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NEWS
October 23, 2012
If anyone has ever wondered why the Ravens are universally recognized as a first-class organization, let me share a recent game-day experience . Sure, it was a frenzied crowd and a dramatic finish, but I am referring to the unforgettable day that the Ravens and M&T Bank provided the scholars of Boys Hope Girls Hope of Baltimore. The team recognized BHGH Baltimore's service to the community with tickets to the Cowboys game, field passes prior to the game, T-shirts, thunder sticks and a stadium announcement (complete with appearance on the big screen)
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NEWS
October 4, 2014
Let's once and for all put to rest the idea that athletes and entertainers are "role models. " Every time I read or hear a parent say their son or daughter "really looks up to (fill in the blank)," I just want to vomit. I am not sure when this idea of celebrities "role models" came about, but it is time for it to end. Just because these individuals are high-profile doesn't mean they are worthy of admiration. They are highly paid and excel in their fields, but they are also human and can make poor decisions just like the rest of us. In just the last month Baltimore has seen no less than three high-profile athletes dominate the national news for making very stupid decisions.
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NEWS
September 17, 2014
As a retired speech professor who has taught many elements of argument for a very long time, maybe I can help you. I read your recent piece associating the NFL with a responsibility for disciplining players for activities that I don't believe have anything directly to do with what they actually get paid for, which is playing football ( "NFL now must tackle child abuse," Sept. 15). Unless there is something that I obviously wouldn't know about in the player's contract requiring such intervention - not given in your editorial - we have a major link missing in your advocacy.
NEWS
September 17, 2014
As a retired speech professor who has taught many elements of argument for a very long time, maybe I can help you. I read your recent piece associating the NFL with a responsibility for disciplining players for activities that I don't believe have anything directly to do with what they actually get paid for, which is playing football ( "NFL now must tackle child abuse," Sept. 15). Unless there is something that I obviously wouldn't know about in the player's contract requiring such intervention - not given in your editorial - we have a major link missing in your advocacy.
NEWS
October 4, 2014
Let's once and for all put to rest the idea that athletes and entertainers are "role models. " Every time I read or hear a parent say their son or daughter "really looks up to (fill in the blank)," I just want to vomit. I am not sure when this idea of celebrities "role models" came about, but it is time for it to end. Just because these individuals are high-profile doesn't mean they are worthy of admiration. They are highly paid and excel in their fields, but they are also human and can make poor decisions just like the rest of us. In just the last month Baltimore has seen no less than three high-profile athletes dominate the national news for making very stupid decisions.
NEWS
By LEONARD KRIEGEL | September 4, 1992
Back in the embattled 1970s, Americans were deluged by demands for ''relevant theater,'' ''relevant education,'' ''relevant music,'' even ''relevant welfare.'' We didn't wake up until confronted with ''relevant diets.''Now, ''relevant'' is mocked out of usage. Like most language jTC victories, however, the triumph was short-lived. Instead of ''relevant,'' we have ''suitable role model.''What America's young need, we are incessantly told, are ''suitable role models.'' We may have produced a generation lacking literacy, skill, even a sense of style.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | September 23, 1991
Has it been noted anywhere that Judge Robert M. Bell now sits on the same court that once upheld his conviction? There hardly seems the chance that such irony was pointed out, in that Judge Bell's ascent to the Maryland Court of Appeals went by with scant media coverage. The politics of his appointment might have been well-documented, but his actual oath-taking was barely noted, and therein lies a story.Bell, a highly regarded black jurist, took the seat that had been occupied since the 1970s by Harry A. Cole, the first black appointed to the state's highest court.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,Sun Staff Writer | January 16, 1995
Robert Eades wants young area blacks to look at his calendar each day and see that they can be successful without being basketball star Michael Jordan.It is a lesson Mr. Eades, a former drug dealer, had to learn himself."I looked in the mirror one day and said, 'I'm going to make changes in this world and in my community, but first I'm going to make a change within myself and believe in myself,' " said Mr. Eades, who has served time in jail.Now he is selling about 1,000 of his calendars to help raise money for two area youth groups.
NEWS
By RICHARD RODRIGUEZ | June 9, 1993
The other day I got a call from a high school teacher. Would I come to her class? ''It would be so important for our brown and black students to see you. They need good role models. They need to know that they, too, can become journalists,'' she said.I do not like the idea of role models. Listen to the term -- how middle class it is, how flat in human understanding. Role. Model. The term reduces the influence adults might have on children to something occupational, a mere role, like an actor's mask.
NEWS
By Calvin Watkins | August 26, 1994
LOCALLY AND nationally, the past couple of weeks haven't been great for African-American men in the limelight.On the home front, former Dunbar football and basketball coach Pete Pompey, according to a report obtained from the State's Attorney's office, took some $51,000 raised by Dunbar's concession-stand sales at Orioles games and deposited the money into an unauthorized account. But the state's attorney decided there wasn't enough evidence to prosecute.Nationally, the NAACP ousted its executive director, the Rev. Benjamin Chavis, for not informing the board or counsel about an agreement to pay a temporary employee up to $332,400 in NAACP funds to settle sexual harassment and sex discrimination allegations.
NEWS
September 9, 2014
Janay Rice's public message today about the Ravens' decision to cut her husband, running back Ray Rice, and the NFL's decision to ban him for life after a video was published showing him knocking her unconscious is likely to have precisely the opposite of the effect she desired, drawing more attention to what is for her, a painful family matter. In a post on her Instagram account, Ms. Rice condemned the media and the public for causing her family anguish and forcing them to relive "a moment we regret every day. " She added: "If your intentions were to hurt us, embarrass us, make us feel alone, take all happiness away, you've succeeded on so many levels.
NEWS
By Michelle Jefferson | July 10, 2014
I came of age in 1980, just as the women's movement hit its full stride, and those were the days. At my first real job I had sign that read: "Women have to do twice as much to be thought of half as good as men; luckily, this is not difficult. " Unlike our mothers and grandmothers, we faced an open world of opportunity, possibilities, goals and achievable dreams. No more would we be limited to being receptionists, nurses and teachers - you know, the girls-only jobs. In fact, I and most of my girlfriends were in the science/math curriculum in school and attended some form of college.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
In a span of three short months, Albany's trio of brothers Miles and Lyle Thompson and cousin Ty Thompson have graced the front page of The New York Times and the cover of the Inside Lacrosse magazine. In doing so, they have becomes role models for the lacrosse-playing youngsters at the Onondaga Reservation in upstate New York where they grew up. “A lot of little kids on our reservation hit us up on the social networks,” Miles Thompson said as the No. 19 Great Danes traveled to Baltimore for Friday night's game against No. 10 Johns Hopkins at Homewood Field in Baltimore.
NEWS
January 25, 2014
As someone who has spent more than 50 years in education and, more importantly, in developing the character of the young men who passed through Boys' Latin's doors, Richard Sherman's outburst after the Seattle Seahawks victory saddens me greatly ( "Richard Sherman was out of line," Jan. 20). Many of our professional athletes fail to recognize they are role models for the fans of all ages. Mr. Sherman's outburst is another glaring example of a complete failure to win with grace and humility.
NEWS
November 26, 2013
It was really great to read The Sun article about Peter Angelos' donation to the Franklin Square's lung center ("Angelos donates $2.5M for lung center at Franklin Square," Nov. 21). I have listened to all the negative voices calling for his head since he bought the Orioles to keep them the Baltimore Orioles. Mr. Angelos is the poster boy of the American dream, rising from a humble Greektown family to one of the most successful lawyers in the country. He never turned his back on his city or his state, and he continues to "redistribute the wealth" in a profound, personal way. Over the years he has shunned the publicity for the myriad donations he has made to various organizations throughout Maryland.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | October 12, 2013
It's the 40th anniversary of Erica Jong's "Fear of Flying," which some have described as a breakthrough book for women and for modern feminism. Reduced to its common (and I do mean common) denominator, the book, which was written in the appropriately named "Me" Decade of the '70s, encourages women to behave like promiscuous men, having meaningless sex without fear of consequences. "Fear of Flying" gleefully encourages women to engage in the so-called "ZF. " Don't know what that means?
NEWS
By Clarence Page | September 1, 1999
CHICAGO -- If you pay much attention to the presidential campaign (and these days our numbers seem to me to be remarkably few), you will hear a lot of talk about who is setting the best example for young people.President Clinton's scandal with Monica Lewinsky was a particularly strong issue with Republicans. Some viewed with alarm a front-page Washington Post story last spring about an apparent upsurge in oral sex among students at a local middle school. It quoted one eighth-grade girl as excusing her act with, "President Clinton does it."
NEWS
By GARLAND L. THOMPSON | April 4, 1992
Despite the hopes of some observers, ''Boyz N the Hood'' was bypassed at the Oscars. ''Silence of the Lambs'' swept up the gold. It had already swept a lot more at the box office, which brings up a question:Where were all those folks who beat up on Spike Lee, Warrington Hudlin and Mario Van Peebles over the violence and abusive relationships in their movies when young black Americans were lining up to see ''Silence''?Anthony Hopkins created a surpassingly evil Hannibal Lecter, and he justly won Best Actor.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | October 7, 2013
When Baltimore City Police Commissioner Anthony Batts addressed the Roland Park Civic League last May at Roland Park Elementary/Middle School, he urged members of "a sophisticated community" to find ways of using their skills and expertise to help "save Baltimore as a whole. " "We are Baltimore," he said. Now, the public school and the Roland Park Civic League are taking Batts' advice to heart. They are collaborating on a new mentoring program to help middle school students from outside Roland Park adjust to a school in an unfamiliar area.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
The relationship between some members of the Baltimore Ravens and the community runs deeper than just on-field victories. And Friday, the USA cable channel features one of the those players, linebacker Jameel McClain, in a film about the way he reached out to a homeless boy in our city. "NFL Characters Unite," an hour-long documentary of professional football players sharing stories of obstacles they have overcome, features Justin Tuck (New York Giants), Troy Polamalu (Pittsburgh Steelers)
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