Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRodgers And Hammerstein
IN THE NEWS

Rodgers And Hammerstein

NEWS
September 9, 1993
DALLAS -- Jean Eckart, 72, a Broadway, TV and movie set designer, died of lung cancer Monday.In the 1950s and '60s, she and her husband, William, designed sets for the musicals "The Golden Apple," "Li'l Abner," "She Loves Me" and "Mame."The couple received two Tony nominations.Their film work included "Damn Yankees," "The Pajama Game" and "The Night They Raided Minsky's."They designed the 1957 CBS broadcast of Rodgers and Hammerstein's "Cinderella."In 1959, they were co-producersand designers of "Once Upon a Mattress," starring Carol Burnett.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | December 20, 2001
`Cinderella' opening at the Kennedy Center If you missed the hip, multicultural production of Rodgers and Hammerstein's Cinderella at the Mechanic Theatre last year - or if you want to see the show again - you can catch it at Washington's Kennedy Center, where it opens tonight. Eartha Kitt continues in the role of the Fairy Godmother, with Paolo Montalban as Prince Charming and Everett Quinton as the Wicked Stepmother. Jessica Rush, however, has replaced Deborah Gibson in the title role.
NEWS
By Arthur Laupus and Arthur Laupus,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 6, 2001
John Raitt, blues singer Bonnie Raitt's father, played the role in the original stage version in the 1940s. Frank Sinatra was cast and then replaced by Gordon MacRae in the film version in the 1950s, and Robert Goulet toured on stage in the role in the 1970s. Now Russell Sunday inherits the mantle of Billy Bigelow, the sideshow barker and schemer, in Rodgers' and Hammerstein's romantic musical Carousel which opens at Toby's Dinner Theatre tomorrow and continues through Nov. 18. Sunday, who appeared as young Joe Hardy in Toby's most recent production, Damn Yankees, assumes the role of the hopeless dreamer who captures the heart of Julie Jordan, played by Siobhan Kolker.
NEWS
By Nelson Pressley and Nelson Pressley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 8, 1999
Corn is the main dish at Toby's Dinner Theatre, where Rodgers and Hammerstein's "State Fair" is being served with relish. (Goodness, the corn is catching.)This is an extremely good-natured musical in which the only remotely shady figures (a carnival huckster and a comically cynical farmer) are bit players. The real drama -- hold on to your hats -- is whether the Frake family pig will win a blue ribbon at the Iowa State Fair, whether Mrs. Frake's mincemeat will impress the culinary judges and whether the Frake kids (Margy and Wayne)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 2, 1998
Two seasons ago, when Rodgers and Hammerstein's "State Fair" made its Broadway debut, it found itself in the company of two young upstarts, "Rent" and "Bring in 'da Noise, Bring in 'da Funk." A trip to the fair looked gosh-darned old-fashioned by comparison.But even in its prime, back in 1945, as the only musical Rodgers and Hammerstein wrote specifically for the movies, "State Fair" was hardly one of the pair's groundbreaking efforts.The stage version -- adapted by Tom Briggs and Louis Mattioli and augmented with seven other Rodgers and Hammerstein songs -- doesn't mine new veins of gold, it merely polishes the corn that was already there.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 2003
That the musical State Fair gets lost in the Rodgers and Hammerstein canon is hardly a shock, since it is surrounded by the likes of Oklahoma!, Carousel, The King and I, South Pacific and The Sound of Music. But despite being one of the runts of the Rodgers and Hammerstein litter, the musical tale of the Frake family's visit to the Iowa State Fair of 1946 - being presented at the Chesapeake Arts Center in Brooklyn Park in a Merely Players production - is not without its charms. The well-scrubbed, all-American story of blue-ribbon boars, liquor-filled mincemeat and love lost and found on the midway by the two Frake siblings is serviceable enough, and the songs, including "It's a Grand Night for Singing," "It Might As Well Be Spring" and "Isn't It Kinda' Fun" aren't slouchy in the least.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | December 16, 1994
"There's nothing better than a good old-fashioned exercise for your imagination," the Fairy Godmother says at the beginning of Rodgers and Hammerstein's "Cinderella." Director Mark Waldrop has taken that advice to heart in Olney Theatre's delightfully imaginative production.Near the start of the show, Deb G. Girdler, as the Fairy Godmother, inserts a large gold key into a stained-glass box on one side of the stage. When the key starts turning, the rest of the cast jolts into action, like figurines in a music box. But though the actors move like mechanical toys during the overture, there's nothing mechanical about the rest of this charming show.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1999
Is the world ready for a superhero King of Siam?That's what it's getting with this animated "The King and I," a kiddified version of the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical that plays like an above-average Saturday-morning TV show -- faint praise indeed, but that's the audience the film is aiming for."The King and I" is based on the true story of Anna Leonowens (voiced by Miranda Richardson), a 19th-century British schoolteacher hired to instruct the children of the King of Siam (the voice of Martin Vidnovic, who served as understudy to Yul Brynner, the quintessential king)
FEATURES
By Liz Smith and Liz Smith,Tribune Media Services | June 6, 2007
Some people said Paris Hilton looked as if she was going to burst into tears at the MTV Movie Awards, after comic Sarah Silverman made a joke at Paris' expense from the stage. Oh, please, if you're so fragile why spend your last night of freedom -- for 23 days, anyway -- at the MTV Awards? What about staying home with the Bible? We all know how devoted Miss Hilton is to matters of the spirit. I missed most of the MTV awards, except I did see Cameron Diaz, blond again and dazzling, handing Mike Myers his prize.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | August 23, 2001
Totem Pole Playhouse ends its season with Rodgers, Hammerstein Totem Pole Playhouse, the summer theater run by Baltimorean Carl Schurr in Pennsylvania's verdant Caledonia State Park, wraps up its 2001 season this weekend with the final performances of the Rodgers and Hammerstein revue A Grand Night for Singing. The 1993 Broadway show gives audiences a chance to revisit such R&H chestnuts as "Some Enchanted Evening" and "Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin' " as well as to discover some of the pair's lesser-known numbers.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.