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By Dave Rosenthal | April 4, 2013
Rogert Ebert, the Pulitzer Prize-winning film critic who died today, leaves behind a rich legacy, thanks to a shelf-full of books that explore movies -- and his own life. His memoir, "Life Itself," dealt with his battle with alcoholism and the later, losing fight with thyroid cancer. He recounts, as well, his love for -- and exhaustive knowledge of -- movies. I came to admire Ebert, who worked at the Chicago Sun-Times, as he reviewed movies with fellow critic Gene Siskel on their PBS show.
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By Dave Rosenthal | April 4, 2013
Rogert Ebert, the Pulitzer Prize-winning film critic who died today, leaves behind a rich legacy, thanks to a shelf-full of books that explore movies -- and his own life. His memoir, "Life Itself," dealt with his battle with alcoholism and the later, losing fight with thyroid cancer. He recounts, as well, his love for -- and exhaustive knowledge of -- movies. I came to admire Ebert, who worked at the Chicago Sun-Times, as he reviewed movies with fellow critic Gene Siskel on their PBS show.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1999
Gene Siskel was not the most respected of American movie critics; he wasn't even the most accomplished half of "Siskel & Ebert" -- after all, Roger was the one with the Pulitzer Prize.But Siskel had an intense love for movies, a passion that made him as much fan as critic. He once owned the suit John Travolta wore in "Saturday Night Fever" and, for a wedding present, gave colleague Ebert Harpo Marx's horn. And his opinions were neither lowbrow nor high; if his yearly best-film picks included such critical darlings as 1997's "The Ice Storm," 1988's "The Last Temptation of Christ" and 1975's "Nashville," he was just as sincere in defending his pick for 1998, the box-office dud (and critically ignored)
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | January 27, 2012
This week's featured adaptation is "The Grey," a man-versus-nature thriller starring Liam Neeson. Inspired by the short story "Ghost Walker" by Ian Mackenzie Jeffers, who also helped with the screenplay, it's based on a simple, but terrifying, premise: An oil drilling team is stranded in Alaska after a plane crash and faces a pack of wolves. It sounds as grim and unrelenting as "Into the Wild," another book/movie that pitted man against the Alaskan wilderness. Here are some excerpts from reviews: -- Los Angeles Times: Neeson holds it together from first to last.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Rhodes and Steve Rhodes,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 11, 1999
CHICAGO -- The balcony is still open.Five months after Gene Siskel's death, Roger Ebert continues to give the thumbs-up and thumbs-down from the faux movie perch he shared with his film-critic partner for 24 years. Each week he still tapes "Siskel & Ebert," but now with a rotating set of guest critics. He continues to crank out numerous reviews and feature stories for the Chicago Sun-Times, to publish books and host film festivals. Washington Post critic Tom Shales, who was "Siskel & Ebert's" first guest critic when Siskel fell ill with brain cancer, describes Ebert as "possessed."
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,SUN REPORTER | March 3, 2006
Tell me something: When did it become necessary to rob a convenience store in order to afford snacks at the movies? A small popcorn is now $5.50? A small soda is $4.25? A small candy is $2.75? On top of 9 bucks for a ticket? On second thought, knocking over a 7-Eleven or High's might not be enough. You may need to get in on a casino heist in Atlantic City. Nevertheless, those were some of the snack prices at the Regal Cinemas Hunt Valley Stadium 12 recently when we went to see Firewall with Harrison Ford.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2011
Leading up to the big Diner reunion on Dec. 10, The Charles is showing a retrospective of Barry Levinson's "Baltimore films. " The screenings begin on Wednesday, Thanksgiving Eve, with "Avalon "(1990).  Ask 10 people what their favorite moment from the movie is, and all 10 will say it's Lou Jacobi's Thanksgiving Day tantrum. Late again for dinner, Jacobi's Uncle Gabe is stunned to discoverer that his family, this time, didn't wait for him. Roger Ebert called "You cut the turkey without me?
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By Michael Phillips and Michael Phillips,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 25, 2008
Werner Herzog is a magnet for obsessives, and his lovely new film, Encounters at the End of the World, takes you places an ordinary documentary filmmaker might've gone to yet missed completely. At the invitation of the National Science Foundation, Herzog traveled to McMurdo Station in Antarctica, a U.S.-run enclave of 1,100 men and women who study the physical environment. We spend time with ecologists, biologists and survival-school instructors who teach people how not to get lost in a blinding snowstorm.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | January 6, 2012
I was always a big fan of the John le Carre novels, so I'm happy to see the strong reviews for the adaptation of "Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy. " The Cold War seems very distant these days, and his novels, which eschewed shoot-em-up theatrics for a more subtle, almost bureaucratic, espionage, might seem quaint today. Here are excerpts from some reviews: Los Angeles Times: [Director Tomas] Alfredson, for his part, has seen to it that "Tinker Tailor" moves along at a fast-paced, almost electrifying clip.
FEATURES
By SUN REPORTERS | November 23, 2005
A former Baltimore newscaster and a former Indianapolis weatherman -- now two of television's titans -- are scheduled to face off Dec. 1 when Oprah Winfrey appears on Late Show With David Letterman, marking the end of a long icy relationship, or perhaps the beginning of a deeper freeze ahead. The queen of daytime TV appeared on Letterman's show twice when it was on NBC, but had said she wouldn't appear again because she didn't like being the butt of his jokes, as she often is. Dec. 1, however, is opening night for her Broadway production of The Color Purple, just across the street from the old Ed Sullivan Theater, where Letterman's show, now on CBS, is taped.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | January 6, 2012
I was always a big fan of the John le Carre novels, so I'm happy to see the strong reviews for the adaptation of "Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy. " The Cold War seems very distant these days, and his novels, which eschewed shoot-em-up theatrics for a more subtle, almost bureaucratic, espionage, might seem quaint today. Here are excerpts from some reviews: Los Angeles Times: [Director Tomas] Alfredson, for his part, has seen to it that "Tinker Tailor" moves along at a fast-paced, almost electrifying clip.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2011
Leading up to the big Diner reunion on Dec. 10, The Charles is showing a retrospective of Barry Levinson's "Baltimore films. " The screenings begin on Wednesday, Thanksgiving Eve, with "Avalon "(1990).  Ask 10 people what their favorite moment from the movie is, and all 10 will say it's Lou Jacobi's Thanksgiving Day tantrum. Late again for dinner, Jacobi's Uncle Gabe is stunned to discoverer that his family, this time, didn't wait for him. Roger Ebert called "You cut the turkey without me?
FEATURES
By Michael Phillips and Michael Phillips,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 25, 2008
Werner Herzog is a magnet for obsessives, and his lovely new film, Encounters at the End of the World, takes you places an ordinary documentary filmmaker might've gone to yet missed completely. At the invitation of the National Science Foundation, Herzog traveled to McMurdo Station in Antarctica, a U.S.-run enclave of 1,100 men and women who study the physical environment. We spend time with ecologists, biologists and survival-school instructors who teach people how not to get lost in a blinding snowstorm.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | July 25, 2008
Let us now grieve for the thumb. With the demise of the crit-chat show At the Movies with Ebert and Roeper (the last episode will air Aug. 17 on WMAR, Channel 2), the thumb goes on indefinite hiatus. We will no longer see "two thumbs up" or "two thumbs way up" or even "way, way up" in the movie ads. No longer will viewers be fascinated when one critic's thumb's up proves to be another's thumb's down, or when reviewers try to wring subtle gradations from that digit with the cop-out "thumb held sideways."
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,SUN REPORTER | March 3, 2006
Tell me something: When did it become necessary to rob a convenience store in order to afford snacks at the movies? A small popcorn is now $5.50? A small soda is $4.25? A small candy is $2.75? On top of 9 bucks for a ticket? On second thought, knocking over a 7-Eleven or High's might not be enough. You may need to get in on a casino heist in Atlantic City. Nevertheless, those were some of the snack prices at the Regal Cinemas Hunt Valley Stadium 12 recently when we went to see Firewall with Harrison Ford.
FEATURES
By SUN REPORTERS | November 23, 2005
A former Baltimore newscaster and a former Indianapolis weatherman -- now two of television's titans -- are scheduled to face off Dec. 1 when Oprah Winfrey appears on Late Show With David Letterman, marking the end of a long icy relationship, or perhaps the beginning of a deeper freeze ahead. The queen of daytime TV appeared on Letterman's show twice when it was on NBC, but had said she wouldn't appear again because she didn't like being the butt of his jokes, as she often is. Dec. 1, however, is opening night for her Broadway production of The Color Purple, just across the street from the old Ed Sullivan Theater, where Letterman's show, now on CBS, is taped.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | January 27, 2012
This week's featured adaptation is "The Grey," a man-versus-nature thriller starring Liam Neeson. Inspired by the short story "Ghost Walker" by Ian Mackenzie Jeffers, who also helped with the screenplay, it's based on a simple, but terrifying, premise: An oil drilling team is stranded in Alaska after a plane crash and faces a pack of wolves. It sounds as grim and unrelenting as "Into the Wild," another book/movie that pitted man against the Alaskan wilderness. Here are some excerpts from reviews: -- Los Angeles Times: Neeson holds it together from first to last.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | July 25, 2008
Let us now grieve for the thumb. With the demise of the crit-chat show At the Movies with Ebert and Roeper (the last episode will air Aug. 17 on WMAR, Channel 2), the thumb goes on indefinite hiatus. We will no longer see "two thumbs up" or "two thumbs way up" or even "way, way up" in the movie ads. No longer will viewers be fascinated when one critic's thumb's up proves to be another's thumb's down, or when reviewers try to wring subtle gradations from that digit with the cop-out "thumb held sideways."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Rhodes and Steve Rhodes,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 11, 1999
CHICAGO -- The balcony is still open.Five months after Gene Siskel's death, Roger Ebert continues to give the thumbs-up and thumbs-down from the faux movie perch he shared with his film-critic partner for 24 years. Each week he still tapes "Siskel & Ebert," but now with a rotating set of guest critics. He continues to crank out numerous reviews and feature stories for the Chicago Sun-Times, to publish books and host film festivals. Washington Post critic Tom Shales, who was "Siskel & Ebert's" first guest critic when Siskel fell ill with brain cancer, describes Ebert as "possessed."
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1999
Gene Siskel was not the most respected of American movie critics; he wasn't even the most accomplished half of "Siskel & Ebert" -- after all, Roger was the one with the Pulitzer Prize.But Siskel had an intense love for movies, a passion that made him as much fan as critic. He once owned the suit John Travolta wore in "Saturday Night Fever" and, for a wedding present, gave colleague Ebert Harpo Marx's horn. And his opinions were neither lowbrow nor high; if his yearly best-film picks included such critical darlings as 1997's "The Ice Storm," 1988's "The Last Temptation of Christ" and 1975's "Nashville," he was just as sincere in defending his pick for 1998, the box-office dud (and critically ignored)
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