended in A.D. 393 after the Roman Empire declared them a pagan ritual: 1. Athletes competed naked. True, although not in the first few Olympics. They wore loincloths. According to some, athletes completely disrobed after one runner's loincloth slipped to his ankles, causing him to trip. According to others, Orsippus of Megara started the non-fashion trend when he won a race nude.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff | March 14, 2004
God Against the Gods: The History of the War Between Monotheism and Polytheism, by Jonathan Kirsch. Viking. 352 pages. $25.95 Had pagans and their multitude of gods won the battle 1,600 years ago for the soul of the Roman Empire -- instead of Christians and monotheism -- would the world's religious landscape be a more peaceful one today? This is the intriguing question at the beginning of Jonathan Kirsch's God Against the Gods: The History of the War Between Monotheism and Polytheism. Kirsch argues that whatever paganism's excesses -- human sacrifice and orgies come to mind -- it was more tolerant than the monotheistic faiths that succeeded it: Judaism, Christianity and Islam.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | February 10, 2002
The Devil's Details: A History of the Footnote, by Chuck Zerby (Invisible Cities Press, 150 pages, $24). Perhaps you wholeheartedly agree with Noel Coward's famous dictum that "Having to read a footnote resembles having to go downstairs to answer the door while in the midst of making love." If so, Chuck Zerby may not win you over to his unflinching enthusiasm for the footnote as both irreplaceably valuable and indelibly entertaining. The usage began some time in the mid 1500s, he relates in this charming, witty history and exploration of the formal written aside.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2001
A trio of girls skipped around a new mosaic sculpture they helped to make outside Govans Elementary School and wondered aloud if it would last longer than the ancient society best known for the art form. "Mr. Spoon said it's going to last forever," Moravia Lindsay, 9, said. With the help of Bryant "Spoon" Smith, an artist-in-residence sent to the North Baltimore public school by the Baltimore Museum of Art, Moravia and others had built a shiny stone artwork taller than they are, using the same technique as in Antioch.
NEWS
By Laurie Udesky and Laurie Udesky,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 7, 2000
BIRECIK, Turkey - In the last vestiges of twilight, a team of archaeologists was urgently working to rescues clues about an ancient past. The reason for the archaeologists' haste was the new Birecik dam and the lake that was filling behind it and about to flood a 2,000-year-old city. This week, the archaeologists won their race. They finished sketching the ruins, removing mosaics and statues, and reburying areas about to be flooded. The dam is part of the ambitious $32 billion Southeast Anatolia Project, known as GAP, and will bring electricity and water to farmers in an area that was one of the staging grounds for the long, fading war between Kurds and the Turkish army.
FEATURES
By SUN STAFF | February 18, 2000
In the wake of this week's cheesy Fox Network special "Who Wants to Marry a Multi-Millionaire?" -- which racked up huge ratings as wannabe brides in wedding gowns vied to marry a total stranger with big bucks -- can the following game shows be far behind? "Who'll Eat a Ferret for $10 Million?" Sure, your standard 25-inch domestic ferret tastes awful -- and it packs a mean bite. But that's the whole point! Tune in as contestants -- armed only with condiments -- attempt to devour a live ferret in a hilarious bid for huge cash prizes!
NEWS
By Mark J. Hannon | October 11, 2007
In Kenneth Clark's Civilization, he describes the early invaders of the Roman Empire as "there for what they could get out of it, taking part in the administration if it paid them, contemptuous of the traditional culture, except insofar as it provided precious metals." The next wave of invaders didn't "destroy the great buildings that were scattered all over the Roman world. But the idea of keeping them up never entered their heads. ... They preferred to live in pre-fabs and let the old places fall down.
FEATURES
By SUN STAFF | February 18, 2000
In the wake of this week's cheesy Fox Network special "Who Wants to Marry a Multi-Millionaire?" -- which racked up huge ratings as wannabe brides in wedding gowns vied to marry a total stranger with big bucks -- can the following game shows be far behind? "Who'll Eat a Ferret for $10 Million?" Sure, your standard 25-inch domestic ferret tastes awful -- and it packs a mean bite. But that's the whole point! Tune in as contestants -- armed only with condiments -- attempt to devour a live ferret in a hilarious bid for huge cash prizes!
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun Staff | November 15, 1999
If Hollywood can do it, why not Silicon Valley?Taking a cue from the movie industry, computer game makers are looking to cash in with a raft of sequels this holiday season. Two of the first to hit your local CompUSA are Microsoft's "Age of Empires II: The Age of Kings" and Westwood Studios' "Command & Conquer: Tiberian Sun.""The Age of Kings" picks up where its best-selling 1997 predecessor left off -- at the fall of the Roman Empire -- and sweeps through the next 1,000 years of history. Released last month, the sequel has shot to the top of the software best seller charts (yes, there are such things)
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