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Roland Flint

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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2001
Dr. Roland Flint, the former Maryland poet laureate whose lyrical reminiscences of ordinary events - such as the taste of a salty oyster - earned him wide acclaim, died Tuesday of cancer at his Kensington home. He was 66. Dr. Flint was appointed poet laureate in 1995 and resigned in October because of health problems. "The real reason is, I just thought I had served long enough. It's an honorary post, and why not let someone else have a chance?" he told The Sun at the time. From 1968 until he retired in 1997, he taught creative writing and literature at Georgetown University in Washington.
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By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2002
When the late Roland Flint, former Maryland poet laureate, would read to students for the Howard County Poetry and Literature Society, the organization's president often would sit in the classroom and watch with awe the students' captivated faces. "He was just extraordinary," Ellen Conroy Kennedy said. "I never felt that we did our mission more than on those occasions." Flint, who died of cancer in January 2001 at age 66, meant a lot to Kennedy and HoCoPoLitSo, participating in more than 40 events in 24 years.
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NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2002
When the late Roland Flint, former Maryland poet laureate, would read to students for the Howard County Poetry and Literature Society, the organization's president often would sit in the classroom and watch with awe the students' captivated faces. "He was just extraordinary," Ellen Conroy Kennedy said. "I never felt that we did our mission more than on those occasions." Flint, who died of cancer in January 2001 at age 66, meant a lot to Kennedy and HoCoPoLitSo, participating in more than 40 events in 24 years.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2001
Dr. Roland Flint, the former Maryland poet laureate whose lyrical reminiscences of ordinary events - such as the taste of a salty oyster - earned him wide acclaim, died Tuesday of cancer at his Kensington home. He was 66. Dr. Flint was appointed poet laureate in 1995 and resigned in October because of health problems. "The real reason is, I just thought I had served long enough. It's an honorary post, and why not let someone else have a chance?" he told The Sun at the time. From 1968 until he retired in 1997, he taught creative writing and literature at Georgetown University in Washington.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1995
Like children at storytelling hour, students circle Roland Flint. But there is no need. He is big and burly and his soothing, deep voice rumbles into all corners of the classroom. He leans forward, as though into the poem he is reciting. It is about plums. Little by little, his low voice entrances. The plums are so sweet and so cold they can nearly be tasted. Slouchers straighten. Note-taking stops. Listening begins.For 36 years, Dr. Flint has shared with students his love of poetry. It is a love that has led him to read aloud in elementary schools, in prisons and on ABC's "Nightline."
NEWS
September 28, 1995
The Sundial number for poet Roland Flint published in yesterday's Today section was incorrect. To hear Roland Flint read the poem he is scheduled to deliver during his inauguration as Maryland's poet laureate, dial 783-1800 and enter the four digit code 6214. For other Sundial numbers, see the Sundial directory on Page 2A.The Sun regrets the error.
FEATURES
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 28, 2001
Michael Collier, a Catonsville poet who directs the creative writing program at the University of Maryland, College Park, has been named the state's poet laureate. In making the selection, Gov. Parris N. Glendening called Collier "one of Maryland's treasures, a distinguished scholar who is respected by his peers, his students, and the public for the richness of his craft." Collier, 47, has headed the acclaimed Bread Loaf Writers Conference in Ripton, Vt., since 1994. His latest collection of poems, "The Ledge," is a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | October 27, 2000
After five years of bringing poetry to all corners of the state, Roland Flint will step down on Wednesday from his position as Maryland state poet laureate. "As I said in my letter to the governor, when I took the position, I agreed to visit public schools in all 23 counties and in Baltimore City, and I've done that," he says. (Flint hasn't yet received a response from the governor's office.) Flint, 66, taught poetry at Georgetown University for 29 years. He spent much of his tenure as poet laureate working with Maryland public school students.
NEWS
September 15, 1996
BALTIMORE CATCHES a lot of grief for the motto Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke chose for it, "the city that reads." It seems a joke when one considers problems within the public schools.But Baltimore does have an important literary history and one of the finest public libraries in the nation in the Enoch Pratt. It is therefore appropriate that the city celebrate its first Baltimore Book Festival, Sept. 28-29, at Mount Vernon Place. Indeed, one wonders why it hasn't done so before now.The outdoor event will include storytelling, poetry readings, children's activities, author signings, literary walking tours, book selling, displays by publishing companies, bookbinding demonstrations, live music and a cafe.
FEATURES
By SUN STAFF | November 4, 1999
Daniel Mark Epstein, biographer of Nat King Cole, will be one of about 60 authors appearing Sunday at Book Bash '99, an annual fund-raiser for Baltimore County literacy programs.Book Bash '99 takes place from 6 p.m. to 9: 30 p.m. at the Bibelot bookstore in Festival at Woodholme, 1819 Reisterstown Road, Pikesville. Tickets cost $40 per person in advance, $50 at the door.Diane Rehm, public radio talk-show host and author of "Finding My Voice," is honorary author chairwoman of the event. She will appear at a $150-per-person reception from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1995
Like children at storytelling hour, students circle Roland Flint. But there is no need. He is big and burly and his soothing, deep voice rumbles into all corners of the classroom. He leans forward, as though into the poem he is reciting. It is about plums. Little by little, his low voice entrances. The plums are so sweet and so cold they can nearly be tasted. Slouchers straighten. Note-taking stops. Listening begins.For 36 years, Dr. Flint has shared with students his love of poetry. It is a love that has led him to read aloud in elementary schools, in prisons and on ABC's "Nightline."
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman | October 10, 1994
Writers who desire great honors -- the Nobel, poet laureate for the United States, or the world's richest poetry prize -- may want to try this incantation: HoCoPoLitSo, HoCoPoLitSo, HoCoPoLitSo.That's the accepted shorthand for the Columbia-based Howard County Poetry and Literature Society, which seems to have an uncanny knack for bringing good fortune to its speakers.The society, which celebrates its 20th anniversary next month, snared W. S. Merwin for this weekend's residency. Last month, he was awarded the first-ever Tanning Prize, a $100,000 bequest.
NEWS
By Lois Szymanski and Lois Szymanski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 4, 1996
THE WESTMINSTER High Parent Boosters, Class of 1998 will present Prom Fair '96 for its fifth year. The fair will be held in the lobby of Westminster High School, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 23, and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. March 24.At this annual event, girls can sell their old prom dresses and 25 percent of the profit goes to the Parent Boosters. Dresses may be dropped off in the lobby of the school from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday or March 16 and again from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. March 19.Girls from all over the county may take advantage of this sale of "worn-once" quality prom dresses.
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