Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRogue States
IN THE NEWS

Rogue States

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 14, 2001
WASHINGTON -- President Bush announced yesterday that the United States will withdraw from the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty with Russia, declaring that the move would make this country safer against terrorists and rogue states by lifting restraints on building a defense against incoming missiles. There were no immediate signs that Bush's decision had weakened the two countries' growing partnership on a range of global problems. Russian President Vladimir V. Putin called Bush's action a mistake.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 23, 2011
Reader Christopher Boardman should check his facts before he writes that "Palestine has had its land stolen without compensation for years" ("No reason to deny recognition to Palestine," Sept. 20). What land? The United Nations awarded Israel part of its ancestral homeland in 1948, and the surrounding Arab countries instantly attacked the tiny new state. Why should the U.N. now turn around and give recognition to people who have done nothing but try to annihilate Israel ever since?
Advertisement
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 17, 2004
WASHINGTON - President Bush announced yesterday that he is altering how and where U.S. forces are deployed abroad, closing scores of military installations in Western Europe and redeploying up to 70,000 troops in Europe and Asia to new countries or back to the United States over the next decade. Bush, during a stop in the campaign battleground state of Ohio, said he envisions a more agile and lethal military than the one designed for the Cold War, a reshaped force that could respond quickly to modern threats such as terrorists and rogue states.
NEWS
November 8, 2004
IN RELATIVE terms, Gen. Khin Nyunt was the moderate face of the illegitimate military junta suppressing democracy in long-suffering Myanmar, as Burma's generals renamed their country. But his so-called road map to democracy -- and his talk of reaching an accommodation with arrested pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi -- proved not much more than an illusion to deflect international pressure on the repressive regime. Nonetheless, Gen. Khin Nyunt's recent sacking as prime minister by the junta's strongman, Gen. Than Shwe, is yet more bad news from Yangon.
NEWS
July 3, 2000
ARGUMENTS for a limited national missile defense grow weaker; arguments against, stronger. As the debate proceeds, costs rise and benefits vanish. Whatever the result of a test shot scheduled Friday over the Pacific, President Clinton should not begin construction of a massive radar station in the Aleutians for the program. The buck stops with the next president. The plan is to spend $36 billion to build 100 interceptor rockets over 20 years that, guided by the new radar, would shoot down rockets of rogue states that had only a few. They would not stop states with a lot of missiles.
NEWS
By Jim Anderson | June 27, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Once you know the code, it's easy to tell when policies fail at the State Department. Their names are "disappeared" just as efficiently as political suspects were eliminated in Latin American dictatorships. Policy names that are no longer useful are exterminated, like the Kremlin used to expunge names and faces from photographs when a member of the Politburo fell out of Stalin's favor. The latest example of this semantic cleansing at the State Department is "rogue," as in "rogue states."
NEWS
November 2, 2001
THE TERRORIST attacks of Sept. 11 cured the Bush administration of its former unilateralist, "we are the only superpower" rhetoric. Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld's delay of tests of the proposed missile shield, which would contravene the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty, was a welcome step taken in quest of a greater prize. It creates anticipation for the three-day visit of Russian President Vladimir Putin beginning Nov. 13. Hints have been dropped by both sides of a possible renegotiation of the ABM Treaty to permit the tests, along with reductions in warheads.
NEWS
September 7, 2000
PRESIDENT CLINTON did right in postponing a decision on deployment of the limited nuclear missile defense until the next presidency. To have pressed past the point of no return now would have been somewhere between folly and disaster. The arguments against are growing while those supporting the proposal are tentative at best. The Pentagon is reported to be postponing its next test of feasibility until January for technical reasons, two out of three tests having failed. The Navy has an alternative idea of how to do it. To start building a radar station in the Aleutians for deployment would break the antiballistic missile treaty with Russia on which nuclear stability rests, provoke China and alienate allies for a defense that so far does not work against a danger that has receded.
NEWS
By Ray Takeyh | September 8, 2000
WASHINGTON -- At a time when U.S. global power seems absolute, the presidential candidates are assiduously avoiding thorny international security issues. Such complacency is misguided because the U.S. faces a greater terrorist threat now than at any point in the past. The next president will have to confront not just the challenge of rogue states but also free-lance terrorists such as Osama bin Laden. There is much confusion and ambivalence in the higher echelons of government about how to address this augmented threat of terrorism.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 27, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Americans concerned about President Bush's single-minded campaign for a pre-emptive military attack against Iraq should read his new report to Congress spelling out a "National Security Strategy" for this country. It serves notice that he intends his prospective actions in Iraq not to be some one-shot gambit but rather the opening volley of an ongoing superpower policy against terrorism and purveyors of weapons of mass destruction in a new, more perilous world. One who did take a good look at the report, former Vice President Al Gore, was moved afterward to break the virtual code of silence among Democrats about Mr. Bush's Iraq plans with a withering assault charging the president with a dangerous diversion of focus from the war on terrorism.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 17, 2004
WASHINGTON - President Bush announced yesterday that he is altering how and where U.S. forces are deployed abroad, closing scores of military installations in Western Europe and redeploying up to 70,000 troops in Europe and Asia to new countries or back to the United States over the next decade. Bush, during a stop in the campaign battleground state of Ohio, said he envisions a more agile and lethal military than the one designed for the Cold War, a reshaped force that could respond quickly to modern threats such as terrorists and rogue states.
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 6, 2003
MOSCOW - Much of Russia's huge stockpile of nerve gas, weapons-grade nuclear material and biological agents has yet to be safeguarded from terrorists and so-called rogue states because Moscow will not allow U.S. experts to visit the sites to devise security improvements, a U.S. government report warns. Russia has the world's largest storehouse of chemical weapons - 40,000 metric tons - as well as 600 metric tons of weapons-grade nuclear material, up to 25,000 nuclear warheads and an extensive biological weapons infrastructure left over from the Soviet era. After the Soviet Union dissolved in 1991, Moscow agreed with Washington that its stockpiles of weapons of mass destruction should be secured against the threat of theft by terrorists or by corrupt insiders willing to sell it. But Moscow has grown reluctant to grant the United States access to hundreds of nuclear, chemical and biological sites scattered from Russia's Arctic coast to the Kazakh border, according to a report by inspectors with the U.S. General Accounting Office, the investigative arm of Congress.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 27, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Americans concerned about President Bush's single-minded campaign for a pre-emptive military attack against Iraq should read his new report to Congress spelling out a "National Security Strategy" for this country. It serves notice that he intends his prospective actions in Iraq not to be some one-shot gambit but rather the opening volley of an ongoing superpower policy against terrorism and purveyors of weapons of mass destruction in a new, more perilous world. One who did take a good look at the report, former Vice President Al Gore, was moved afterward to break the virtual code of silence among Democrats about Mr. Bush's Iraq plans with a withering assault charging the president with a dangerous diversion of focus from the war on terrorism.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 13, 2002
HAVANA - Former President Jimmy Carter began a five-day visit to Cuba yesterday with a promise from President Fidel Castro that he could inspect any of the island's biotechnology research facilities. The offer, made at a welcoming ceremony, seeks to blunt allegations by the State Department on May 6 that Cuba had developed a limited capacity to make biological weapons and that it had shared biotechnology with "rogue" nations. Carter, who is here with a small delegation from his Atlanta-based Carter Center, had already been scheduled to visit a genetic engineering facility that is a showcase for the Cuban government.
NEWS
March 28, 2002
IS A LITTLE nuclear bomb more dangerous than a big one? Sure, the big ones can do a lot of damage, but they have a way of not being used. We've never had to flatten Moscow. It was unthinkable - and unnecessary. But what if we changed our thinking, and started making little ones - with low fallout, precision guidance and a doctrine that, for instance, calls a bioweapons bunker in Iraq a legitimate nuclear target? Under the right circumstances, wouldn't we be tempted to give one of them a try?
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 14, 2001
WASHINGTON -- President Bush announced yesterday that the United States will withdraw from the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty with Russia, declaring that the move would make this country safer against terrorists and rogue states by lifting restraints on building a defense against incoming missiles. There were no immediate signs that Bush's decision had weakened the two countries' growing partnership on a range of global problems. Russian President Vladimir V. Putin called Bush's action a mistake.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and Tom Bowman and David L. Greene and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 12, 2001
WASHINGTON - President Bush said yesterday that the world was getting "the first glimpses of a new American military" but that the transformation of the armed services into a high-tech force equipped to battle enemies of the 21st century must be accelerated. The president called the war in Afghanistan a "proving ground" for a strategy he embraced two years ago: Overhauling a largely Cold War-era military so it has all the technology, precision weapons and training it needs to devastate rogue states or terror groups that attack America.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | March 22, 1999
MARCH MUDNESS -- you know what I'm talking about? You don't have to be a Terps fan to experience it. Just look at your shoes. Look at your car. Look at the back yard. Look at the front yard. This is the month we move through the muck on the way to more muck. April is muck with tulips. You know what I'm talking about? You ought to. Mudness is everywhere. It leaves a gray film all over your attitude. Not to mention your windshield. Ever get stuck without wiper fluid while driving?
NEWS
By David L. Greene and Tom Bowman and David L. Greene and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 12, 2001
WASHINGTON - President Bush said yesterday that the world was getting "the first glimpses of a new American military" but that the transformation of the armed services into a high-tech force equipped to battle enemies of the 21st century must be accelerated. The president called the war in Afghanistan a "proving ground" for a strategy he embraced two years ago: Overhauling a largely Cold War-era military so it has all the technology, precision weapons and training it needs to devastate rogue states or terror groups that attack America.
NEWS
November 2, 2001
THE TERRORIST attacks of Sept. 11 cured the Bush administration of its former unilateralist, "we are the only superpower" rhetoric. Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld's delay of tests of the proposed missile shield, which would contravene the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty, was a welcome step taken in quest of a greater prize. It creates anticipation for the three-day visit of Russian President Vladimir Putin beginning Nov. 13. Hints have been dropped by both sides of a possible renegotiation of the ABM Treaty to permit the tests, along with reductions in warheads.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.