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By Beth Kephart and By Beth Kephart,Special to the Sun | September 12, 1999
"A Star Called Henry," by Roddy Doyle. Viking. 344 pages. $23.95.Some books sweep you into the embrace of their arms and do not let you go. Roddy Doyle's sixth novel, "A Star Called Henry," is of that breed -- compelling, original, devastating, funny, a masterwork, an instant classic. It's as if Doyle has reinvented language and the way a story gets told. As if the author himself had been born into nothing in Dublin at the turn of the century and is telling all, for our ears only, with a manic generosity.
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NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | February 20, 2009
The Oscar Nominated Short Films program opens today at the Charles Theatre, just in time to satisfy lovers of the form as well as Academy Award fans hoping to complete their ballot before Sunday's ceremony. It's full of surprises. Although animated shorts have garnered more attention than live-action shorts in recent years - they're often calling cards for the lucrative world of animated features - the dramatic slates are equally varied, enjoyable and invigorating. Here's a quick rundown: * Steph Green's New Boy (Ireland)
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NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,special to the sun | April 14, 1996
"The Woman Who Walked Into Doors," by Roddy Doyle. Viking Penguin. 226 pages. $22.95. Irish novelist Roddy Doyle has written another gorgeous novel. "The Woman Who Walked Into Doors" is both powerful fiction and a dirge, a lament as devastating as his Booker Prize-winning "Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha" with its horrifying revelation of the full title: "Paddy Clarke - Has no da. Ha ha ha!" Paddy's dad abandons the family and Paula, Mr. Doyle's new heroine, is beaten senseless for 17 years by Charlo, her brutal husband, before this novel's own startling conclusion.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Kephart and By Beth Kephart,Special to the Sun | October 27, 2002
Rory & Ita, by Roddy Doyle. Viking. 352 pages. $23.95. From the promotional material supporting Roddy Doyle's newest book, one learns that this author of six exhilarating novels and two plays is, in the words of his publicist, "currently working on a follow-up novel to A Star Called Henry, a volume collecting various stories, published and unpublished, and some books for children." Normally that wouldn't matter much -- an author's hyper-productivity should be nothing but his own business -- but in the case of Rory & Ita, I couldn't get the coming lineup out of my head.
FEATURES
By David Mehegan and David Mehegan,Boston Globe | February 8, 1994
One noticeable thing about the younger Irish writers: They tend to talk about their own writing in a refreshingly unpretentious way. No high-flown critical talk; you'd think they were meticulous carpenters describing their craft.It's that way to be sure with Roddy Doyle, bespectacled 35-year-old author of "The Commitments," "The Snapper," "The Van" and now the prize-winning "Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha," the tale of a child in agony about his quarreling parents. (The film version of "The Snapper" opens in Baltimore Friday.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1996
Roddy Doyle first thought his new book might be called "Charlo," after the abusive man at its center. No, the book really belonged to his victim and wife. Try "Paula.""But that's a pretty crummy title," the Irish writer acknowledges now. So he began thinking about the litany of excuses urged on abused women. You fell down the stairs. You tripped over the curb. You walked into a door.There it was.Paula Spencer, a 39-year-old alcoholic trying to sort out the memories of her abusive marriage, became "The Woman Who Walked Into Doors" (Viking, $22.95)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Kephart and By Beth Kephart,Special to the Sun | October 27, 2002
Rory & Ita, by Roddy Doyle. Viking. 352 pages. $23.95. From the promotional material supporting Roddy Doyle's newest book, one learns that this author of six exhilarating novels and two plays is, in the words of his publicist, "currently working on a follow-up novel to A Star Called Henry, a volume collecting various stories, published and unpublished, and some books for children." Normally that wouldn't matter much -- an author's hyper-productivity should be nothing but his own business -- but in the case of Rory & Ita, I couldn't get the coming lineup out of my head.
NEWS
By Colin McEnroe and Colin McEnroe,Hartford Courant | January 30, 1994
Title: "Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha"Author: Roddy DoylePublisher: VikingLength, price: 282 pages, $20.95 First, a tip of the completely biased hat to Irish writers. Man for man, novels for novels, plays for plays, as Flann O'Brien would say, what nationality of scriveners can match them for innovation?Who can explain it; who can tell you why? They don't follow the rules or they don't know them or they forget them. They make up new ones.Roddy Doyle makes up new rules, even as regards the publication of books.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | February 18, 1994
Sometimes small is really big.That's the case with "The Snapper," the thoroughly delightful comedy set so blissfully in the quotidian that it seems not to acknowledge a neighborhood beyond the next block.It's small in a majestic way. It is, in fact, the biggest small movie you ever saw.So settled and homey, in fact, is "The Snapper" that it's truly mind-blowing to contemplate that its director is one of the most cosmopolitan and accomplished of filmmakers, the very same Britisher Stephen Frears who has so dazzlingly slid through movie cultures.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | February 20, 2009
The Oscar Nominated Short Films program opens today at the Charles Theatre, just in time to satisfy lovers of the form as well as Academy Award fans hoping to complete their ballot before Sunday's ceremony. It's full of surprises. Although animated shorts have garnered more attention than live-action shorts in recent years - they're often calling cards for the lucrative world of animated features - the dramatic slates are equally varied, enjoyable and invigorating. Here's a quick rundown: * Steph Green's New Boy (Ireland)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | June 3, 2001
I long have been a big fan of Amnesty International, one of a tiny handful of organizations of ostensible good will that in my experience has never succumbed to empire building or blathering political foolishness. Now 40 years old, it gets on with the job of trying to save people from abuse by wielders of awful powers. As a fund-raising exercise for Amnesty, now comes "Yeats Is Dead! -- A Mystery" by 15 Irish writers, edited by Joseph O'Connor (Knopf, 259 pages, $23). The idea is not exactly fresh.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Kephart and By Beth Kephart,Special to the Sun | September 12, 1999
"A Star Called Henry," by Roddy Doyle. Viking. 344 pages. $23.95.Some books sweep you into the embrace of their arms and do not let you go. Roddy Doyle's sixth novel, "A Star Called Henry," is of that breed -- compelling, original, devastating, funny, a masterwork, an instant classic. It's as if Doyle has reinvented language and the way a story gets told. As if the author himself had been born into nothing in Dublin at the turn of the century and is telling all, for our ears only, with a manic generosity.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1996
Roddy Doyle first thought his new book might be called "Charlo," after the abusive man at its center. No, the book really belonged to his victim and wife. Try "Paula.""But that's a pretty crummy title," the Irish writer acknowledges now. So he began thinking about the litany of excuses urged on abused women. You fell down the stairs. You tripped over the curb. You walked into a door.There it was.Paula Spencer, a 39-year-old alcoholic trying to sort out the memories of her abusive marriage, became "The Woman Who Walked Into Doors" (Viking, $22.95)
NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,special to the sun | April 14, 1996
"The Woman Who Walked Into Doors," by Roddy Doyle. Viking Penguin. 226 pages. $22.95. Irish novelist Roddy Doyle has written another gorgeous novel. "The Woman Who Walked Into Doors" is both powerful fiction and a dirge, a lament as devastating as his Booker Prize-winning "Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha" with its horrifying revelation of the full title: "Paddy Clarke - Has no da. Ha ha ha!" Paddy's dad abandons the family and Paula, Mr. Doyle's new heroine, is beaten senseless for 17 years by Charlo, her brutal husband, before this novel's own startling conclusion.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | February 18, 1994
Sometimes small is really big.That's the case with "The Snapper," the thoroughly delightful comedy set so blissfully in the quotidian that it seems not to acknowledge a neighborhood beyond the next block.It's small in a majestic way. It is, in fact, the biggest small movie you ever saw.So settled and homey, in fact, is "The Snapper" that it's truly mind-blowing to contemplate that its director is one of the most cosmopolitan and accomplished of filmmakers, the very same Britisher Stephen Frears who has so dazzlingly slid through movie cultures.
FEATURES
By David Mehegan and David Mehegan,Boston Globe | February 8, 1994
One noticeable thing about the younger Irish writers: They tend to talk about their own writing in a refreshingly unpretentious way. No high-flown critical talk; you'd think they were meticulous carpenters describing their craft.It's that way to be sure with Roddy Doyle, bespectacled 35-year-old author of "The Commitments," "The Snapper," "The Van" and now the prize-winning "Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha," the tale of a child in agony about his quarreling parents. (The film version of "The Snapper" opens in Baltimore Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | June 3, 2001
I long have been a big fan of Amnesty International, one of a tiny handful of organizations of ostensible good will that in my experience has never succumbed to empire building or blathering political foolishness. Now 40 years old, it gets on with the job of trying to save people from abuse by wielders of awful powers. As a fund-raising exercise for Amnesty, now comes "Yeats Is Dead! -- A Mystery" by 15 Irish writers, edited by Joseph O'Connor (Knopf, 259 pages, $23). The idea is not exactly fresh.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | August 1, 1997
"The Van," the third and final installment of Roddy Doyle's Barrytown trilogy, lacks the Dublin soul of "The Commitments" and the crackle of "The Snapper." Yet this engaging film brings comic meaning to the term "labor pains."It assumes that the only thing worse than not having a job is getting one that puts you in constant contact with your best friend.Colm Meaney appears here as Larry, the chronically unemployed slacker whose son has to lend him beer money. When Larry's best friend Bimbo (the gravely funny Donal O'Kelly)
NEWS
By Colin McEnroe and Colin McEnroe,Hartford Courant | January 30, 1994
Title: "Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha"Author: Roddy DoylePublisher: VikingLength, price: 282 pages, $20.95 First, a tip of the completely biased hat to Irish writers. Man for man, novels for novels, plays for plays, as Flann O'Brien would say, what nationality of scriveners can match them for innovation?Who can explain it; who can tell you why? They don't follow the rules or they don't know them or they forget them. They make up new ones.Roddy Doyle makes up new rules, even as regards the publication of books.
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