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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 29, 1997
HONG KONG -- After a marathon 18-hour debate, Hong Kong lawmakers approved a new election law yesterday that critics say is a rollback of democracy under Chinese rule.As the sun rose yesterday morning, the 60-member Provisional Legislature voted to change Hong Kong's electoral system from the "winner-take-all" method similar to the United States' to proportional representation -- a system the government says will prevent one party from dominating the Legislature. Elections are scheduled for May.The Provisional Legislature also limited the number of people who will be allowed to choose the corporate representatives who will occupy 30 of the 60 seats, disenfranchising nearly 2.5 million residents who were eligible to vote through their companies in the last elections.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | September 26, 2013
A leading legislator expects a "very strong push" to repeal Maryland's storm-water fee law when lawmakers return to Annapolis in January, but vows to fight any rollback. Del. Maggie McIntosh , who chairs the House Environmental Matters Committee, told attendees at a "storm-water summit" in Baltimore Wednesday that she expects another effort to negate the 2012 law requiring the city and Maryland's nine largest counties to raise funds for controlling runoff pollution from their communities.
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NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | February 18, 1997
The County Commissioners, who tabled a tax cut proposal a week ago because of legal issues, plan to discuss the measure again this morning.The proposal, first aired by Commissioner W. Benjamin Brown at a news conference Feb. 6, would repeal the 16 percent increase in the county's income tax rate approved by the commissioners in 1995 to raise money to build new schools.The so-called piggyback tax is a percentage of a person's state income tax liability. In Carroll, the percentage is 58 percent, and Brown would like to scale that back to 50 percent.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
Harford County Executive David R. Craig, a leading Republican candidate for governor, called Tuesday for a sweeping rollback of Maryland's environmental laws, saying measures passed by the state's leaders have failed to clean up the Chesapeake Bay. "They say they're aggressive in cleaning it, but they're saying they haven't cleaned it up. So are they being disingenuous about that? Did it actually work? Did it?" he said. "If it did, then why are they saying it's still getting polluted?"
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER and MICHAEL DRESSER,SUN REPORTER | April 27, 2006
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. suggested yesterday that he might support a partial rollback of the state's gasoline tax as a way of easing the burden of rising fuel prices, an idea he has resisted in the past. The governor's comments on possibly easing the tax - which other officials said could not be done until the next General Assembly session, currently set for January - came at the end of a news conference on another subject and were highly conditional. Ehrlich noted that any such action would have a downside because the state's 23.5-cent gas tax is a dedicated source of funding for state and local transportation projects.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1996
Three members of a bustling interstate odometer rollback ring pleaded guilty to conspiracy charges in federal court in Baltimore yesterday, admitting that they clicked back the mileage counters on hundreds of cars that were sold to unsuspecting customers around the country.The men, including a former Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration investigator, were snared in a wide-ranging, 2 1/2 -year federal and state probe into a scheme that reached from New York to Florida to Indiana and wound up swindling consumers out of as much as $5 million.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | May 9, 1992
SAN FRANCISCO -- In the first case completed under a voter-initiated rollback of automobile insurance rates, California's insurance commissioner yesterday ordered 20th Century Insurance Co. to pay more than $100 million in refunds to 650,000 policyholders.But company officials, contending that their rates were among the industry's lowest, said they planned to appeal the rebates in California state courts.Insurers had fought the voter initiative, known as Proposition 103, before it was passed in November 1988, and most have continued to oppose its provisions in court.
SPORTS
By Helene Elliott and Helene Elliott,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 15, 2004
TORONTO - The NHL and the players union exchanged insults and accusations yesterday and made no progress toward a new labor deal, chilling their relations as the league's lockout of players reached the three-month mark. In their second meeting in six days, the NHL rejected a union proposal centered on a 24 percent salary rollback and a luxury tax triggered at $45 million. The union, in turn, rejected a counterproposal by the NHL to set salaries at 54 percent of revenue because it sees a salary cap as an unacceptable restriction of the marketplace.
NEWS
March 3, 1996
THE CONCLUSIONS of a presidential panel on balancing economic growth with environmental protection offer hope for a bipartisan effort to move beyond polarization on this fundamental issue.A three-year study by this group stresses the need for business flexibility in preventing pollution and for tax incentives to reduce waste and environmental harm. Innovation can achieve higher performance in pollution control than rigid rules and procedures.Yet the council also defended existing environmental standards.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN and JANE BRYANT QUINN,1993, Washington Post Writers Group | September 26, 1993
NEW YORK -- Good news for savers. The government is forcing a reluctant credit-union industry to do the right thing.At issue has been the new "truth-in-savings law," which took effect last June for banks and S&Ls. Credit unions sought an exemption from the law's main goals. After first favoring the exemption, the National Credit Union Administration (NCUA), which regulates the industry, concluded that no loopholes were allowed. Under final NCUA rules, promulgated this month, the whole truth is expected of credit unions, too.The truth-in-savings legislation requires depository institutions to pay interest on every dollar you keep on deposit every day (no cheating, by paying zero on a portion of your money, as happened before the law was passed)
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2010
Republican former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. says he would chop $126 million in education funding that goes primarily to Baltimore and Montgomery and Prince George's counties and use the savings to offset a penny rollback to the state's sales tax. Ehrlich, who is campaigning to win back his old job, said Wednesday that he views spending the money as "discretionary" — a position similar to the one he held when in office. He would prefer to lower the state's sales tax to make it more competitive with Washington and Delaware and encourage consumer spending.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2010
So you want to be a cop in Baltimore City? Your $42,289 starting salary will be competitive compared with those of your suburban neighbors — slightly higher than in Anne Arundel County, but a few thousand dollars lower than in Baltimore County. But just for the moment, think ahead. In 10 years with the city, your salary as a city beat cop will top out at just under $60,000. Your friends on the Baltimore County force will be pulling in more than $68,000 a year. Stay for 20 years?
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER and MICHAEL DRESSER,SUN REPORTER | April 27, 2006
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. suggested yesterday that he might support a partial rollback of the state's gasoline tax as a way of easing the burden of rising fuel prices, an idea he has resisted in the past. The governor's comments on possibly easing the tax - which other officials said could not be done until the next General Assembly session, currently set for January - came at the end of a news conference on another subject and were highly conditional. Ehrlich noted that any such action would have a downside because the state's 23.5-cent gas tax is a dedicated source of funding for state and local transportation projects.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2005
Maryland property owners wouldn't get a tax break in the coming year, but school construction would get a $50 million boost under a state budget plan agreed to late yesterday by General Assembly negotiators. After hours of private meetings between House and Senate fiscal leaders, the House of Delegates agreed to drop its push for a rollback of the state portion of the property tax, which was increased in 2003 under a budget balancing compromise with Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. House leaders had wanted to give homeowners a break of $48 for each $100,000 of their home's property value.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2005
The House of Delegates unanimously approved a $26 billion budget for fiscal 2006 last night, including a rollback of the property tax increase Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. proposed two years ago. The bill passed with virtually no debate as Republicans praised Ehrlich's proposal and thanked the chamber's Democratic leaders for taking their concerns seriously. "There was a lot of give-and-take in the budget, and that was reflected in the vote on the floor," said House Speaker Michael E. Busch.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2005
In a ruling that drastically overhauls the way the nation's federal defendants are sentenced, the U.S. Supreme Court found the current system unconstitutional yesterday and said judges will no longer be required to follow the 17-year-old federal sentencing guidelines. In its 5-4 ruling, the court specifically criticized a routine practice under the system, in which a judge may increase a defendant's prison time based on evidence a jury has not considered - the amount of drugs a defendant possessed, for instance, or whether he was the ringleader of a gang.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | December 16, 2004
YES, NORTHERN Virginia, there is a Santa Claus. The dithering D.C. Council has left an opening that may be wide enough for the Virginia Baseball Stadium Authority to drive a team bus carrying the Washington Nationals all the way into the suburbs, and I can't wait to see how this latest twist in the District stadium drama plays out. The Anacostia waterfront ballpark may still get built, but the hopes of baseball fans in Northern Virginia and even Las...
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,Staff Writer | July 16, 1992
NEW YORK -- Former Gov. Jerry Brown of California, still declining to formally endorse Gov. Bill Clinton, had his name placed in nomination for president last night, pledging to keep fighting to gain "power for the powerless" and to reform politics in the Democratic Party and the country.Throughout his speech, Mr. Brown never mentioned the Arkansas governor; the closest he came to indicating support for the Clinton-Gore ticket came at the end, when he said: "I intend to fight for this party tonight, tomorrow and every year.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | December 16, 2004
YES, NORTHERN Virginia, there is a Santa Claus. The dithering D.C. Council has left an opening that may be wide enough for the Virginia Baseball Stadium Authority to drive a team bus carrying the Washington Nationals all the way into the suburbs, and I can't wait to see how this latest twist in the District stadium drama plays out. The Anacostia waterfront ballpark may still get built, but the hopes of baseball fans in Northern Virginia and even Las...
SPORTS
By Helene Elliott and Helene Elliott,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 15, 2004
TORONTO - The NHL and the players union exchanged insults and accusations yesterday and made no progress toward a new labor deal, chilling their relations as the league's lockout of players reached the three-month mark. In their second meeting in six days, the NHL rejected a union proposal centered on a 24 percent salary rollback and a luxury tax triggered at $45 million. The union, in turn, rejected a counterproposal by the NHL to set salaries at 54 percent of revenue because it sees a salary cap as an unacceptable restriction of the marketplace.
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