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Rockefeller Center

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BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | September 12, 1995
NEW YORK -- The Japanese company that controls Rockefeller Center has decided to auction a majority stake in the bankrupt New York landmark.In papers filed Friday in bankruptcy court, the owner asked for a 60-day extension of the period during which it has the exclusive right to present a plan of reorganization. That will give it time to either hand the property over to its creditors or seek bids for the office and retail complex.The owner, two partnerships controlled by Mitsubishi Estate Co., has until today to present a plan to the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York.
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FEATURES
November 30, 2005
Sheryl Crow (above) and Carrie Underwood are scheduled to perform on Christmas in Rockefeller Center (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11).
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BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | November 18, 1994
NEW YORK -- Rockefeller Center Properties, the public company that holds the $1.3 billion mortgage on Rockefeller Center, said yesterday that it had arranged to sell $225 million in long-term debt, averting what had been a looming financial crisis.The deal does not affect the company's more fundamental problem: that Rockefeller Center's owner, the Rockefeller Group, which is controlled by Mitsubishi Estate Co. of Japan, does not have enough money to make the payments on the mortgage and may default on the loan.
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | December 20, 2004
ATLANTA -- I should have known better. For all the money I spent to make sure she enjoyed her first trip to New York City, her favorite thing was the revolving door at the hotel. Not The Nutcracker performed by the New York City Ballet. Never mind that it was George Balanchine's classic choreography or that the staging was awesome or that the ticket prices were stratospheric. It rated only fourth on her list. (And I think that was just to spare my feelings.) Still, she had a good time.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 13, 1995
MENDHAM, N.J. -- Every few years since 1984, the suitors from Rockefeller Center came calling, and every time, the nuns demurred.They were flattered. But they were not going to part with the towering, perfectly sculptured evergreen that had stood by the front door to their convent for more than half a century, blessing them with shade in summer and solace in winter.Then they grew worried. The tree was getting older, taller, which rendered it more vulnerable to elements and ailments. The nuns wanted an end for it more glorious than lightning or rot.So, gardeners from Rockefeller Center plan to cut it down tomorrow.
FEATURES
November 30, 2005
Sheryl Crow (above) and Carrie Underwood are scheduled to perform on Christmas in Rockefeller Center (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11).
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | May 16, 1995
If Don does not run for mayor, the flap over purging his claque from the Convention Center Board was for nothing.In Japan as in the U.S., the defense forces are equipped to repel invaders, while the enemy is within.Don't look now, but the NAACP has its act together.Just because Rockefeller Center is bankrupt doesn't mean the American dream is.No more Mr. Nice Guy. Kurt is in campaign mode.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diane Macklin and Diane Macklin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 16, 2004
New York City in a day? It's hard to imagine, what with all there is to do. However, if you ride with one of several local luxury bus companies that leave from the Baltimore area, you can begin your journey stress-free. In about three hours, you will be enjoying the sights and sounds in Manhattan. Holiday shopping, fabulous shows, ice skating in Rockefeller Center and viewing the Christmas tree in Rockefeller Center are a few reasons to make the day trip. What to do Rockefeller Center (Fifth Avenue to Seventh Avenue, between 47th and 51st streets)
BUSINESS
May 12, 1995
Rockefeller Center owners fileTwo Japanese-controlled partnerships that own Rockefeller Center filed for bankruptcy protection yesterday, ending a protracted effort to bail out the prestigious property in the center of Manhattan.The failure of the partnerships, controlled by Japan's Mitsubishi TC Corp., adds to a growing list of big failures for Japanese investors in the United States.The partnerships, Rockefeller Center Properties and RCP Associates, said the Chapter 11 bankruptcy filing was caused by the "deep and prolonged recession in the New York real estate market."
BUSINESS
November 17, 1994
National Gypsum receives offerNational Gypsum Co. said yesterday it received a $940 million buyout offer from Delcor Inc., sending the building products maker's stock soaring.Delcor Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of privately held, Charlotte, N.C.-based Golden Eagle Industries Inc., offered $43.50 a share in cash for the gypsum and wallboard maker, which has a plant in Southeast Baltimore.Charlotte-based National Gypsum's stock rose $12.0625, about 37 percent, to $44.8125 on the Nasdaq system.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diane Macklin and Diane Macklin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 16, 2004
New York City in a day? It's hard to imagine, what with all there is to do. However, if you ride with one of several local luxury bus companies that leave from the Baltimore area, you can begin your journey stress-free. In about three hours, you will be enjoying the sights and sounds in Manhattan. Holiday shopping, fabulous shows, ice skating in Rockefeller Center and viewing the Christmas tree in Rockefeller Center are a few reasons to make the day trip. What to do Rockefeller Center (Fifth Avenue to Seventh Avenue, between 47th and 51st streets)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2004
NEW YORK - As noontime strollers swarm Rockefeller Plaza on a late summer weekday, they crane their necks skyward to take full measure of Jonathan Borofsky's new 100-foot sculpture, Walking to the Sky. Workers from the plaza's surrounding skyscrapers, eating lunch on circular benches, gaze at it, while tourists speaking multiple languages contort themselves to photograph the towering structure, a gently arcing stainless-steel pole upon which seven fiberglass...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ariella Budick and Ariella Budick,NEWSDAY | October 12, 2003
NEW YORK - Here are a few snapshots of contemporary culture: The Marshall Field's catalog features a silk dressing gown with the Superman logo for $59.95. Nearly 19 million grown-up Americans are regular viewers of SpongeBob Squarepants. J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter saga has proved to be a literary sales phenomenon - among adults. And through today, the plaza at Rockefeller Center is surmounted by a 30-foot cartoon creature with a tapering head and an oversupply of limbs. His name is Tongari-kun, or Mr. Pointy, and he is the brainchild of Takashi Murakami, the hyper-hip Japanese artist who has become an international celebrity.
NEWS
By John J. Goldman and John J. Goldman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 28, 2003
NEW YORK - Anti-war protesters chanting "Peace Now!" blocked Fifth Avenue in front of Rockefeller Center during yesterday morning's rush hour and by evening police had arrested 215 demonstrators in that and other incidents. The symbolic "die-in" at Rockefeller Center was designed to show support for Iraqi war victims. Later, members of the same coalition staged a mock funeral on Fifth Avenue while a dozen people tried to block the main entrance to Tiffany's several blocks north of the larger demonstration.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | October 13, 2001
When she got word late yesterday morning, Joanna Giddon, a pregnant NBC spokeswoman, bolted to an exit on the 25th floor of 30 Rockefeller Center in New York City. As she ran, she shouted over her shoulder: "Everybody get out of the building - there's anthrax!" With a mixture of resignation, gallows humor and outright alarm, the city's tightly knit community of journalists tried to keep focused yesterday on telling the larger story, even as they became part of it themselves. The newspapers and the nightly news are filled each day with developments about the terrorist attacks and subsequent military activity in Afghanistan.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | October 5, 2001
BOSTON - New York should rebuild its devastated World Trade Center district with great structures that are designed for the 21st century, not a carbon copy of the towers that were there before. Rockefeller Center and Battery Park City could be models for the sort of high-density, multi-building environment that would be appropriate for Lower Manhattan. It is neither necessary nor desirable to build replacement structures that rise 110 stories, the height of the twin towers that were destroyed after terrorists slammed two hijacked planes into them three weeks ago. That's the consensus of urban planning experts who addressed 3,700 designers, developers and public officials gathered here this week for the fall conference of the Urban Land Institute, a research and educational organization that promotes responsible planning and development.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | December 3, 1995
Construction workers, grateful for steady work in the midst of the Great Depression, spontaneously planted a Christmas tree in the middle of their muddy building site in New York City. They gathered around the branches to receive their paychecks on Christmas eve. That was in 1931, when Rockefeller Center was being built. Ever since, its Christmas tree has been a holiday tradition venerated by generations of New Yorkers and recognized around the world.This is also one tradition every family visiting New York can share, regardless of budget.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 14, 1993
NEW YORK -- President Clinton came to New York yesterday to attend a fund-raising dinner for Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan, but even before he checked into his room at the Waldorf or polished his dancing shoes, he did what all good tourists are doing in Manhattan these days: He went shopping.The impromptu shopping sojourn stopped traffic, flustered shopkeepers and ruffled the feathers of not a few New Yorkers who complained that the presidential fuss was making them late. After all, they had work to do, errands to run, trains to hop -- sales to catch.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | December 3, 1995
Construction workers, grateful for steady work in the midst of the Great Depression, spontaneously planted a Christmas tree in the middle of their muddy building site in New York City. They gathered around the branches to receive their paychecks on Christmas eve. That was in 1931, when Rockefeller Center was being built. Ever since, its Christmas tree has been a holiday tradition venerated by generations of New Yorkers and recognized around the world.This is also one tradition every family visiting New York can share, regardless of budget.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 13, 1995
MENDHAM, N.J. -- Every few years since 1984, the suitors from Rockefeller Center came calling, and every time, the nuns demurred.They were flattered. But they were not going to part with the towering, perfectly sculptured evergreen that had stood by the front door to their convent for more than half a century, blessing them with shade in summer and solace in winter.Then they grew worried. The tree was getting older, taller, which rendered it more vulnerable to elements and ailments. The nuns wanted an end for it more glorious than lightning or rot.So, gardeners from Rockefeller Center plan to cut it down tomorrow.
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