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Rock The Vote

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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 26, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Grainy black-and-white footage fills the television screen with energetic young men slashing and weaving on skateboards across the concrete and curbs in Santa Cruz, Calif. A narrator breaks into the punk-rock soundtrack: "Call them what you want, but these guys asked the City Council for a skateboard park -- and got it."With that, the skaters disappear from the streets and instead soar above a half-pipe ramp. A message appears: "Rock the Nation."This prototype public service announcement, the likes of which could appear on MTV and other stations as soon as July 2, typifies a new two-year campaign planned by Santa Monica, Calif.
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NEWS
By Joel Stein | October 13, 2008
Don't vote. People will try to guilt you into it, but stay strong and resist. I'm talking to all of you who don't feel strongly about either presidential candidate, not just those 80 undecided idiots seated at last week's town hall-style debate. Those people just crave attention and are way too proud of skimming enough Google News headlines to formulate a question. Give each a hug and a Debate Attendee diploma, and I bet they'll pick a candidate real fast. Voting is not an act of charity.
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FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 28, 1990
For some time now, popular music has been under attack i this country.From the rash of record-labeling proposals that surfaced in state legislatures earlier this year to the recent obscenity cases against rappers 2 Live Crew, pop musicians have been taking heat on a number of fronts. In recent months, records have been banned, concerts canceled and rock groups sued, and it's a trend that shows no sign of abating.It used to be that the worst a performer would face after a concert was a bad review, but these days, many musicians find themselves facing arrest.
NEWS
By William E. Gibson and William E. Gibson,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | February 28, 2005
WASHINGTON - Amid big-bucks lobbying by more powerful groups, Rock the Vote is reaching out to younger Americans over the Internet while planning concerts and advertisements to bring a youthful influence to the debate over the national retirement system. Rock the Vote, an organization intent on stirring political involvement by young people, is one of many participants in an intense public lobbying campaign on all sides of the debate. Residents of Florida and other key states, barely recovered from an onslaught of election ads last year, now face a campaign-style blitz on Social Security.
NEWS
By William E. Gibson and William E. Gibson,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | February 28, 2005
WASHINGTON - Amid big-bucks lobbying by more powerful groups, Rock the Vote is reaching out to younger Americans over the Internet while planning concerts and advertisements to bring a youthful influence to the debate over the national retirement system. Rock the Vote, an organization intent on stirring political involvement by young people, is one of many participants in an intense public lobbying campaign on all sides of the debate. Residents of Florida and other key states, barely recovered from an onslaught of election ads last year, now face a campaign-style blitz on Social Security.
NEWS
July 15, 1993
* Patrick Lippert, 35, leader of last year's celebrated Rock the Vote political campaign, died of AIDS complications Tuesday at Daniel Freeman Hospital in Marina del Rey, Calif., after a two-year illness. In 1991, Mr. Lippert became executive director of Rock the Vote, a nationwide campaign to sign up young voters that relied heavily on MTV. The group registered 350,000 people, and claimed credit for an 18 percent increase in the turnout among 18- to 24-year-olds in the 1992 election.
NEWS
July 16, 1993
Patrick LippertLed Rock the Vote moveLOS ANGELES -- Patrick Lippert, the leader of last year's celebrated Rock the Vote campaign to sign up MTV-generation voters, died of acquired immune deficiency syndrome complications Tuesday. He was 35.In 1991, Mr. Lippert became executive director of Rock the Vote, which relied heavily on MTV in registering 350,000 people.Mr. Lippert worked in the state Assembly campaign of Tom Hayden, now a state senator. He later became director of a Hollywood political action group created by Mr. Hayden and Jane Fonda, then his wife.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 21, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Trying to make voting ever easier for young people, the group Rock the Vote has moved registration tables to rap concerts, movie theaters and surfing championships.Now the group has begun a service on the World Wide Web that will fill out young people's registration cards and even stick on the stamps.The prospective voters need only sign and mail the cards. "Pretty soon, they won't even have to get up off the couch," said Jay E. Reiff of the North Carolina Democratic Senate Caucus.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | September 23, 1992
There's a segment in tonight's "Rock the Vote" special on Fox that's a virtual manifesto for twentysomething.Shot in black and white, the screen is filled with alternating tight face shots of Jason Priestley from "Beverly Hills, 90210," and Lisa Bonet, formerly of "Cosby" and "A Different World."Bonet: "Some people say our generation doesn't count."Priestley: "Yeah, right."L Bonet: "Which generation insisted on dolphin-friendly tuna?"Priestley: "And inspired a fourth TV network? We've got advertisers begging for our attention."
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | October 18, 1990
HOLLYWOOD -- Leave it to Madonna.Who else could transform the simple act of voting into a provocative display of sexual innuendo?Monday night, MTV will debut the pop siren's latest video clip: a 60-second, rap-oriented public service advertisement in which she encourages her fans to express themselves at the voting booth:Dr. King, Malcom XFreedom of speechIs as good as sex.Madonna delivers the rhyme wearing red bikini underwear with an American flag curled around her shoulders. She ends the clip with the teasing quip, "If you don't vote, you're going to get a spankie."
NEWS
By Nicholas Leonhardt | November 3, 2004
IF THE TEEN-AGE years are a series of teachable moments interspersed with really loud rock music, then what did Election 2004 teach American youths? Some possibilities: Take a debate class. Of course, it may not boost a teen's social status like kicking the winning field goal at homecoming, but who knew that debate skills could separate the winners from the losers? In media-driven, image-conscious America, it's not enough to have a well-defined plan for success; one must also articulate it well.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Katharine Goodloe and Katharine Goodloe,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 2, 2004
WASHINGTON - Calling young voters - literally: Cell phones are the newest link to the political arena, as get-out-the-vote efforts begin using text messages to reach them. The technology, which lets users send and receive short text-based messages from their cell phones, hit the mainstream after the 2002 launch of television's American Idol. Viewers of the reality/talent show used text messages to vote for contestants after each episode. Voter drives want to apply that surge of text message popularity to the real world - and to November's presidential election.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl | August 28, 2004
MTV's "Rock the Vote" campaign hits Baltimore tonight with a voter registration drive and other events at Club One downtown. One of Baltimore's most popular nightclubs, Club One will distribute information on the Democratic and Republican parties to club-goers and encourage them to register to vote. City Council member Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. is also scheduled to make an appearance, along with other area politicians and candidates. The event organizer and a Club One promoter, Heidi Klotzman, said young people seem more engaged in this election than in previous ones, and she hopes to capitalize on that and get them to the polls in November.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 14, 2004
The year is 1912, and two suffragettes are sitting in a Philadelphia coffee shop having a friendly argument about political strategy. One cites progress made in the national campaign. The other says, "What? Sixty-four years of begging, and women can now vote in nine states? How many years is that per state? ... You do the math." "Look," her friend says, warning her that such statements could cost them a promotion to the national office, "you want to be two girls on a corner soap box? Or, do you want to go to Washington and play with the big lads?"
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 28, 2000
HARTFORD, Conn. - Politicians are used to appealing for votes in the interest of mankind. But here was Mankind appealing for votes on behalf of pols. Sort of. Mankind, aka Mick Foley, is the king-sized commissioner of the World Wresting Federation, which has launched perhaps the most unorthodox voter registration drive of the fall. Politically, it makes sense. WWF's strongest demographic - 18- to 34-year-olds - is also a group that doesn't vote very much. By seeking to appear civic-minded, WWF can try to fend off politically inspired criticism of sex and violence in its programs.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 26, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Grainy black-and-white footage fills the television screen with energetic young men slashing and weaving on skateboards across the concrete and curbs in Santa Cruz, Calif. A narrator breaks into the punk-rock soundtrack: "Call them what you want, but these guys asked the City Council for a skateboard park -- and got it."With that, the skaters disappear from the streets and instead soar above a half-pipe ramp. A message appears: "Rock the Nation."This prototype public service announcement, the likes of which could appear on MTV and other stations as soon as July 2, typifies a new two-year campaign planned by Santa Monica, Calif.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl | August 28, 2004
MTV's "Rock the Vote" campaign hits Baltimore tonight with a voter registration drive and other events at Club One downtown. One of Baltimore's most popular nightclubs, Club One will distribute information on the Democratic and Republican parties to club-goers and encourage them to register to vote. City Council member Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. is also scheduled to make an appearance, along with other area politicians and candidates. The event organizer and a Club One promoter, Heidi Klotzman, said young people seem more engaged in this election than in previous ones, and she hopes to capitalize on that and get them to the polls in November.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Katharine Goodloe and Katharine Goodloe,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 2, 2004
WASHINGTON - Calling young voters - literally: Cell phones are the newest link to the political arena, as get-out-the-vote efforts begin using text messages to reach them. The technology, which lets users send and receive short text-based messages from their cell phones, hit the mainstream after the 2002 launch of television's American Idol. Viewers of the reality/talent show used text messages to vote for contestants after each episode. Voter drives want to apply that surge of text message popularity to the real world - and to November's presidential election.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1996
SALISBURY -- From Don Singleton's class on political communication at Salisbury State University, the making of the president 1996 seems a lamentable thing -- populated by the ethically challenged and reported by the unprincipled to the thoroughly distracted.Among these younger voters, the suggestion that "trust" might be a crucial issue in this year's campaign is almost laughable."Trust is pretty much a dead issue," said Jennifer Young of Hollywood, Md. This is so because "politicians are corrupt."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 21, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Trying to make voting ever easier for young people, the group Rock the Vote has moved registration tables to rap concerts, movie theaters and surfing championships.Now the group has begun a service on the World Wide Web that will fill out young people's registration cards and even stick on the stamps.The prospective voters need only sign and mail the cards. "Pretty soon, they won't even have to get up off the couch," said Jay E. Reiff of the North Carolina Democratic Senate Caucus.
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