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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 12, 1999
NEW YORK -- In response to the emergence of more powerful foundations and its own sense that it might have been spreading itself too thin, the Rockefeller Foundation is changing its mission to focus exclusively on the world's poor.The foundation, which is based in New York, gives away about $170 million a year to hundreds of causes. The foundation expects to announce its plans tomorrow."Globalization has the capacity to eliminate poverty, eliminate hunger and greatly reduce disease and provide excellent education to everyone," said Gordon Conway, a British agricultural ecologist who joined the foundation last year as its 12th president.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | February 10, 2010
Rajaram Ramanathan, the retired chief financial and operations officer of the Annie E. Casey Foundation, died of cancer Feb. 2 at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Federal Hill resident was 74. Born near Madras, India, he earned psychology and political science degrees there and, after moving to New York City in 1971, he received a master's degree in public accounting from Baruch College. Mr. Ramanathan worked at the Rockefeller Foundation both in India and in the U.S., where he was controller.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 14, 2007
For most of the past century, three names - Carnegie, Ford and Rockefeller - have defined the world of foundation philanthropy, but that is changing. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, with a $30 billion-plus endowment that dwarfs all others, now dominates discussions of philanthropy, and the philanthropic experiments of young billionaires like Pierre Omidyar and Jeff Skoll are studied and mimicked. But the Carnegie Corp. and the Rockefeller Foundation are fighting back, hoping to get more impact for their money, increase their influence and extend their legacies by changing the way they have operated for years.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 14, 2007
For most of the past century, three names - Carnegie, Ford and Rockefeller - have defined the world of foundation philanthropy, but that is changing. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, with a $30 billion-plus endowment that dwarfs all others, now dominates discussions of philanthropy, and the philanthropic experiments of young billionaires like Pierre Omidyar and Jeff Skoll are studied and mimicked. But the Carnegie Corp. and the Rockefeller Foundation are fighting back, hoping to get more impact for their money, increase their influence and extend their legacies by changing the way they have operated for years.
NEWS
By Kristi Heim and Sandi Doughton and Kristi Heim and Sandi Doughton,Seattle Times | September 17, 2006
Hoping to reduce hunger and poverty by sparking a "green revolution" in Africa, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has announced a new partnership with the Rockefeller Foundation aimed at dramatically increasing productivity of small farms in the poorest region of the world. The project faces a challenge to succeed in a region characterized by harsh and highly varied conditions, while avoiding pitfalls of earlier efforts that poisoned some ecosystems with fertilizers and pesticides and drained rivers and wetlands for irrigation.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | February 10, 2010
Rajaram Ramanathan, the retired chief financial and operations officer of the Annie E. Casey Foundation, died of cancer Feb. 2 at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Federal Hill resident was 74. Born near Madras, India, he earned psychology and political science degrees there and, after moving to New York City in 1971, he received a master's degree in public accounting from Baruch College. Mr. Ramanathan worked at the Rockefeller Foundation both in India and in the U.S., where he was controller.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2004
Robert Zanes Brown of Annapolis, a retired biology professor and scientist, died Thursday of multiple myeloma at Anne Arundel Medical Center. He was 77. In a lengthy career, Dr. Brown, who studied rodent-borne diseases and rodent behavior, held positions at several research and educational institutions. He published papers on army-ant behavior, mouse biology, rodent control, water supplies and rain forest ecology. He moved to Annapolis in 1993 when he retired from Dowling College in Oakdale, N.Y., where he had been a biology professor for nearly three decades.
NEWS
December 8, 2002
THE ANNIE E. Casey Foundation has a long tradition of hands-on involvement in efforts to solve social problems. Even so, the locally headquartered foundation's decision to become a godfather to the planned East Baltimore biotech park is unusual. For one thing, Casey has added $5 million of its money to supplement city relocation compensation to hundreds of residents whose houses will be razed. With the Johns Hopkins University matching that amount, the goal is to make a difference in the lives of people residing in one of the city's most depressed areas.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | March 18, 1991
How do you get Wall Street with its fiscal muscle to back housing in the South Bronx and its devastated Fort Apache neighborhood? What's the trick to tap main-line finance for thousands of low-income housing projects that community-development corporations are itching to put up in neighborhoods coast to coast?Peter Goldmark, former head of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, put that question to the foundation world two years ago. He had just assumed the presidency of the Rockefeller Foundation, America's fifth-largest.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | July 14, 1996
HOW EXTRAORDINARY the Baltimore welcome has been!" remarked one of our newest residents, Rick Little, at a dinner party Mayor Kurt Schmoke gave for him, his wife, Elaine, and the board of directors of the International Youth Foundation (IYF).This foundation selected Baltimore over finalists Atlanta and London as the new home for its corporate headquarters. This 6-year-old foundation is dedicated to improving conditions and prospects for all the world's children and youth.No sooner had the headquarters opened than board members from all over the world arrived for a meeting and a look at the foundation's new home at 34 Market Place.
NEWS
By Kristi Heim and Sandi Doughton and Kristi Heim and Sandi Doughton,Seattle Times | September 17, 2006
Hoping to reduce hunger and poverty by sparking a "green revolution" in Africa, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has announced a new partnership with the Rockefeller Foundation aimed at dramatically increasing productivity of small farms in the poorest region of the world. The project faces a challenge to succeed in a region characterized by harsh and highly varied conditions, while avoiding pitfalls of earlier efforts that poisoned some ecosystems with fertilizers and pesticides and drained rivers and wetlands for irrigation.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2004
Robert Zanes Brown of Annapolis, a retired biology professor and scientist, died Thursday of multiple myeloma at Anne Arundel Medical Center. He was 77. In a lengthy career, Dr. Brown, who studied rodent-borne diseases and rodent behavior, held positions at several research and educational institutions. He published papers on army-ant behavior, mouse biology, rodent control, water supplies and rain forest ecology. He moved to Annapolis in 1993 when he retired from Dowling College in Oakdale, N.Y., where he had been a biology professor for nearly three decades.
NEWS
December 8, 2002
THE ANNIE E. Casey Foundation has a long tradition of hands-on involvement in efforts to solve social problems. Even so, the locally headquartered foundation's decision to become a godfather to the planned East Baltimore biotech park is unusual. For one thing, Casey has added $5 million of its money to supplement city relocation compensation to hundreds of residents whose houses will be razed. With the Johns Hopkins University matching that amount, the goal is to make a difference in the lives of people residing in one of the city's most depressed areas.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 12, 1999
NEW YORK -- In response to the emergence of more powerful foundations and its own sense that it might have been spreading itself too thin, the Rockefeller Foundation is changing its mission to focus exclusively on the world's poor.The foundation, which is based in New York, gives away about $170 million a year to hundreds of causes. The foundation expects to announce its plans tomorrow."Globalization has the capacity to eliminate poverty, eliminate hunger and greatly reduce disease and provide excellent education to everyone," said Gordon Conway, a British agricultural ecologist who joined the foundation last year as its 12th president.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | July 14, 1996
HOW EXTRAORDINARY the Baltimore welcome has been!" remarked one of our newest residents, Rick Little, at a dinner party Mayor Kurt Schmoke gave for him, his wife, Elaine, and the board of directors of the International Youth Foundation (IYF).This foundation selected Baltimore over finalists Atlanta and London as the new home for its corporate headquarters. This 6-year-old foundation is dedicated to improving conditions and prospects for all the world's children and youth.No sooner had the headquarters opened than board members from all over the world arrived for a meeting and a look at the foundation's new home at 34 Market Place.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | March 18, 1991
How do you get Wall Street with its fiscal muscle to back housing in the South Bronx and its devastated Fort Apache neighborhood? What's the trick to tap main-line finance for thousands of low-income housing projects that community-development corporations are itching to put up in neighborhoods coast to coast?Peter Goldmark, former head of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, put that question to the foundation world two years ago. He had just assumed the presidency of the Rockefeller Foundation, America's fifth-largest.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | September 26, 1999
It was a chance to eat, drink and be "mari" -- as in "Maritime Magic '99," the annual waterfront bash at the Living Classrooms Foundation's Fells Point campus.You could graze at the spread set out by more than 35 local restaurants and caterers, then work it off on the dance floor to the tunes of the Skip Castro Band and Samba Ngo. Some of the hardier partyers climbed the seven-story Rouse Flick Learning Tower, to get a grander gander at the Inner Harbor skyline.Among the 1,250 enjoying the evening: James Bond, foundation president and CEO; Parker Rockefeller, foundation senior vice president; Wilbur E. "Bill" Cunningham, foundation VP; Gail Shawe, Stuart Walman, Jim Pomfret, Bill Blake and Drake Zaharis, board members; Ernest Cole, Living Classrooms instructor; Paris Lee, president of 21st Century Group; Bill Hopkinson, Jacor Baltimore's director of sales; and Warner Mason, president of Webb/Mason Inc.The night netted about $150,000 for Living Classrooms' educational programs for disadvantaged and at-risk youth.
BUSINESS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2011
The Traffic Group, a White Marsh-based transportation planning firm, has been chosen by Montgomery County officials to prepare a conceptual blueprint and cost estimate for a bus rapid transit system to serve the state's most populous jurisdiction and the home of Maryland's worst traffic congestion. The system would consist of a 150-mile network of express lanes stretching from Gaithersburg to Silver Spring that would be capable of handling 207,000 passengers daily - which would make it one of the largest bus rapid transit systems in the nation.
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