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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2001
It's been said that John Steadman, the legendary Baltimore sports columnist who died this week, was one of the rubber chicken circuit's most devoted and beloved participants whose appearances before various groups probably equaled that of Brooks Robinson. It was a point of pride that if a veterans or church group, nursing home seniors, sports fans or students requested an appearance, Steadman showed up. There was never any talk of a speaker's fee, either. It's also been said that he's probably seen more church basements, auditoriums, nursing homes, retirement communities and schools than an insurance inspector.
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NEWS
February 1, 2008
ROBERT M. BALL, 93 Social security commissioner Robert M. Ball, a former Social Security commissioner considered by many as its chief defender and the father of Medicare, has died. Mr. Ball's death Tuesday was announced by the National Academy of Social Insurance in Washington, which he founded in 1986. No cause was given. Mr. Ball first worked as a Social Security field assistant in New Jersey in 1939. Appointed commissioner of Social Security by President John F. Kennedy in 1962, he stayed on as commissioner until his retirement in 1973.
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NEWS
February 1, 2008
ROBERT M. BALL, 93 Social security commissioner Robert M. Ball, a former Social Security commissioner considered by many as its chief defender and the father of Medicare, has died. Mr. Ball's death Tuesday was announced by the National Academy of Social Insurance in Washington, which he founded in 1986. No cause was given. Mr. Ball first worked as a Social Security field assistant in New Jersey in 1939. Appointed commissioner of Social Security by President John F. Kennedy in 1962, he stayed on as commissioner until his retirement in 1973.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 6, 2004
As an actor, Ronald Reagan never worked for the director he often quoted when he was president: Frank Capra, whose philosophy of action-packed charity in Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936) reflected, in Reagan's mind, his administration's economic policies. But Reagan's own big-screen presence as a genial, unpretentious and capable guy - a presence he transferred with more seasoned authority to the small screen as the host (and occasional star) of TV's General Electric Theatre and Death Valley Days - fit the image he wanted people to have of his kind of America.
SPORTS
January 8, 1990
According to the New York Daily News, Jim Valvano, who exited N.C. State under fire, and now does double-duty with ABC and ESPN, is already getting antsy and will leave TV if he connects with a college or NBA gig.Valvano admits he already misses running his own team. "The high of broadcasting a good game is not the same as winning when you are coaching," Valvano said. "I miss the locker room. I do the same preparation [for TV] as I did as a coach but now it's not my team."I miss giving the Knute Rockne pep talk, I miss getting those pre-game nerves and I really miss the one-on-one; you know, my team against your team.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2002
Tim Cooke has gazed upon the Golden Dome, knelt at Knute Rockne's grave and pulled a bit of grass from the hallowed field where Montana, Hornung and Lujack played. He has flown Notre Dame banners from the third-floor apartment he once rented in Fells Point. Now a resident of Massachusetts, Cooke boldly wears his Notre Dame sweatshirt to Boston College football games, especially when they're home to the Fighting Irish. Yet Cooke is not a graduate of Notre Dame. He attended Towson University, and earned a master's degree from Boston College.
NEWS
April 8, 1996
William T. Dawson,69, a real estate developer and former banker and teen actor, died of cancer April 1 in Los Angeles. Mr. Dawson founded the Dawson Development Co. of Seal Beach in 1969 and launched a $100 million development of condominiums, a shopping center and docks at Long Beach Marina. In the 1940s, he had roles in "Knute Rockne -- All American," "Remember the Day," "A Dispatch from Reuters," "The Major and the Minor" and "Lady in the Dark."William G. Schofield,86, founder of the Freedom Trail and a retired newspaper editor, died April 1 in Boston.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 6, 2004
As an actor, Ronald Reagan never worked for the director he often quoted when he was president: Frank Capra, whose philosophy of action-packed charity in Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936) reflected, in Reagan's mind, his administration's economic policies. But Reagan's own big-screen presence as a genial, unpretentious and capable guy - a presence he transferred with more seasoned authority to the small screen as the host (and occasional star) of TV's General Electric Theatre and Death Valley Days - fit the image he wanted people to have of his kind of America.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | June 8, 1997
Neil M. Shpritz, called the Knute Rockne of BWI development, slapped someone on the back, shook another's hand, reared his big body back, shot someone else a hello.Shpritz was in his element. About 1,000 people were at the Baltimore Convention Center for the "America Growing Smarter" summit. People milled around the hallways, waiting for the first speaker to begin.And Shpritz, a shy boy who developed into a talkative man, did what he does best, schmoozed and promoted the 80-square-mile BWI business district that includes 2,500 businesses and 150,000 employees around burgeoning Baltimore-Washington International Airport.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | March 14, 1994
A friend of Roland E. Slaysman says Baltimore's dean of locksmithing would be a millionaire if he charged his clients by the hour.The 77-year-old mechanical specialist walks into his back yard workshop and a few days later emerges with a perfectly functioning replica 1770 door lock for some stately mansion. He does take time off to eat and sleep, but he doesn't sit still much.Slaysman is the man that experts call on for advice on restoring or making the locks for some of Maryland's architectural treasures -- such places as the Paca and Carroll houses in Annapolis, the B&O Railroad Station in Ellicott City (oldest in the nation)
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2002
Tim Cooke has gazed upon the Golden Dome, knelt at Knute Rockne's grave and pulled a bit of grass from the hallowed field where Montana, Hornung and Lujack played. He has flown Notre Dame banners from the third-floor apartment he once rented in Fells Point. Now a resident of Massachusetts, Cooke boldly wears his Notre Dame sweatshirt to Boston College football games, especially when they're home to the Fighting Irish. Yet Cooke is not a graduate of Notre Dame. He attended Towson University, and earned a master's degree from Boston College.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2001
It's been said that John Steadman, the legendary Baltimore sports columnist who died this week, was one of the rubber chicken circuit's most devoted and beloved participants whose appearances before various groups probably equaled that of Brooks Robinson. It was a point of pride that if a veterans or church group, nursing home seniors, sports fans or students requested an appearance, Steadman showed up. There was never any talk of a speaker's fee, either. It's also been said that he's probably seen more church basements, auditoriums, nursing homes, retirement communities and schools than an insurance inspector.
SPORTS
By Andy Knobel and Andy Knobel,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2000
Notre Dame Stadium usher Victor Couch, 86, gives new meaning to "longtime employee." Couch was first hired by Knute Rockne at the age of 12 to be an usher at football games in 1926 at Cartier Field. Yes, Knute Rockne. When Notre Dame Stadium was built in 1930, the powers-that-be determined that Couch was not old enough. He was put on the wait list. For 11 years. Finally, in 1941, Couch was hired as a stadium usher. He has been on staff since then and has more than made up for lost time.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | June 15, 1997
Baltimore's chances of regaining the Colts nickname and horseshoes seem to be fading.Indianapolis is making a bid to keep the Colts, and owner Jim Irsay doesn't seem keen on moving.Last week, the Indianapolis City Council voted for a 1 percent increase in the auto rental tax to fund renovations at the RCA Dome.At a June 17 meeting, it is expected the city will make more concessions.For example, the Capital Improvements Board, which oversees the dome's operation, took in $8 million last year, and the Colts got only $700,000.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | June 8, 1997
Neil M. Shpritz, called the Knute Rockne of BWI development, slapped someone on the back, shook another's hand, reared his big body back, shot someone else a hello.Shpritz was in his element. About 1,000 people were at the Baltimore Convention Center for the "America Growing Smarter" summit. People milled around the hallways, waiting for the first speaker to begin.And Shpritz, a shy boy who developed into a talkative man, did what he does best, schmoozed and promoted the 80-square-mile BWI business district that includes 2,500 businesses and 150,000 employees around burgeoning Baltimore-Washington International Airport.
NEWS
April 8, 1996
William T. Dawson,69, a real estate developer and former banker and teen actor, died of cancer April 1 in Los Angeles. Mr. Dawson founded the Dawson Development Co. of Seal Beach in 1969 and launched a $100 million development of condominiums, a shopping center and docks at Long Beach Marina. In the 1940s, he had roles in "Knute Rockne -- All American," "Remember the Day," "A Dispatch from Reuters," "The Major and the Minor" and "Lady in the Dark."William G. Schofield,86, founder of the Freedom Trail and a retired newspaper editor, died April 1 in Boston.
NEWS
By FRANK DeFORD | February 6, 1995
Sports are reaching that point of maturity when we will now regularly be celebrating centennials. This year, for example, brings us the 100th anniversary of the U.S. Open Golf. Next year in Atlanta will mark the Olympic centennial.Right now, we are marking an even more special personal date. Today is the 100th anniversary of the birth of the single most significant athlete in American history. And perhaps, too, if there is anything to the stars and the planets, baseball, at this dark moment, might draw strength from the fact that it is Babe Ruth's centennial.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | June 15, 1997
Baltimore's chances of regaining the Colts nickname and horseshoes seem to be fading.Indianapolis is making a bid to keep the Colts, and owner Jim Irsay doesn't seem keen on moving.Last week, the Indianapolis City Council voted for a 1 percent increase in the auto rental tax to fund renovations at the RCA Dome.At a June 17 meeting, it is expected the city will make more concessions.For example, the Capital Improvements Board, which oversees the dome's operation, took in $8 million last year, and the Colts got only $700,000.
NEWS
By FRANK DeFORD | February 6, 1995
Sports are reaching that point of maturity when we will now regularly be celebrating centennials. This year, for example, brings us the 100th anniversary of the U.S. Open Golf. Next year in Atlanta will mark the Olympic centennial.Right now, we are marking an even more special personal date. Today is the 100th anniversary of the birth of the single most significant athlete in American history. And perhaps, too, if there is anything to the stars and the planets, baseball, at this dark moment, might draw strength from the fact that it is Babe Ruth's centennial.
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