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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2012
Donna Hamilton will be joining Rod Daniels at the 11 p.m. anchor desk at WBAL-TV  (Channel 11) starting Super Bowl night, General Manager Dan Joerres confirmed Wednesday. Daniels has been anchoring the flagship broadcast solo since July when WBAL decided not to renew the contract of Marianne Banister. Banister had been co-anchoring since 1995 when she arrived at WBAL from station KABC, the ABC owned station in Los Angeles where she anchored early morning and 6 p.m. newscasts in the nation's second largest TV market.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
WBAL-TV is bringing in a new anchorman next month, and that will mean change in one of the most stable weekday news lineups in the country. Jason Newton, a Baltimore native and 36-year-old anchorman at WISN-TV in Milwaukee, will join WBAL next week and take on anchoring duties alongside Mindy Basara at 5 a.m., 6 a.m. and 7 a.m. weekdays starting Dec. 16. His arrival will result in Stan Stovall leaving mornings, where he has co-anchored the...
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FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | October 5, 1992
Rod Daniels is going to have a new partner on the anchor desk starting next month.WBAL (Channel 11) said it has hired Carol Costello, a 31-year-old TV newswoman from Columbus, Ohio, to co-anchor its weeknight 6 p.m. and 11 p.m. newscasts.Channel 11 News Director David Roberts declined to discuss specifics of Costello's contract, except to say, "It's a long-term deal just as Rod Daniels has a long-term deal."Industry estimates of the going rate for a new first-string anchorwoman in a market the size of Baltimore range between $160,000 and $225,000 a year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2012
Local TV news ratings in Baltimore are rarely news. The market has been dominated for a long time by a back-and-forth battle between WJZ and WBAL. Since the mid-1990s, most years ended in some version of a split decision, with both stations claiming victory. It was all mind-numbingly predictable. Then, last week, came a set of Nielsen numbers for January showing WJZ (Channel 13) scoring a clean sweep over WBAL (Channel 11) - winning every competitive news time period. That defines dominance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2012
Local TV news ratings in Baltimore are rarely news. The market has been dominated for a long time by a back-and-forth battle between WJZ and WBAL. Since the mid-1990s, most years ended in some version of a split decision, with both stations claiming victory. It was all mind-numbingly predictable. Then, last week, came a set of Nielsen numbers for January showing WJZ (Channel 13) scoring a clean sweep over WBAL (Channel 11) - winning every competitive news time period. That defines dominance.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2003
The first in an occasional series about the fitness habits of Marylanders. It's a bird. It's a plane. No, it's Rod Daniels taking a curve on his bicycle at breakneck pace. Breathing in fresh air, pumping blood into his system, discovering a new vista: It's all part of WBAL news anchor Rod Daniels' daily workout routine. "I'm bicycle crazy," says Daniels, 51, who has a stable of ultra-light, high-tech bikes, including a couple always available for friends along for the ride. His most prized bike is a Trek with a carbon-fiber frame, on which he can average 18 to 20 miles per hour after a season's worth of riding.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2012
WJZ -TV enjoyed one of its most successful ratings books ever in January winning all competitive weekday news time periods with viewers 25 to 54 years of age, the demographic on which most TV news ad sales are made. WJZ also won in total viewers in those time periods. The CBS-owned station was Baltimore's leader at 5 and 6 a.m. in the locally-produced newscasts that precede network morning shows. WJZ was also number one at noon, 5, 6 and 11 p.m. The last time that happened was in 2008, when WBAL, WJZ's long-time rival, topped all newscasts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
WBAL-TV is bringing in a new anchorman next month, and that will mean change in one of the most stable weekday news lineups in the country. Jason Newton, a Baltimore native and 36-year-old anchorman at WISN-TV in Milwaukee, will join WBAL next week and take on anchoring duties alongside Mindy Basara at 5 a.m., 6 a.m. and 7 a.m. weekdays starting Dec. 16. His arrival will result in Stan Stovall leaving mornings, where he has co-anchored the...
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | July 30, 1995
Jan Pottker, author of "Born to Power: Heirs to America's Leading Companies" and the best-selling "Dear Ann, Dear Abby: An Unauthorized Biography of Ann Landers and Abigail Van Buren," has struck again. This time she's written a book about the multibillion-dollar Mars family empire."Crisis in Candyland" recounts some amazing stories about members of the family who run the fifth largest private company in the United States. Mars Inc. makes M&Ms, Snickers, Three Musketeers, Milky Ways and an array of other products.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2011
Marianne Banister's farewell from Baltimore television after more than 15 years of co-anchoring the 6 and 11 p.m. news at WBAL-TV was an unusually modest and subdued one. Unlike the farewells for Sally Thorner at WJZ and Mary Beth Marsden at WMAR in December of 2009, there were no video montages of Banister's career at WBAL. There were no extended farewells or family members and colleagues coming onto the set to say goodbye. Banister's final words to Baltimore viewers at the end of the 11 p.m. newscast lasted 35 seconds, and only 17 seconds were actual words of farewell.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2012
WJZ -TV enjoyed one of its most successful ratings books ever in January winning all competitive weekday news time periods with viewers 25 to 54 years of age, the demographic on which most TV news ad sales are made. WJZ also won in total viewers in those time periods. The CBS-owned station was Baltimore's leader at 5 and 6 a.m. in the locally-produced newscasts that precede network morning shows. WJZ was also number one at noon, 5, 6 and 11 p.m. The last time that happened was in 2008, when WBAL, WJZ's long-time rival, topped all newscasts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2012
Donna Hamilton will be joining Rod Daniels at the 11 p.m. anchor desk at WBAL-TV  (Channel 11) starting Super Bowl night, General Manager Dan Joerres confirmed Wednesday. Daniels has been anchoring the flagship broadcast solo since July when WBAL decided not to renew the contract of Marianne Banister. Banister had been co-anchoring since 1995 when she arrived at WBAL from station KABC, the ABC owned station in Los Angeles where she anchored early morning and 6 p.m. newscasts in the nation's second largest TV market.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2011
Marianne Banister's farewell from Baltimore television after more than 15 years of co-anchoring the 6 and 11 p.m. news at WBAL-TV was an unusually modest and subdued one. Unlike the farewells for Sally Thorner at WJZ and Mary Beth Marsden at WMAR in December of 2009, there were no video montages of Banister's career at WBAL. There were no extended farewells or family members and colleagues coming onto the set to say goodbye. Banister's final words to Baltimore viewers at the end of the 11 p.m. newscast lasted 35 seconds, and only 17 seconds were actual words of farewell.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2011
Marianne Banister, one-half of the longest running anchor team in Baltimore television, is leaving WBAL-TV after more than 15 years as co-anchor of the 6 and 11 p.m. newscasts at the top-ranked station. Her last day at the station will be Wednesday, WBAL General Manager Dan Joerres said. She will say "goodbye" to viewers at the ends of the 6 and 11 p.m newscasts, he added. Banister came to WBAL in 1995 from station KABC, the ABC owned station in Los Angeles where she anchored early morning and 6 p.m. newscasts in the nation's second largest TV market.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2003
The first in an occasional series about the fitness habits of Marylanders. It's a bird. It's a plane. No, it's Rod Daniels taking a curve on his bicycle at breakneck pace. Breathing in fresh air, pumping blood into his system, discovering a new vista: It's all part of WBAL news anchor Rod Daniels' daily workout routine. "I'm bicycle crazy," says Daniels, 51, who has a stable of ultra-light, high-tech bikes, including a couple always available for friends along for the ride. His most prized bike is a Trek with a carbon-fiber frame, on which he can average 18 to 20 miles per hour after a season's worth of riding.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1996
Dribs and drabs from the notebookFor Gregory Paul Andorfer, apparently it's not enough to win all sorts of Peabody and Emmy awards and to help put "Cosmos" on the air. At least, it's not enough to persuade him to stay in television.Andorfer, a former bigwig at WQED in Pittsburgh, one of the country's leading PBS stations, took over as executive director of the Maryland Science Center in Baltimore last month.Andorfer replaces Paul Hanle, who left the center in December.If the center was looking for someone versed in making science accessible to the masses, they seem to have looked in the right place.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 19, 1995
The Dead Eye is alive again. A Baltimore Circuit Court judge gave the popular dockside saloon its liquor license back -- pending an appeal of the Liquor Board's decision to revoke it. Capt. Dan Davis lost his barkeep badge last week -- to the chagrin of a few thousand rockers, boozers and boaters -- because he had been serving drinks on the Dead Eye's deck without approval. Davis and the city, unhappily bonded through lease agreements, have been bickering for years over rent, taxes and profits from the Baltimore Yacht Basin marina and the Dead Eye, both located under the Hanover Street bridge.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1996
Dribs and drabs from the notebookFor Gregory Paul Andorfer, apparently it's not enough to win all sorts of Peabody and Emmy awards and to help put "Cosmos" on the air. At least, it's not enough to persuade him to stay in television.Andorfer, a former bigwig at WQED in Pittsburgh, one of the country's leading PBS stations, took over as executive director of the Maryland Science Center in Baltimore last month.Andorfer replaces Paul Hanle, who left the center in December.If the center was looking for someone versed in making science accessible to the masses, they seem to have looked in the right place.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | July 30, 1995
Jan Pottker, author of "Born to Power: Heirs to America's Leading Companies" and the best-selling "Dear Ann, Dear Abby: An Unauthorized Biography of Ann Landers and Abigail Van Buren," has struck again. This time she's written a book about the multibillion-dollar Mars family empire."Crisis in Candyland" recounts some amazing stories about members of the family who run the fifth largest private company in the United States. Mars Inc. makes M&Ms, Snickers, Three Musketeers, Milky Ways and an array of other products.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 19, 1995
The Dead Eye is alive again. A Baltimore Circuit Court judge gave the popular dockside saloon its liquor license back -- pending an appeal of the Liquor Board's decision to revoke it. Capt. Dan Davis lost his barkeep badge last week -- to the chagrin of a few thousand rockers, boozers and boaters -- because he had been serving drinks on the Dead Eye's deck without approval. Davis and the city, unhappily bonded through lease agreements, have been bickering for years over rent, taxes and profits from the Baltimore Yacht Basin marina and the Dead Eye, both located under the Hanover Street bridge.
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