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BUSINESS
April 18, 1996
MedImmune Inc., a Gaithersburg-based biotechnology company, said yesterday that it has agreed to collaborate with Rockefeller University to develop a vaccine to prevent or treat illnesses caused by a virulent bacteria, Streptococcus pneumoniae.MedImmune also struck a licensing deal with the New York school for the rights to commercialize any vaccines developed from the collaboration. The two did not disclose financial details of the agreement.The bacteria MedImmune and Rockefeller have targeted is the leading cause of blood stream infections, pneumonia and ear infections in children, and the third leading cause of meningitis.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
Many people have heard of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg or Google co-founder Sergey Brin. But few know about Bert Vogelstein, a Johns Hopkins scientist who helped map the cancer genome and created gene and stool tests to detect colon cancer. A new, international award, similar to the Nobel Prize, but with a bigger payout of $3 million, aims to change that. On Wednesday, Zuckerberg and Brin joined Russian entrepreneur and venture capitalist Yuri Milner and Anne Wojcicki, founder of genetic testing company 23andMe, to launch the Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 27, 1994
NEW YORK -- Over the years, scientists at Rockefeller University -- one of the world's pre-eminent research institutions -- have identified DNA, found the first cancer virus, grown the malaria parasite and wrestled with some of biology's most complex problems.Now, they are trying to solve their most terrifying mystery: Who may be trying to kill them?Police disclosed yesterday that someone at the research campus bordering the East River in Manhattan put poison in coffee and tea, deliberately left gas jets on in a molecular biology laboratory, set a fire and sent threatening letters to two eminent female scientists.
NEWS
May 23, 2003
C.A. Tripp, 83, the author of a widely read book that sought to dispel popular misconceptions about homosexuality, died of cancer Saturday in Nyack, N.Y. His book, The Homosexual Matrix, a scholarly work published by McGraw-Hill in 1975, set forth new ideas about sexual attraction and sold nearly 500,000 copies. Author and AIDS activist Larry Kramer said in an interview with The New York Times that the book was the first from a "reputable source" that "dared to speak openly of homosexuality as a healthy occurrence."
NEWS
August 20, 2002
Patricia C. Berlin, a retired interior decorator and artist, died of respiratory failure Friday at Edenwald retirement community in Towson. She was 83. Born Patricia Cleary in Chicago, she was raised in Santa Monica, Calif., where she graduated from high school. She earned her bachelor's degree in interior design from the University of Michigan in 1944. She was married that year to Dr. Theodore H. Berlin, a Johns Hopkins University physics professor. In 1961, the couple moved from Towson to Scarsdale, N.Y., when her husband was appointed to the faculty of Rockefeller University in New York.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | October 18, 1998
Dr. William R. Brody of the Johns Hopkins University is one of 13 presidents of private colleges to earn more than $400,000, according to a survey released today by the Chronicle of Higher Education.The $435,592 paid to Brody in 1996-1997 put him ninth on the list headed by Rockefeller University's Torsten N. Weisel, who earned $546,966 in pay and benefits.In a recent interview, Michael R. Bloomberg, chairman of Johns Hopkins' board of trustees, said Brody was, if anything, underpaid. "I know people think he earns a lot of money, but he heads a $1.5 billion operation," he said.
NEWS
By Korky Vann and Korky Vann,HARTFORD COURANT | February 11, 2001
Most of us know that summer weather can put us at risk for dehydration if we don't get enough fluids. But drinking plenty of water each day is just as important in winter. According to a report from the Health Care Financing Administration, dehydration is a frequent cause of hospitalization among people over 65, and research shows that about half of those hospitalized for dehydration die within a year. Nearly a third of all cases of serious dehydration result from pneumonia and flu, which peak during the winter.
NEWS
May 23, 2003
C.A. Tripp, 83, the author of a widely read book that sought to dispel popular misconceptions about homosexuality, died of cancer Saturday in Nyack, N.Y. His book, The Homosexual Matrix, a scholarly work published by McGraw-Hill in 1975, set forth new ideas about sexual attraction and sold nearly 500,000 copies. Author and AIDS activist Larry Kramer said in an interview with The New York Times that the book was the first from a "reputable source" that "dared to speak openly of homosexuality as a healthy occurrence."
NEWS
By Newsday | May 18, 1993
Research challenged by allegations of fraud -- accusations that eventually forced out Nobel laureate David Baltimore from the presidency of Rockefeller University -- is accurate after all, scientists reported yesterday, the latest twist in one of the most celebrated scientific misconduct cases.According to a team of scientists at Columbia and Stanford universities, new experiments on the immune systems of genetically engineered mice indicate that the work of immunogeneticist Thereza Imanishi-Kari was accurate.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
Many people have heard of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg or Google co-founder Sergey Brin. But few know about Bert Vogelstein, a Johns Hopkins scientist who helped map the cancer genome and created gene and stool tests to detect colon cancer. A new, international award, similar to the Nobel Prize, but with a bigger payout of $3 million, aims to change that. On Wednesday, Zuckerberg and Brin joined Russian entrepreneur and venture capitalist Yuri Milner and Anne Wojcicki, founder of genetic testing company 23andMe, to launch the Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences.
NEWS
August 20, 2002
Patricia C. Berlin, a retired interior decorator and artist, died of respiratory failure Friday at Edenwald retirement community in Towson. She was 83. Born Patricia Cleary in Chicago, she was raised in Santa Monica, Calif., where she graduated from high school. She earned her bachelor's degree in interior design from the University of Michigan in 1944. She was married that year to Dr. Theodore H. Berlin, a Johns Hopkins University physics professor. In 1961, the couple moved from Towson to Scarsdale, N.Y., when her husband was appointed to the faculty of Rockefeller University in New York.
NEWS
By Korky Vann and Korky Vann,HARTFORD COURANT | February 11, 2001
Most of us know that summer weather can put us at risk for dehydration if we don't get enough fluids. But drinking plenty of water each day is just as important in winter. According to a report from the Health Care Financing Administration, dehydration is a frequent cause of hospitalization among people over 65, and research shows that about half of those hospitalized for dehydration die within a year. Nearly a third of all cases of serious dehydration result from pneumonia and flu, which peak during the winter.
NEWS
By Nicholas Wade and Nicholas Wade,New York Times News Service | October 8, 1999
Biologists must have gazed thousands of times through microscopes at the 46 chromosomes that lie in the nucleus of every normal human cell without perceiving what has now been discovered: the ends of the chromosomes - the immensely long molecules of DNA that carry the genetic information - are neatly tied in large, firmly knotted loops.The discovery bears on a long- puzzle, that of why the cell does not mistake the ends of intact chromosomes for the broken ends of cut chromosomes. A broken chromosome end sends the cell into full panic mode: If it cannot repair the broken end it will trigger its self-destruct mechanism and die for the common good rather than risk the genetic instability that leads to cancer.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | October 18, 1998
Dr. William R. Brody of the Johns Hopkins University is one of 13 presidents of private colleges to earn more than $400,000, according to a survey released today by the Chronicle of Higher Education.The $435,592 paid to Brody in 1996-1997 put him ninth on the list headed by Rockefeller University's Torsten N. Weisel, who earned $546,966 in pay and benefits.In a recent interview, Michael R. Bloomberg, chairman of Johns Hopkins' board of trustees, said Brody was, if anything, underpaid. "I know people think he earns a lot of money, but he heads a $1.5 billion operation," he said.
BUSINESS
April 18, 1996
MedImmune Inc., a Gaithersburg-based biotechnology company, said yesterday that it has agreed to collaborate with Rockefeller University to develop a vaccine to prevent or treat illnesses caused by a virulent bacteria, Streptococcus pneumoniae.MedImmune also struck a licensing deal with the New York school for the rights to commercialize any vaccines developed from the collaboration. The two did not disclose financial details of the agreement.The bacteria MedImmune and Rockefeller have targeted is the leading cause of blood stream infections, pneumonia and ear infections in children, and the third leading cause of meningitis.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 27, 1994
NEW YORK -- Over the years, scientists at Rockefeller University -- one of the world's pre-eminent research institutions -- have identified DNA, found the first cancer virus, grown the malaria parasite and wrestled with some of biology's most complex problems.Now, they are trying to solve their most terrifying mystery: Who may be trying to kill them?Police disclosed yesterday that someone at the research campus bordering the East River in Manhattan put poison in coffee and tea, deliberately left gas jets on in a molecular biology laboratory, set a fire and sent threatening letters to two eminent female scientists.
NEWS
By Nicholas Wade and Nicholas Wade,New York Times News Service | October 8, 1999
Biologists must have gazed thousands of times through microscopes at the 46 chromosomes that lie in the nucleus of every normal human cell without perceiving what has now been discovered: the ends of the chromosomes - the immensely long molecules of DNA that carry the genetic information - are neatly tied in large, firmly knotted loops.The discovery bears on a long- puzzle, that of why the cell does not mistake the ends of intact chromosomes for the broken ends of cut chromosomes. A broken chromosome end sends the cell into full panic mode: If it cannot repair the broken end it will trigger its self-destruct mechanism and die for the common good rather than risk the genetic instability that leads to cancer.
NEWS
By Newsday | May 18, 1993
Research challenged by allegations of fraud -- accusations that eventually forced out Nobel laureate David Baltimore from the presidency of Rockefeller University -- is accurate after all, scientists reported yesterday, the latest twist in one of the most celebrated scientific misconduct cases.According to a team of scientists at Columbia and Stanford universities, new experiments on the immune systems of genetically engineered mice indicate that the work of immunogeneticist Thereza Imanishi-Kari was accurate.
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