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By Jules Witcover | February 23, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Memo to the Clintons: Enough already! Will the most publicized, not to say boorish, White House departure of a first family since Dick and Pat Nixon got aboard a helicopter on the South Lawn and flew into exile, ever end? The latest disclosure that Hillary Clinton's brother, Hugh Rodham, copped about $400,000 for helping a convicted cocaine dealer and a convicted peddler of fraudulent medicines get a pardon from his illustrious brother-in-law threatens to keep this particular non-musical comedy running as long as "Cats."
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By Sources: Campaign Web sites; Marquis Who's Who in America; Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress; Barack Obama, Dreams From My Father; Robert Timberg, The Nightingale's Song; John McCain and Mark Salter, Faith of My Fathers; wargs.com | February 11, 2008
Hillary Clinton Hillary Diane Rodham was born in Chicago, Oct. 26, 1947, the daughter of Hugh and Dorothy Howell Rodham. She is a graduate of Wellesley College and Yale Law School. After graduation, Hillary Rodham moved to Arkansas and married Bill Clinton, a Yale classmate who would later become governor of Arkansas and the 42nd president of the United States. They have one daughter, Chelsea. In Arkansas, Hillary Clinton ran a legal aid clinic for the poor, became a partner with the Rose Law Firm in Little Rock and led a task force to improve the public schools.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 21, 2000
Voter attitudes toward Rick A. Lazio have turned markedly more negative since June, with suburban women now moving solidly toward Hillary Rodham Clinton and many New Yorkers saying Lazio came across as harsh and inexperienced in his debate with Clinton last week, according to the latest New York Times/CBS News poll. The survey, which began Sept. 14 and was completed Tuesday night, suggested deterioration in Lazio's standing at the time that most politicians believe that voters are beginning serious consideration of the choice before them in the race for Senate.
NEWS
By THOMAS F. SCHALLER | January 23, 2008
Bill Clinton has compared Barack Obama's position on the Iraq war to a "fairy tale." He dismissed the Illinois senator's campaign as based on a "false premise." And he suggested that electing Mr. Obama would be a "roll of the dice." Mr. Clinton is clearly agitated. At first blush, his outbursts and willingness to insert himself into the middle of the contentious battle between his wife and Senator Obama in the Democratic primary appear to reflect the former president's concern about his wife specifically and, more generally, the outcome of his party's presidential nomination.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 29, 1998
WASHINGTON -- With a chuckle, President Clinton turned aside a question yesterday about his wife's role in policy-making by saying, "She's not the president."During a news conference, Clinton was asked whether, "in principle," he supported the creation of a Palestinian state.In May, speaking to a youth summit in Switzerland, Hillary Rodham Clinton suggested it would be "in the long-term interests of peace in the Middle East for there to be a state of Palestine a functioning modern state that is on the same footing as other states."
NEWS
By Washington Bureau | October 27, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton will stop in Baltimore tomorrow to promote his health care reform plan, one day after presenting the finished product to Congress.Mr. Clinton, expected to be accompanied by his wife, Hillary Rodham Clinton, is to address the Johns Hopkins medical community at noon, White House officials said yesterday. The event is to be held at the Newton H. White Jr. Athletic Center on the Homewood campus.Later in the day, Mr. Clinton will campaign in New York City for Mayor David N. Dinkins, who faces a tough challenge in next Tuesday's election, before heading for Boston and the rededication of the John F. Kennedy presidential library on Friday.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 22, 2000
First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton raised between $70,000 and $80,000 for her Senate race in New York at an Annapolis fund-raiser last night, according to Democratic Party sources. Clinton attracted a crowd of about 70 people at the home of Annapolis businessman Thomas L. Siebert, the former ambassador to Sweden. Each paid at least $500 to attend. Clinton is running for the U.S. Senate against Rep. Rick A. Lazio, a Republican from Long Island who entered the race after New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani bowed out. Recent polls show the race to be extremely close.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 18, 1993
SPRINGDALE, Ark. -- President Clinton spent the first day of a two-day vacation swing through northwest Arkansas the way he says he likes to vacation: with relaxation, reading, and a heavy dose of old friends.The day culminated with a surprise birthday party that drew 34 Clinton friends to a well-known family restaurant in Springdale.The president, Hillary Rodham Clinton and daughter Chelsea arrived Monday to spend the two-day sojourn at the summer home of friends Jim and Linda Blair on Beaver Lake, northeast of Fayetteville.
NEWS
By Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Kimberly A.C. Wilson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 16, 2004
WASHINGTON - John Kerry invited Hillary Rodham Clinton to introduce former President Bill Clinton on the opening night of the Democratic National Convention, giving the New York senator the primetime speaking role that some Democrats had sought for her. Kerry's move, which came a day after party members lambasted convention planners for making "a major mistake" in relegating the former first lady to only a segment with eight other women senators, shifts...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 9, 2005
NEW YORK -- Encouraged by New York Republican leaders and some White House officials, Jeanine F. Pirro, the Westchester County district attorney, announced yesterday that she will challenge Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton next year. She immediately accused Clinton of using her post as a steppingstone to the presidency. Pirro, a political moderate who supports abortion rights, gay rights and the death penalty, is seen by many Republicans in New York and Washington as their best hope of pulling off an upset in 2006 by ousting Clinton.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,Sun reporter | January 8, 2008
PORTSMOUTH, N.H. -- Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton exhaustively answered hours of questions from New Hampshire voters yesterday, displaying a cool mastery of topics from health care to global warming as she made a final pitch for her candidacy. But one query broke through her defenses. For a moment, the woman teetering on the cusp of a second consecutive defeat in the race for the Democratic nomination revealed an emotional side rarely seen in public. "My question is very personal," said Marianne Pernold, 64, a freelance photographer attending a Clinton breakfast for undecided voters at a coffee shop in Portsmouth.
NEWS
By THOMAS F. SCHALLER | November 21, 2007
"For 15 years I have stood up against the right-wing machine, and I've come out stronger," Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton said at a Democratic presidential debate this year. "So if you want a winner who knows how to take them on, I'm your girl." Again and again, Mrs. Clinton tells Democratic primary voters she can win the 2008 general election because she knows how to fight the Republicans. And it's true that probably no contemporary public figure outside her marriage has more experience fighting Republicans.
NEWS
By Mark Z. Barabak and Scott Martelle and Mark Z. Barabak and Scott Martelle,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 16, 2007
LAS VEGAS -- Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton stepped down from her front-runner's pedestal and swung back at her Democratic rivals last night in a presidential debate that drew out differences over immigration, foreign policy and the proper tone of an increasingly harsh campaign. The skirmishing started when Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois faintly praised Clinton as "a capable politician" who has run a "terrific campaign." "But what the American people are looking for right now is straight answers to tough questions," Obama said.
NEWS
By PAUL WEST and PAUL WEST,WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF | November 4, 2007
WASHINGTON -- One year before the 2008 election, the Republican Party is a gloomy place. Its congressmen and senators are retiring in droves. Donors are slamming their wallets shut from coast to coast. Worst of all, voters are turning away. Barely one in three Americans now leans Republican, according to the latest opinion survey by the independent Pew Research Center. Republican malaise has given Democrats their widest advantage in voter identification in two decades. So, with the presidency and control of Congress on the line, will '08 be a wipeout for Republicans?
NEWS
By Mark Z. Barabak and Peter Nicholas and Mark Z. Barabak and Peter Nicholas,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 31, 2007
PHILADELPHIA -- Trailing in national polls and with supporters growing restless, Barack Obama challenged Hillary Rodham Clinton's electability and candor in a spirited debate last night. But the Illinois senator failed to rattle the front-runner or do much, it seemed, to shake up the Democratic presidential race. Under fire from the first question, the New York senator smiled through most of the two-hour session, often seconding the views of others on stage and joining the laughter during an attack on Republican Rudolph W. Giuliani.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | October 5, 2007
BOSTON -- This is the High Risk Season of presidential politics, a danger zone for front-runners when the media attention is not on the inevitability of falling leaves but the possibility of falling stars. All summer, the story line was Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton's steady-as-you-go campaign. After one debate or another, the New York Democrat was described as "commanding," "knowledgeable," "experienced." Now even Rudolph W. Giuliani and Fred Thompson are pleading their case for the Republican nomination on the claim that they alone can beat her. This image of a candidate who has passed the presidential readiness test wooed more voters to her side.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 2, 2000
WASHINGTON -- In an upbeat New Year's Day message, President Clinton said yesterday that America is "well poised" to serve as the world's "guiding light" in the new millennium. "Never has the openness and dynamism of our society been more emulated by other countries," he said in his weekly radio address, which was nationally televised from the Oval Office. "Never have our values of freedom, democracy and opportunity been more ascendant in the world." Clinton expressed relief that global celebrations were peaceful and marveled at how "the growing interconnectedness of the world" allowed billions of people to share "the feelings of goodwill and hope that overcame us all."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 30, 1995
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's business partner in the Whitewater land venture entered a not-guilty plea to 19 counts of conspiracy, fraud, making false statements and other charges involving millions of dollars of federally backed loans that went sour. At his arraignment yesterday before a federal magistrate in Little Rock, Ark., the former partner, James B. McDougal, was given a trial date of Oct. 10.Mr. McDougal owned and operated Madison Guaranty Savings & Loan until 1986. Three years later, it collapsed at a cost to taxpayers of more than $60 million.
NEWS
By THOMAS F. SCHALLER | September 26, 2007
I feel sorry for Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton. Not in any lot-in-life way. Mrs. Clinton is a smart, fortunate woman who has enjoyed successes few will ever experience, from being first lady to serving in the U.S. Senate. If Senator Clinton stumbles and loses the Democratic primary contest she comfortably leads - and with it, the chance to be the first major-party female presidential nominee and first female president - don't shed a tear for her. The reason I feel sorry for Mrs. Clinton is that if she wins the Democratic nomination, she assumes the burden of being the Democratic presidential candidate in what may be the most favorable cycle her party has had since 1976.
NEWS
By Stephen Braun and Stephen Braun,Los Angeles Times | February 18, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Old enemies of Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton are out in force. Just weeks after she joined the Democratic Party's flock of presidential contenders, Clinton is being targeted by conservative and Republican-allied activists intent on derailing her campaign before the start of next year's primaries. They have surfaced with a flurry of planned projects: a Michael Moore-style film, book-length exposes, Web sites like StopHerNow and StopHillaryPAC. Conservative admirers of the "Swift Boat Veterans For Truth" media blitz that helped torpedo Democrat John Kerry's candidacy in 2004 are now agitating to "swift-boat" Clinton.
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