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By ANDREI CODRESCU | April 24, 1995
New Orleans. -- Just published: ''The Adventures of Dr. Alphabet,'' by Dave Morice! The book is subtitled ''104 Unusual Ways to Write Poetry in the Classroom and the Community.'' It is my belief that if Dr. Alphabet's recipes were followed, many of our nation's problems would be solved.Take, for instance, ''the blindfold poem.''In 1977, Dr. Alphabet wrote blindfolded for 10 hours at an art festival in New Hope, Pennsylvania. He became, he tells us, ''more aware of sounds, smells and conversations.
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FEATURES
By Lauren Schein and Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2012
As is the case with many 20somethings looking to kill some "down time" at work, I've developed a pretty healthy relationship with the blogosphere. From daily reads to the love-to-hates, my routine involves a standing date with the half dozen or so on my Rolodex of favorites. These run the gamut from cooking adventures to vapid model types chronicling their daily "my life is a catwalk" shtick, to a few truly decent sites where I honestly care about what they have to say.  Prior to my betrothed status, I would occasionally sneak into the wedding blog world -- quickly exiting before someone yelled "Imposter!"
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NEWS
April 20, 1996
Arnold Neustadter,85, who invented the Rolodex card file to organize phone numbers, died Wednesday in New York.His first successful invention was the spring-mounted personal phone directory that pops up at a given alphabet letter. He named the product Autodex.In the 1940s, he and an engineer developed the famous cylindrical rotating file he called the Rolodex, which found its way into virtually every office in America.His Zephyr American Corp. also is credited with some lesser-known products such as a Swivodex, which is a spill-proof inkwell, and Clipdex, a device stenographers could clip to theknee as an aid in taking dictation.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2001
Joseph Galli Jr. earned a reputation as a master of brand development and product promotion during his 19 years at Black & Decker Corp. Now, with the additional experience of stints at two Internet firms, Galli is marketing himself as a new-and-improved executive. He made the leap from Old Economy to New Economy with great fanfare and enthusiasm when he joined Amazon.com as the No. 2 boss. He felt like the "luckiest guy in the world" when he got the job in June 1999. He wanted to embrace the new millennium.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | June 26, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Topanga artist Chris Burden remembers being struck by "how one-sided" the Vietnam Memorial was when he happened to see a half-scale replica in Plexiglas in 1985.Not only were 57,939 war victims listed only on one side of the Washington monument, the names represented only American losses -- not Vietnamese ones."I thought there's an image here that we are grieving only for one side," he recently recalled. "I remember thinking it was disturbing."Thus was born the inspiration for "The Other Vietnam Memorial," which turned heads last fall when it was unveiled in an exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS | April 18, 1994
"You know, this 'chaos' idea makes sense," a seminar participant began, politely enough, upon collaring me at a break, "but I'm not sure the average person is up to it. We need some stability.""Crazy times call for crazy organizations," I'm fond of saying. The personal implications are daunting, as job security becomes a distant memory and even newly acquired skills turn out to have a half-life of just a few years.But the fact is, I agree with the seminar participant. Not only that, I freely admit that I hate change.
NEWS
By James Sallis | December 11, 1990
Fort Worth, Texas.-- STARING DEEPLY into my eyes she told me, ''I put your number in the Rolodex today.''Not quite the declaration of undying love I'd hoped for -- something along the lines of ''I've waited for you all my life,'' perhaps -- but with age, our perspective on these things changes. We become either more desperate or calmer. More desperate didn't seem humanly possible, so I was working on calm.And for Susan, even though, as she pointed out, leaves were forever falling from that Rolodex never to be seen again, inclusion therein was signal.
FEATURES
By Lauren Schein and Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2012
As is the case with many 20somethings looking to kill some "down time" at work, I've developed a pretty healthy relationship with the blogosphere. From daily reads to the love-to-hates, my routine involves a standing date with the half dozen or so on my Rolodex of favorites. These run the gamut from cooking adventures to vapid model types chronicling their daily "my life is a catwalk" shtick, to a few truly decent sites where I honestly care about what they have to say.  Prior to my betrothed status, I would occasionally sneak into the wedding blog world -- quickly exiting before someone yelled "Imposter!"
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS | August 1, 1994
Power. Backroom politics? Or a part of everyday life? I lean toward the latter definition. Getting anything done, even at home, involves power.So what are the secrets to getting it and applying it? Here are 14, culled from 51 years of often painful experience.* 1. Recognition. Say "thanks" and the person you thank is a pal for life. I've written before on the potency of thank-you notes; taking a half-hour (or 500-mile) detour to say thanks is better yet. Can you overdo it? Nope.* 2. Showing up. Stellar sports agent-entrepreneur Mark McCormick insists that it's frequently worth hopping on a plane and flying 3,000 miles for a five-minute face-to-face meeting.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2001
Joseph Galli Jr. earned a reputation as a master of brand development and product promotion during his 19 years at Black & Decker Corp. Now, with the additional experience of stints at two Internet firms, Galli is marketing himself as a new-and-improved executive. He made the leap from Old Economy to New Economy with great fanfare and enthusiasm when he joined Amazon.com as the No. 2 boss. He felt like the "luckiest guy in the world" when he got the job in June 1999. He wanted to embrace the new millennium.
NEWS
April 20, 1996
Arnold Neustadter,85, who invented the Rolodex card file to organize phone numbers, died Wednesday in New York.His first successful invention was the spring-mounted personal phone directory that pops up at a given alphabet letter. He named the product Autodex.In the 1940s, he and an engineer developed the famous cylindrical rotating file he called the Rolodex, which found its way into virtually every office in America.His Zephyr American Corp. also is credited with some lesser-known products such as a Swivodex, which is a spill-proof inkwell, and Clipdex, a device stenographers could clip to theknee as an aid in taking dictation.
NEWS
By ANDREI CODRESCU | April 24, 1995
New Orleans. -- Just published: ''The Adventures of Dr. Alphabet,'' by Dave Morice! The book is subtitled ''104 Unusual Ways to Write Poetry in the Classroom and the Community.'' It is my belief that if Dr. Alphabet's recipes were followed, many of our nation's problems would be solved.Take, for instance, ''the blindfold poem.''In 1977, Dr. Alphabet wrote blindfolded for 10 hours at an art festival in New Hope, Pennsylvania. He became, he tells us, ''more aware of sounds, smells and conversations.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS | August 1, 1994
Power. Backroom politics? Or a part of everyday life? I lean toward the latter definition. Getting anything done, even at home, involves power.So what are the secrets to getting it and applying it? Here are 14, culled from 51 years of often painful experience.* 1. Recognition. Say "thanks" and the person you thank is a pal for life. I've written before on the potency of thank-you notes; taking a half-hour (or 500-mile) detour to say thanks is better yet. Can you overdo it? Nope.* 2. Showing up. Stellar sports agent-entrepreneur Mark McCormick insists that it's frequently worth hopping on a plane and flying 3,000 miles for a five-minute face-to-face meeting.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS | April 18, 1994
"You know, this 'chaos' idea makes sense," a seminar participant began, politely enough, upon collaring me at a break, "but I'm not sure the average person is up to it. We need some stability.""Crazy times call for crazy organizations," I'm fond of saying. The personal implications are daunting, as job security becomes a distant memory and even newly acquired skills turn out to have a half-life of just a few years.But the fact is, I agree with the seminar participant. Not only that, I freely admit that I hate change.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | June 26, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Topanga artist Chris Burden remembers being struck by "how one-sided" the Vietnam Memorial was when he happened to see a half-scale replica in Plexiglas in 1985.Not only were 57,939 war victims listed only on one side of the Washington monument, the names represented only American losses -- not Vietnamese ones."I thought there's an image here that we are grieving only for one side," he recently recalled. "I remember thinking it was disturbing."Thus was born the inspiration for "The Other Vietnam Memorial," which turned heads last fall when it was unveiled in an exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.
NEWS
By James Sallis | December 11, 1990
Fort Worth, Texas.-- STARING DEEPLY into my eyes she told me, ''I put your number in the Rolodex today.''Not quite the declaration of undying love I'd hoped for -- something along the lines of ''I've waited for you all my life,'' perhaps -- but with age, our perspective on these things changes. We become either more desperate or calmer. More desperate didn't seem humanly possible, so I was working on calm.And for Susan, even though, as she pointed out, leaves were forever falling from that Rolodex never to be seen again, inclusion therein was signal.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 1, 2010
(From the Maryland Politics blog) North Carolina Gov. Bev Perdue spilled the news: as expected, Martin O'Malley was picked today to be the next chairman of the Democratic Governors Association. O'Malley is currently emceeing an association lunch at the St. Regis Washington hotel. He spoke briefly, giving a somewhat nationalized version of his stump speech. As DGA chairman, O'Malley now has the opportunity to expand his Rolodex with Democratic donors from other states, deepen relationships with a network of emerging Democratic leaders and recruit new faces to the party.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2001
Most of the files and other items stolen from a secret Baltimore police Internal Affairs office were recovered by a man who stumbled upon the sensitive material in a trash bin behind a doughnut shop on Eastern Avenue. The Christmas Eve burglary at the department's Integrity Unit has police officials concerned that one of their own might have broken in to compromise corruption cases. Police officials on Tuesday acknowledged the burglary at the undisclosed location in Essex after being questioned by reporters.
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