Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRoger Moore
IN THE NEWS

Roger Moore

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | May 29, 1995
Two oldies return to TV tonight: Roger Moore and "Welcome Back Kotter." The former stars in a TV-movie thriller and the latter joins the cable Nick-at-Nite lineup.* "The Nanny" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Miss Fine, Miss Fine, wherefore art thou Miss Fine? Fran (Fran Drescher) is cast as Juliet in an off-Broadway "Romeo and Juliet." And the repeat includes a guest star as Romeo: Peter Marc Jacobson, the series' executive producer and Ms. Drescher's real-life husband. CBS.* "The Man Who Wouldn't Die" (9 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2)
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amazon.com; Publisher's Weekly | November 2, 2008
tuesday Divine Justice : by David Baldacci (Grand Central, $26.99). John Carr, alias "Oliver Stone," is the most wanted man in America. The assassinations he carried out prompt the highest levels of the U.S. government to unleash a huge manhunt. Salvation in Death : by J.D. Robb (Putnam, $25.95). Detective Eve Dallas pieces together the clues in the mysterious death of an East Harlem, N.Y., priest. Midnight : by Sister Souljah (Atria, $26.95). A young Sudanese immigrant struggles to hold onto his traditional values while growing up on New York's meanest streets.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Jack Mathews and Jack Mathews,Newsday | April 27, 1994
When producers Cubby Broccoli and Harry Saltzman bought the rights to Ian Fleming's James Bond novels and were planning for the first in what was to become the most popular film series in history, their wish list of actors to play the British superagent 007 included the 58-year-old Cary Grant and the 52-year-old David Niven.The producers figured that whatever Grant and Niven gave up in physical power and agility, they more than made up for in wit and sophistication. If they couldn't have it all, -- would have to do.James Bond, perhaps the most sublime creation in Cold War fiction, was a matchless fantasy hero for Fleming's mostly male readers.
NEWS
October 14, 2008
On October 8, 2008 HAZEL ROGERS-MOORE. Friends may visit the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME EAST, 1101 E. North Avenue on Wednesday after 8:30 a.m. The family will receive friends at Village Baptist Church, 100 S. Hilton Street on Thursday at 10:30 a.m. Funeral Services will follow at 11:00 a.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan King and By Susan King,Special to the Sun | December 1, 2002
Over the past four decades, James Bond films have had a weird, almost surreal impact on the real spy world. During the opening weekend of one of the recent Bond films, the CIA set up a recruiting booth at theaters. "When the Army was putting together an urban assault vehicle called the SmarTruck, they sat down and watched Bond films," says John Cork, co-author with Bruce Scivally of the new coffee table book James Bond: The Legacy ($29.97, Harry Abrams). "The CIA has this entire thing called the 'James Bond syndrome,' " Cork says.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amazon.com; Publisher's Weekly | November 2, 2008
tuesday Divine Justice : by David Baldacci (Grand Central, $26.99). John Carr, alias "Oliver Stone," is the most wanted man in America. The assassinations he carried out prompt the highest levels of the U.S. government to unleash a huge manhunt. Salvation in Death : by J.D. Robb (Putnam, $25.95). Detective Eve Dallas pieces together the clues in the mysterious death of an East Harlem, N.Y., priest. Midnight : by Sister Souljah (Atria, $26.95). A young Sudanese immigrant struggles to hold onto his traditional values while growing up on New York's meanest streets.
FEATURES
By Cox News Service | July 17, 1991
There are, right this minute, about 30,000 movies, TV shows and how-to titles already available on videotape. Nearly everything that movie studios think could make money is already on sale.But the thing about the video business is that the machine has to be fed, even if there are no longer enough mainline titles to feed it. This summer, aside from the release of "Home Alone" and "Dances With Wolves" in August, there is a more random list of releases than usual, partially because the first part of the year was not exactly chock-full of stirring commercial successes.
NEWS
October 14, 2008
On October 8, 2008 HAZEL ROGERS-MOORE. Friends may visit the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME EAST, 1101 E. North Avenue on Wednesday after 8:30 a.m. The family will receive friends at Village Baptist Church, 100 S. Hilton Street on Thursday at 10:30 a.m. Funeral Services will follow at 11:00 a.m.
NEWS
December 31, 1991
Cassandra Harris, stage and screen actress and wife of actor Pierce Brosnan, died Saturday of ovarian cancer in Los Angeles. She was 39. Miss Harris played a countess opposite Roger Moore in the James Bond film "For Your Eyes Only," and appeared on "Remington Steele," the 1982-1987 NBC detective series in which her husband starred.Elbert Weinberg, 63, a sculptor who gained worldwide acclaim for his works, died Friday in Hartford, Conn. The cause of death wasn't released. During his nearly half-century career, Weinberg won numerous awards, including the Prix de Rome in 1951, a Guggenheim fellowship in 1959 and the Sculpture Award from the American Institute of Arts and Letters in 1969.
FEATURES
By ROGER MOORE | September 30, 2005
Jessica Alba, how do we love thee? Let us photograph the ways. In a bikini. In the gin-clear waters of the Bahamas. Into the Blue is a brutally competent thriller, decently cast, adequately acted and magnificently photographed. Cinematographer Paul Zuccarrini gives us stunning underwater shots and even more stunning under-Alba ones. Paul Walker, who is to "bro" what Keanu Reeves is to "dude," plays Jared, a dive bum living on the margin in the lovely Bahamas with Sam (Alba). Old lawyer-pal Bryce (Scott Caan)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan King and By Susan King,Special to the Sun | December 1, 2002
Over the past four decades, James Bond films have had a weird, almost surreal impact on the real spy world. During the opening weekend of one of the recent Bond films, the CIA set up a recruiting booth at theaters. "When the Army was putting together an urban assault vehicle called the SmarTruck, they sat down and watched Bond films," says John Cork, co-author with Bruce Scivally of the new coffee table book James Bond: The Legacy ($29.97, Harry Abrams). "The CIA has this entire thing called the 'James Bond syndrome,' " Cork says.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | May 29, 1995
Two oldies return to TV tonight: Roger Moore and "Welcome Back Kotter." The former stars in a TV-movie thriller and the latter joins the cable Nick-at-Nite lineup.* "The Nanny" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Miss Fine, Miss Fine, wherefore art thou Miss Fine? Fran (Fran Drescher) is cast as Juliet in an off-Broadway "Romeo and Juliet." And the repeat includes a guest star as Romeo: Peter Marc Jacobson, the series' executive producer and Ms. Drescher's real-life husband. CBS.* "The Man Who Wouldn't Die" (9 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2)
FEATURES
By Jack Mathews and Jack Mathews,Newsday | April 27, 1994
When producers Cubby Broccoli and Harry Saltzman bought the rights to Ian Fleming's James Bond novels and were planning for the first in what was to become the most popular film series in history, their wish list of actors to play the British superagent 007 included the 58-year-old Cary Grant and the 52-year-old David Niven.The producers figured that whatever Grant and Niven gave up in physical power and agility, they more than made up for in wit and sophistication. If they couldn't have it all, -- would have to do.James Bond, perhaps the most sublime creation in Cold War fiction, was a matchless fantasy hero for Fleming's mostly male readers.
FEATURES
By Cox News Service | July 17, 1991
There are, right this minute, about 30,000 movies, TV shows and how-to titles already available on videotape. Nearly everything that movie studios think could make money is already on sale.But the thing about the video business is that the machine has to be fed, even if there are no longer enough mainline titles to feed it. This summer, aside from the release of "Home Alone" and "Dances With Wolves" in August, there is a more random list of releases than usual, partially because the first part of the year was not exactly chock-full of stirring commercial successes.
FEATURES
By ROGER MOORE | October 7, 2005
Here's one for everybody who ever got stiffed on a tip or hit on by an over-the-hill manager. Waiting, written and directed by former waiter Rob McKittrick, is a raunchy, rude, Old School-style look at the world of the waiting and the waited upon. Ryan Reynolds is perfect as Monty, the overage Lothario who's made a career waiting on folks at ShenaniganZ, and of sexing up its underage waitresses. He tells a new recruit, restaurant work is "about learning the routine" - such as how to deal with hateful customers and "push" foods about to spoil in the freezer.
FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 28, 2002
Here's a description from page eight of J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, the first Potter book. "He was tall, thin and very old, judging by the silver of his hair and beard, which were both long enough to tuck into his belt. He was wearing long robes, a purple cloak that swept the ground, and high-heeled buckled boots. His blue eyes were light, bright and sparkling behind half-moon spectacles. And his nose was very long and crooked, as though it had been broken at least twice.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.