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By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2010
The Charm City Roller Girls have a message for all those old-time roller derby fans out there: This isn't your grandma's roller derby. "All that stuff is actually completely gone right now," says Hilary Rosensteel, a roller girl almost since the team was founded in 2005. And by "stuff," she means the elbows, extravagant cheating and over-the-top showmanship that, back in the '60s and '70s, made roller derby the female equivalent of professional wrestling. These days, she insists, roller derby is more about competition than show.
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By Linda Burkins and For The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
In roller derby, a name says it all. The Hazard County Hellions, Harford County's only roller derby team, chose a name that seems wild and mischievous, a stark contrast to the responsible citizens who form the team. In this sport, theatrics are just as much a part of a match as athletics, and its players, no matter how shy or timid they seem by day, take on sassy, aggressive alter egos when they lace up their skates. Formed in 2013, the co-ed team is part of MADE (Modern Athletic Derby Endeavor)
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2010
Hilary Rosensteel, better known as Rosie the Rioter to fans of the Charm City Roller Girls, offers sage advice to those who think this might be the life for them. •"No. 1, you have to like to sweat. It is a sport. Roller derby definitely draws a lot of people for different reasons, a lot of creative types. But there's also people who have never played sports before. I think people leave sometimes because they don't like sweating. " •"You really have to like skating.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ericka Alston | January 29, 2013
What's the deal with Tierra? Is she good at playing the game? Crazy? Or just crazy about our Sean? This week started with an immediate Date Card, a one-on-one date for Selma.  The card read “Let's turn up the heat!” Where would he take her and what would they do? A limo ride to a private jet, with a very sensual private flight. Lots of interlocking finger hand holding, with snuggles and hugs. These tow are super comfortable together and you could feel the heat being turned up on the plane.
NEWS
By Linda Burkins and For The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
In roller derby, a name says it all. The Hazard County Hellions, Harford County's only roller derby team, chose a name that seems wild and mischievous, a stark contrast to the responsible citizens who form the team. In this sport, theatrics are just as much a part of a match as athletics, and its players, no matter how shy or timid they seem by day, take on sassy, aggressive alter egos when they lace up their skates. Formed in 2013, the co-ed team is part of MADE (Modern Athletic Derby Endeavor)
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella | lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | November 22, 2009
One minute, Scarlett Black was out on the roller rink, outfitted in helmet and elbow pads, holding her own in a pack of Charm City Roller Girl hopefuls. They furiously circled the floor, crouching low, demonstrating crossovers and abrupt stops. Black's teenage daughter, Amanda, screamed, "Go, Mom, go." But in an instant, the 41-year-old medical analyst tumbled to the ground. Forced from the roller girl tryouts, she sat with an ice pack on her knee and, somehow through it all, a smile on her face, her resolve intact.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.Sragow@baltsun.com | October 2, 2009
Watching the Roller Derby movie "Whip It" is like spending roughly two hours with a frisky group of girls in a female empowerment camp. In the young-adult source book of the same name, the heroine, Bliss Cavendar, says in her first-person narration that "for the record, the roller-derby sisterhood is the real thing, not tainted by that fake you-go-girl, Oprah vibe you get from Noxzema commercials." She states she "really knows this" because "no one actually says 'you go, girl,' " - instead they say things like "you rock the house."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1999
Sixty-four years after his father, Leo, invented the sport, Jerry Seltzer is convinced the time is right for "Roller Derby" to stage a comeback.Not that "Rollerjam," premiering at 8 p.m. Friday on TNN, is exactly the "Roller Derby" of old -- those gladiatorial contests in which men and women on roller skates did their best to bash each other's brains out, all in the name of breaking on through to the other side. "Rollerjam" promises to be louder, brassier, gaudier than its predecessors. Not to mention faster: Those newfangled in-line skates put the traditional "quads" to shame, Seltzer says, increasing skaters' top speeds from 22 to as much as 35 mph."
FEATURES
By Sam Sessa and Meredith Cohn and Sam Sessa and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporters | June 25, 2008
In the glam yet gritty world of roller derby, women may rule the rink, but that hasn't stopped the average Joes of Baltimore's Harm City Homicide from elbowing their way in. Roller derby - the sometimes campy, sometimes brutal sport - has seen a resurgence in recent years, with female leagues such as Baltimore's Charm City Roller Girls taking center stage. But the boys just couldn't stay on the sidelines. "I imagined the feeling was similar to flying," said Tracy Williams, who had been relegated to the infield as a referee for women's matches before forming his own team.
FEATURES
By Andre Mouchard and Andre Mouchard,Orange County Register | December 13, 1998
Perhaps you hadn't noticed, but America's secret national pastime, absent from the television airwaves for several years now, is back and ready to throw another elbow in your face.The once beloved sport-entertainment known as roller derby is mounting its latest comeback as "Roller Jam," and will begin airing on country music channel TNN Jan. 15. And this latest incarnation, both promoters and derby veterans agree, could be the sport's last shot to resurrect itself.Unlike its more violent cousin, pro wrestling, roller derby faded away a few years ago and hasn't mounted much of a comeback.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2010
The Charm City Roller Girls have a message for all those old-time roller derby fans out there: This isn't your grandma's roller derby. "All that stuff is actually completely gone right now," says Hilary Rosensteel, a roller girl almost since the team was founded in 2005. And by "stuff," she means the elbows, extravagant cheating and over-the-top showmanship that, back in the '60s and '70s, made roller derby the female equivalent of professional wrestling. These days, she insists, roller derby is more about competition than show.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2010
Hilary Rosensteel, better known as Rosie the Rioter to fans of the Charm City Roller Girls, offers sage advice to those who think this might be the life for them. •"No. 1, you have to like to sweat. It is a sport. Roller derby definitely draws a lot of people for different reasons, a lot of creative types. But there's also people who have never played sports before. I think people leave sometimes because they don't like sweating. " •"You really have to like skating.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | November 22, 2009
One minute, Scarlett Black was out on the roller rink, outfitted in helmet and elbow pads, holding her own in a pack of Charm City Roller Girl hopefuls. They furiously circled the floor, crouching low, demonstrating crossovers and abrupt stops. Black's teenage daughter, Amanda, screamed, "Go, Mom, go." But in an instant, the 41-year-old medical analyst tumbled to the ground. Forced from the roller girl tryouts, she sat with an ice pack on her knee and, somehow through it all, a smile on her face, her resolve intact.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.Sragow@baltsun.com | October 2, 2009
Watching the Roller Derby movie "Whip It" is like spending roughly two hours with a frisky group of girls in a female empowerment camp. In the young-adult source book of the same name, the heroine, Bliss Cavendar, says in her first-person narration that "for the record, the roller-derby sisterhood is the real thing, not tainted by that fake you-go-girl, Oprah vibe you get from Noxzema commercials." She states she "really knows this" because "no one actually says 'you go, girl,' " - instead they say things like "you rock the house."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Raven Smith and Raven Smith,raven.smith@baltsun.com | October 16, 2008
The weather's getting colder, all your favorite shows are back on TV and squirrels are pelting your car with acorns. It can only mean one thing: Fall is here. With the summer officially kaput, why not recapture some of that back-to-school buzz of your youth by joining a pickup sports team? Here are a few rec centers and groups that offer the fun of gym class with none of the embarrassment - at least until you put on your matching uniforms. 1 Play Baltimore Looking for some fun, friendly competition?
FEATURES
By Sam Sessa and Meredith Cohn and Sam Sessa and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporters | June 25, 2008
In the glam yet gritty world of roller derby, women may rule the rink, but that hasn't stopped the average Joes of Baltimore's Harm City Homicide from elbowing their way in. Roller derby - the sometimes campy, sometimes brutal sport - has seen a resurgence in recent years, with female leagues such as Baltimore's Charm City Roller Girls taking center stage. But the boys just couldn't stay on the sidelines. "I imagined the feeling was similar to flying," said Tracy Williams, who had been relegated to the infield as a referee for women's matches before forming his own team.
FEATURES
By Christopher T. Assaf and Christopher T. Assaf,Sun Photographer | September 27, 2006
Betty Beatdown. Human Soup. Natalie Boh. Molly Melee. The pseudonyms adopted by the 53 women of the Charm City Roller Girls might be whimsical, but the competition and action are genuine: Proof is in the bruises and injuries. The women of the Baltimore roller derby league -- professionals, students, stay-at-home moms -- rolled it out on the hardwood at Putty Hill Skateland in northeast Baltimore County as they competed in the league's inaugural season. Starting in April, four teams -- the Junkyard Dolls, Speed Regime, Night Terrors and Mobtown Mods -- met once a month on a Sunday night.
FEATURES
By Liz Smith and Liz Smith,Tribune Media Services | July 30, 2007
Joe Namath was born in Pennsylvania, but he is a New Yorker's dream figure of a top sports star. The Jets former star athlete once wrote a book titled I Can't Wait Until Tomorrow ... 'Cause I Get Better-Looking Every Day. The book captures his essential qualities of good-humored ego. He was - and remains - a beloved figure in American pop culture. (Remember those delightful pantyhose commercials?) Now it seems Paramount Pictures wants to put Joe's colorful - and not always jolly - life onscreen.
FEATURES
By Liz Smith and Liz Smith,Tribune Media Services | July 30, 2007
Joe Namath was born in Pennsylvania, but he is a New Yorker's dream figure of a top sports star. The Jets former star athlete once wrote a book titled I Can't Wait Until Tomorrow ... 'Cause I Get Better-Looking Every Day. The book captures his essential qualities of good-humored ego. He was - and remains - a beloved figure in American pop culture. (Remember those delightful pantyhose commercials?) Now it seems Paramount Pictures wants to put Joe's colorful - and not always jolly - life onscreen.
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