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NEWS
January 1, 2006
On December 25, 2005, JAMES ROGER SMITH, husband of Robin Smith. On Monday, friends may call at Compassion Funeral Services, 119-121 S. Stricker Street, where the family will receive friends from 12 to 6 P.M. On Tuesday, services will be held at The House of Judah Ministries, Inc., 3836 W. Forest Park Avenue, where the family will receive friends from 10:30 to 11 A.M. with services to follow. Inquires to 410-566-5500.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2011
Woodward Reese "Wood" Smith, a retired ironworker who during his nearly 50-year career worked on some of the nation's most notable bridges, died July 13 of pneumonia at his Loch Raven Village home. He was 93. The son of a construction superintendent and a homemaker, Mr. Smith was born and raised in New Market, Pa., and was a 1935 graduate of New Cumberland High School. Mr. Smith worked as a laborer for the Pennsylvania Railroad. After attending business college for a year in Harrisburg, he went to work for Bethlehem Steel Corp.
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FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 1, 2006
Near the start of the documentary Who Killed the Electric Car? General Motors bigwig Roger Smith -- the villainous CEO of Michael Moore's Roger & Me -- orders his troops to build on the technology they invented for an electric race car and construct an electric car for consumers. This would fit a (now-defunct) California mandate requiring a certain number of automobiles to have zero emissions and put GM ahead of its competitors by two or three years. Who Killed the Electric Car? (Sony Pictures Classics)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 1, 2006
Near the start of the documentary Who Killed the Electric Car? General Motors bigwig Roger Smith -- the villainous CEO of Michael Moore's Roger & Me -- orders his troops to build on the technology they invented for an electric race car and construct an electric car for consumers. This would fit a (now-defunct) California mandate requiring a certain number of automobiles to have zero emissions and put GM ahead of its competitors by two or three years. Who Killed the Electric Car? (Sony Pictures Classics)
NEWS
September 11, 2005
On Sept. 13, 1779, the Rev. Charles Sewall purchased from Martin Preston of Harford County 2 acres that were part of Denis' Choice to be the site of St. Ignatius Church. The church in Hickory was founded as a Jesuit mission. Part of the present chapel structure dates from the original chapel built in 1792. The church was dedicated by Archbishop John Carroll on Sept. 27, 1792. It became an established parish in 1815 with the appointment of the Rev. Roger Smith as pastor. -- "St. Ignatius, Hickory, and its Missions," by Clarence V. Joerndt; Maryland State Archives Web site
NEWS
By Ralph Nader | December 30, 1991
GENERAL MOTORS produced its biggest lemon ever just in time for Christmas.The giant auto maker announced the closing of 21 plants in North America and the loss of more than 70,000 jobs by the mid-1990s. The number of GM workers left, blue-collar and white-collar, will be half of those laboring in 1985.This shrinkage occurred after a decade in which GM executives rTC identified four scapegoats and obtained what they wanted: lower government taxation, government deregulation, quotas on Japanese imports and concessions from the United Auto Workers.
FEATURES
By Mike Boehm and Mike Boehm,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 30, 2002
Variety was the spice of televised life in the 1960s and '70s, and Ann-Margret was among the hottest flavors on the tube as she strutted her sex appeal and her talents as singer, dancer and actress in a number of TV specials. The titles included From Hollywood With Love, When You're Smiling, Ann-Margret Olsson (her birth name), Ann-Margret Smith (her married name) and Rhinestone Cowgirl. Variety as a televised genre may have all but vanished, but not Ann-Margret, who turned 61 on Sunday.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2011
Woodward Reese "Wood" Smith, a retired ironworker who during his nearly 50-year career worked on some of the nation's most notable bridges, died July 13 of pneumonia at his Loch Raven Village home. He was 93. The son of a construction superintendent and a homemaker, Mr. Smith was born and raised in New Market, Pa., and was a 1935 graduate of New Cumberland High School. Mr. Smith worked as a laborer for the Pennsylvania Railroad. After attending business college for a year in Harrisburg, he went to work for Bethlehem Steel Corp.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 30, 1996
Roger Guenveur Smith knows that the Huey P. Newton most of us remember is a one-dimensional figure -- the angry revolutionary with a rifle in hand and a bandoleer across his chest.But to Smith, whose one-man show, "A Huey P. Newton Story," opens tomorrow at Center Stage, the late co-founder of the Black Panther Party is "a tragic hero of Shakespearean dimensions. In a sense, he's my Hamlet."Smith believes that Newton, like Hamlet, is a man of many contradictions: "In 1966 he founded the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense with Bobby Seale, and he did that on the streets of Oakland, Calif.
NEWS
June 10, 2004
On June 6, 2004; CHARLES J. EBERT, SR, beloved husband of Evelyn; loving father of Linda, Chucky and Diana Ebert and Patty Alger; step-father of Larry and Roger Smith. Also, survived by 16 grandchildren; brother of Michael Ebert. Visitation took place at Kaczorowski Funeral Home, P.A., 2525 Fleet Street on Wednesday from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 PM. A Prayer Service was held at the funeral home at 2:30 PM. Internment will be private.
NEWS
January 1, 2006
On December 25, 2005, JAMES ROGER SMITH, husband of Robin Smith. On Monday, friends may call at Compassion Funeral Services, 119-121 S. Stricker Street, where the family will receive friends from 12 to 6 P.M. On Tuesday, services will be held at The House of Judah Ministries, Inc., 3836 W. Forest Park Avenue, where the family will receive friends from 10:30 to 11 A.M. with services to follow. Inquires to 410-566-5500.
NEWS
September 11, 2005
On Sept. 13, 1779, the Rev. Charles Sewall purchased from Martin Preston of Harford County 2 acres that were part of Denis' Choice to be the site of St. Ignatius Church. The church in Hickory was founded as a Jesuit mission. Part of the present chapel structure dates from the original chapel built in 1792. The church was dedicated by Archbishop John Carroll on Sept. 27, 1792. It became an established parish in 1815 with the appointment of the Rev. Roger Smith as pastor. -- "St. Ignatius, Hickory, and its Missions," by Clarence V. Joerndt; Maryland State Archives Web site
FEATURES
By Mike Boehm and Mike Boehm,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 30, 2002
Variety was the spice of televised life in the 1960s and '70s, and Ann-Margret was among the hottest flavors on the tube as she strutted her sex appeal and her talents as singer, dancer and actress in a number of TV specials. The titles included From Hollywood With Love, When You're Smiling, Ann-Margret Olsson (her birth name), Ann-Margret Smith (her married name) and Rhinestone Cowgirl. Variety as a televised genre may have all but vanished, but not Ann-Margret, who turned 61 on Sunday.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 30, 1996
Roger Guenveur Smith knows that the Huey P. Newton most of us remember is a one-dimensional figure -- the angry revolutionary with a rifle in hand and a bandoleer across his chest.But to Smith, whose one-man show, "A Huey P. Newton Story," opens tomorrow at Center Stage, the late co-founder of the Black Panther Party is "a tragic hero of Shakespearean dimensions. In a sense, he's my Hamlet."Smith believes that Newton, like Hamlet, is a man of many contradictions: "In 1966 he founded the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense with Bobby Seale, and he did that on the streets of Oakland, Calif.
NEWS
By Ralph Nader | December 30, 1991
GENERAL MOTORS produced its biggest lemon ever just in time for Christmas.The giant auto maker announced the closing of 21 plants in North America and the loss of more than 70,000 jobs by the mid-1990s. The number of GM workers left, blue-collar and white-collar, will be half of those laboring in 1985.This shrinkage occurred after a decade in which GM executives rTC identified four scapegoats and obtained what they wanted: lower government taxation, government deregulation, quotas on Japanese imports and concessions from the United Auto Workers.
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