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NEWS
November 25, 2013
Giving free garbage containers to city residents is a good idea, but I hope the new cans will be made of titanium, electrified with 15,000 volts and come with padlocked lids and a Doberman ( "Some in city to get trash cans on wheels to fight rats," Nov. 19). Otherwise they won't be rat-proof. The rats in "Gucci Hampden," where I live, have chewed their way through three heavy plastic cans in the past six months. They will always find a way in, so I refuse to buy any more trash cans.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 2, 2013
After researching the county website countyofhowardmd.us/ foodscraps.htm including viewing the "Food scrap pictures from the mini-pilot" located under the Additional Resources sub-heading at the bottom of the page, I am horrified that Howard County is planning to implement the food scrap program in our community. A significant amount of litter is generated on "blue bin" recycling days, due to either residents overflowing their blue bins, and/or the trash collectors losing some of the bin contents when emptying into the truck.
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NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2002
The city is buying 33,000 trash cans - about one for every 10 rats in the city - and giving them to residents in four poor neighborhoods where the rodents are a big problem. The Board of Estimates approved $200,000 yesterday to buy the cans, which Rubbermaid is selling to the city at cost - $6 a can, about a quarter of their retail price. "This is a rat restaurant," Mayor Martin O'Malley said at a morning news conference as he uncovered a rusted metal can coming apart at the seams. "And this is a fortification against rats," he added, showing off one of the new cans: a 32-gallon plastic receptacle with a hinged lid and the Baltimore Believe logo on one side.
NEWS
November 25, 2013
Giving free garbage containers to city residents is a good idea, but I hope the new cans will be made of titanium, electrified with 15,000 volts and come with padlocked lids and a Doberman ( "Some in city to get trash cans on wheels to fight rats," Nov. 19). Otherwise they won't be rat-proof. The rats in "Gucci Hampden," where I live, have chewed their way through three heavy plastic cans in the past six months. They will always find a way in, so I refuse to buy any more trash cans.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 12, 2006
If rodents in Spain are any guide, periodic changes in Earth's orbit might account for the apparent regularity with which new species of mammals emerge and then become extinct, scientists are reporting today. It so happens, the paleontologists say, that variations in the course that Earth travels around the sun and in the tilt of its axis are associated with episodes of global cooling. Their new research on the fossil record shows the cyclical pattern of these phenomena corresponds to species turnover in rodents and probably other mammal groups as well.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1998
Some have suspected for years that a few rats live inside Towson's twin courthouses, but they're wrong. The big, nasty rodents live outside the courthouse complex in the heart of Towson, burrowing holes in the Washington Avenue garden near the older building and scurrying beneath bushes around the newer building and the fountain plaza between. Several dead rats have been discovered in the brick gutters that surround the garden. People also have seen them run into holes in the lawn.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Erika Niedowski and Matthew Dolan and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2005
A leading supplier of laboratory mice and rats will pay the federal government $7.2 million after the Indiana-based company admitted providing genetically defective rodents to the nation's top research institution and submitting false information that hid the problem. The settlement announced yesterday by the U.S. attorney's office in Maryland marks at least the third time in the past decade that Harlan, Sprague, Dawley Inc. of Indianapolis has had to pay costs or damages for research compromised by genetic deficiencies in its widely used rats and mice.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2002
Amid the high-profile overhaul of its human research program last year after the death of a volunteer, the Johns Hopkins University has embarked on a quieter effort to fix problems in how it cares for laboratory animals. The effort comes after federal and private animal welfare inspectors discovered deficiencies in recent years - from the way the university keeps medical records and oversees experiments to how it houses its ballooning animal population. In about a dozen cases, inspectors found that animals were given inadequate pain medication after experimental procedures and may have suffered unnecessarily, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture records.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2005
The warm temperatures this week have revealed yet another unpleasant aspect of jury duty in Baltimore City: The 105-year- old Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse smells like dead rats. As if the tedium, uncomfortable chairs, dingy bathrooms and hallways filled with shackled prisoners weren't enough. A strong odor of decaying rodents (or something equally foul) is permeating some of the courtrooms, hallways and jury rooms on the building's second and third floors, prompting one judge to apologize for the, "shall we say, environmental factors" of jury duty.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1999
Dr. Rat, the khaki-clad, crusading superhero who delighted schoolchildren and became one of Baltimore's more mysterious cult figures, is expected to appear in public tonight for the first time in 17 years during an anti-rodent rally in front of City Hall.Between 1980 and 1982, the enigmatic Dr. Rat, whose academic credentials have long been shrouded in secrecy, visited every elementary school in the city.Accompanied by actors and musicians, he sang self-composed tunes such as "Pestilence" and enlisted youngsters for the city's crusade to keep the local rat population under control.
NEWS
March 2, 2013
George Fenwick's article on cats as an invasive species ("House cats: The destructive invasive species purring on your lap" Feb. 26) was filled with misinformation. It is easy to blame cats for environmental degradation; it is far more difficult to place the blame where it belongs. While cats kill birds, the threat they pose is in no way equal to the threat posed by human-caused habitat loss, climate change, or pollution. These are the threats to wildlife that we should be worrying about today.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2011
Name: Buddy Owner: The Coury family How They Met: He jumped out from under some bushes in an alley on a cold, rainy day in January to greet our yellow lab Chelsea. Age: We think he's about 7 Home: Towson Breed: Corgi, Terrier, and a few others we're not sure of Best Trick: Buddy can tear into a plastic trash bag and grab a snack faster than the speed of light Favorite Activity: Patrolling the yard for errant rodents Favorite Food: A discarded chicken bone on the side of the road Cutest Moment: Burying his bone in the garden, guarding it and then digging it up if he sees you looking at him. If Buddy Had a Motto For Life, It Would Be: Boy, I sure know how to pick 'em!
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2011
Rats are brazen neighbors in many a Baltimore neighborhood. A city police officer discovered just how brazen they are when one furry scavenger turned criminal and broke into a squad car. The rodent apparently gnawed on some wires and waited. It chose a less-than-perfect moment to emerge from hiding early Wednesday and climb up the back of a sergeant as his partner drove to a robbery call in South Baltimore. Thinking his colleague was playing a joke by tickling his neck, Sgt. Marc J. Camarote took a swipe with his arm. The angry rodent bit the officer on the palm and thumb of his right hand, according to a police spokesman.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2011
At community cleanups this year, eighth-grade students from Dundalk Middle School heard a lot of complaints about rats — rodents roaming alleys, gnawing on plastic trash cans and digging deep holes in yards. Students in Patricia Knight's environmental science classes figured they could do something about it, by gathering data and ultimately launching their own eradication efforts. Soon after the cleanups, Knight asked her eighth-graders how many had recently spotted a rat in their neighborhood.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller | nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | March 21, 2010
In the wake of a federal immigration raid at a Hanover restaurant this month, Anne Arundel County officials targeted several homes near the business where they say illegal workers were living and discovered numerous violations. The county Health Department, along with the permitting and inspections office, found 20 violations at three homes, including unsafe structures and junk and debris. "Employers must be held accountable for violating federal immigration laws, as well as the negative impact they have on the community for forcing their workers to live in deplorable conditions," said Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold, who ordered the inspections.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | November 8, 2009
They're not as fearsome as a white whale on the high seas, or as portentous as a white buffalo calf on the Great Plains. But a handful of white squirrels is causing a stir in Maryland. Two of the critters have been spotted scampering about between the historic Holly Hall Mansion and the Big Elk Mall in Elkton, chasing nuts and making headlines in the local newspaper. "We all feed them, and they just kind of enjoy themselves, frolicking around in a little yard," said Elkton native Deborah L. Duff, who first noticed the young pair in September.
NEWS
September 2, 2007
THE ISSUE: -- A former Howard County health inspector says the county has been too lenient with food outlets that have chronic cleanliness problems. Officials deny that but agree that more aggressive action might be needed against some chronic offenders. Do you think the county Health Department does enough to protect the public from insects, rodents and food-handling problems in supermarkets and restaurants? There is room for improvement To an extent, yes, I think the county Health Department is doing enough to protect the public from insects, rodents, and food-handling problems (aka sanitation concerns)
NEWS
February 28, 2001
Do you know? Can porcupines throw their sharp quills? Answer: No, but if you touch one, it will hurt. Learn more! Visit the African porcupines at the Baltimore Zoo. Read "A Porcupine Named Fluffy" by Helen Lester. 1. The milky eagle owl is one of only a few birds in Africa that can successfully hunt porcupines. 2. Porcupines are related to rodents, guinea pigs and chinchillas.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | August 1, 2008
Maybe Sheila Dixon's "Cleaner, Greener" thing is working a little too well. In need of a rodent for that municipal ad campaign, Baltimore sent away to New York for a freeze-dried rat. A cash-strapped city that only a decade ago had more rats than people, that had a fit when the last mayor plucked police chiefs from the Big Apple, blew $200 on a single Yankee vermin. Just what Baltimore needs: another fur scandal.
BUSINESS
By Alan J. Heavens and Alan J. Heavens,McClatchy-Tribune | December 16, 2007
It's getting colder outside, and no one knows better than the neighborhood rodents. They find it much more comfy to live in your floors, walls, kitchen drawers, name it, so it's time to come up with an eradication strategy. Here's some advice, provided with help from the folks at Terminix. KNOW YOUR ENEMY -- Cooler temperatures limit rodents' natural sources of food and shelter. But they can enter houses through tiny openings and are capable of scaling rough surfaces and even tightroping wires to gain access to entry points.
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