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NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | September 22, 1991
Used condoms and black muck lay tangled in the grass Friday between a county manhole and Rock Creek's troubled headwaters.A health inspector discovered the sewage spill accidentally Friday morning, prompting Rock Creek activists to renew their calls for immediate action to clean up the Patapsco River tributary.Officials with the county Department of Utilities confirmed Friday that sewage had spilled from the manhole, which lies between the Rock Creek pumping station and the Cox Creek Waste Water Treatment Plant.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 27, 2014
A Washington-area trail users' group and a pair of environmental advocates have filed suit to block the Purple Line , contending the $2.4 billion light-rail project in the DC suburbs threatens to harm two species of endangered crustaceans that live in the creek the transit line would cross. The Friends of the Capital Crescent Trail and John M. Fitzgerald and Christine Real de Azua of Chevy Chase asked the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia Tuesday to overturn clearance given the project earlier this year by the Federal Transit Administration and require federal agencies to explore alternate routes for the rail line.
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NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Staff writer | September 5, 1991
Police were unsure yesterday whether a Riviera Beach man who disappeared into Rock Creek on Tuesday night while trying to escape police had drowned or made it to shore.Natural Resources police still were dredging the water yesterday afternoon for the body of Timothy Patrick Mahon, 28, of the 100 block of Dunlap Road.Officers last saw Mahon bobbing in the water about 300 feet from shore, near a buoy marked with reflectors.Officers were called tothe Dunlap Road area to pick up Mahon, who was wanted for violating his probation on a breaking-and-entering conviction and traffic violations.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2013
As gulls and cormorants perched on the walls of Fort Carroll looked on, a crabbing boat stopped long enough to jettison 30 bushel baskets of very special oyster shells into the Patapsco River. On the boat, a handful of Pasadena residents spent their Saturday afternoon planting young oysters in a reef, just as they might have been putting in a crop of tomatoes or zinnias. "We call it Oysters Rock, because we live on Rock Creek," said Chris Wallis, 68, the day's volunteer director.
NEWS
October 11, 1993
Police and rescue workers searched by boat and helicopter in vain yesterday for an unidentified man who reportedly slipped into the water in Rock Creek after joining acquaintances on a boat.Police said late yesterday that investigators still had not determined whether a man seen jumping from a boat about 3 a.m. yesterday had drowned in the Anne Arundel County waterway near Riviera Beach.Joyce M. Williams, spokeswoman for the Maryland Natural Resources Police, said officers were still attempting to piece together the puzzle of the missing man.She said police were told that four people on the boat were joined by the man, whose name they did not know, and that somehow he ended up in the water near the Maryland Yacht Club.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | July 16, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer had received enough letters and phone calls from residents to sniff out the problem for himself.Two weeks ago, the do-it-now governor drove to Rock Creek in Pasadena and took a whiff.Residents have complained for more than 12 years about the rotten-egg smell caused by hydrogen sulfide gas belched from the creek bottom. Some residents claim the foul-smelling gas has begun to make themill.Schaefer has been aware of the residents' concerns for some time, said Ray Feldmann, a spokesman for the governor.
NEWS
February 20, 1991
FROM: DARLENE SCHEPLENGPASADENAAS A PART OF OUR NORTH COUNTY CREEK COMMISSION ACTIVITIES, LINDA DOOLEY ANDI BACK IN 1985 WERE INSPECTING THE CONSTRUCTION OF RAYNOR BOULEVARD. WEDISCOVERED AN AREA OF OUR WOODS THAT WAS COMPLETELY COVERED WITH SAND. WESOUGHT TO FIND THE SOURCE OF THE PROBLEM.WE DISCOVERED A STREAM, IN EXCESS OF 1,000 FEET IN LENGTH, WHICH WAS TOTALLYBURIED UNDER THOUSANDS OF TONS OF SAND. THE CAUSE WAS A BLOW-OUT OF AN ENTIREHILLSIDE FROM A STORM DRAIN ON A CONSTRUCTION SITE.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 6, 2002
Anne Arundel County health officials will be testing the water again today around the headwaters of Rock Creek in Pasadena, where more than 50,000 gallons of sewage and waste water spilled into the creek Friday. Health officials warned residents in the affected area, from Tower Bridge Road to south of the Fort Smallwood Bridge, to avoid contact with the creek, said Pam Jordan, county information officer. Anyone coming in contact with water from Rock Creek should immediately wash their hands and clothing.
NEWS
By Amy P. Ingram and Amy P. Ingram,Contributing Writer | December 22, 1993
Janet and Scotty Staude can remember when the children of Rock Creek Beach Community could dive off piers into six feet of water and boats could motor freely around White Pond."
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | February 4, 1992
A dredge boat could begin excavating polluted soils from the headwaters of Rock Creek by Monday if federal regulators accept a compromiseendorsed yesterday by U.S. Rep. Tom McMillen.Compton Wilson, owner of Southern Maryland Dredging Co., said he must begin digging soonif he is to complete the experimental dredge before spawning season begins in March.Yesterday, after receiving pledges from state and county officials to do more extensive environmental restoration if needed later, theArmy Corps of Engineers and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agencysaid they may approve the dredging as early as Feb. 10.State andcounty officials sought permission last fall to remove sulfur-rich sediments from Rock Creek above the Pekin Road Bridge, since a contractor was already nearby, dredging below the bridge.
SPORTS
By Liz Clarke and The Washington Post | April 26, 2012
The Legg Mason Tennis Classic, a staple of the late-summer sporting scene in the Washington area for more than four decades, is getting a dramatic makeover that will include a new title sponsor, stadium upgrades and shared billing with an existing tournament for rising women's players. The key development driving the changes is a new title sponsor in Citigroup, which will replace Baltimore-based Legg Mason after an 18-year association with the hard-court classic. To be known as the Citi Open, the tournament will remain at Washington's William H.G. FitzGerald Tennis Center in Rock Creek Park.
NEWS
February 4, 2008
On February 1, 2008, GLADYS IRENE, beloved aunt of Dolores Beck (nee Jones), Richard E. Jones and wife Emelie, Judy M. Pitt (nee Jones), Wilson S. Davis and wife Pat. Also survived by many great nieces and nephews. Services will be held Monday 2P.M. at Rock Creek Methodist Church, Chance, MD. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Rock Creek Cemetery Fund.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 16, 2006
Not only was it a dark and stormy night -- it was muggy, too. But that didn't stop the recently formed Friends of Back Creek Park from going to work. Members of the nonprofit organization met for several hours Wednesday night during intermittent thunderstorms to plant native grasses in the small Back Creek Park in Annapolis. "We had nine hearty souls dancing around the lightning bolts," said Mel Wilkins, a group member. The grasses, planted along the shoreline that the group had recently rehabilitated, will serve several purposes: They will be food for ducks and a place for fish to lay eggs, and they will prevent erosion, Wilkins said.
NEWS
November 5, 2005
On Monday, October 31, 2005, CHARLES THOMAS "Duke" POTTER, 78, of Princess Anne, formerly of Baltimore, died at Manokin Manor Nursing Home in Princess Anne. Born in Auburn, Rhode Island on January 21, 1927, he was a son of the late Frederick C. Potter and Blandine J. Plante Potter. Mr. Potter had formerly worked as a truck driver. He was a WWII Navy veteran who served in the Pacific with military honors. He was also a member of the Western Pennsylvania Teamsters & Employers Union of Pittsburgh and the Freight Drivers & Helpers Local 557 in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2005
DERWOOD - When Debbie Downs learned the state wanted to take her home to build a highway, the news didn't come from a newspaper or TV. It came from Sherry Antonetti's driveway across the street, where the 7-months-pregnant mother of six got down on hands and knees to scrawl in chalk: "Thanks Gov, There Goes The Neighborhood." Antonetti and Downs are two of the Montgomery County residents most affected by the Ehrlich administration's decision last week on its favored route for the long-debated Inter-County Connector linking Interstate 95 with Interstate 270. If the state's plans win federal approval and can weather an expected court challenge, Downs will have to move from her comfortable middle-class home on Olde Mill Run in the upscale 1970s-era subdivision of Winters Run so the state can demolish it. Antonetti, 39, has been told she will not have to move, but her new next-door "neighbor" would be a six-lane, $2.4 billion toll road.
NEWS
By Richard Rainey and Richard Rainey,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 25, 2004
WASHINGTON - For several months, people had been seeing them among the trees, most often in the long light of dusk: lithe, clandestine creatures slinking over the hillsides that mark the city limits. "I was driving up Oregon Avenue with my son, and somewhere about 7 in the evening, we both saw this dog-like mammal," said Frank Buchholz, who lives in the Chevy Chase section of Northwest Washington. "We both said, `Coyote.'" Buchholz questioned his assumption for days, until National Park Service ranger Ken Ferebee spotted a furry interloper Sept.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | March 31, 1992
A slurry of sand churned the headwaters of Rock Creek yesterday as adredging contractor began to replace the malodorous muck that has plagued the tributary for 14 years with a new, sandy bottom.What should have been a monumental victory for a handful of residents who pushed county, state and federal bureaucracies for nearly a decade to clean up the creek instead left them fuming on the Pekin Road Bridge."This is the worst environmental disaster ever to hit the creek,"said Linda Dooley, who lives on the headwaters, between the Pekin and Fort Smallwood Road bridges.
NEWS
July 25, 2004
On July 22, 2004 COURTNEY MICHAEL, beloved son of Herbert E. and the late Vivian O. Nutter. He is also survived by one brother Ernest R. Terry, one sister Deloria A. Terry, aunts, niece, nephew, one sister-in-law, a devoted friend Marion Johnson, other relatives and friends. Viewing will be held at St. James Episcopal Church, Lafayette and Arlington Avenues on Monday 2 to 6 P.M. and on Tuesday 2 to 7 P.M. at Marshalls Funeral Home, 4217 9th Street, N.W., Washington, DC. Family will recieve friends at St. Paul Episcopal Church, Rock Creek Church Road and Webster Street on Wednesday 10 to 11 A.M. with Mass of Christian Burial immediately following.
NEWS
By From staff reports | August 5, 2003
Chissell sworn in as 17th mayor of Highland Beach Crystal R. Chissell has assumed the top elected position in Highland Beach, one of Maryland's smallest incorporated towns. Chissell, who was sworn in as mayor Thursday, succeeds two-term incumbent Raymond Langston. She ran unopposed and won a four-year term July 26. Langston "did not want to run for re-election, and it seemed a logical step for me," she said. "I had already been doing so much work for the town." Chissell, 41, works as an assistant attorney general providing counsel to the Maryland Environmental Service.
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