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By Candus Thomson | candy.thomson@baltsun.com | March 21, 2010
At 31⁄2 years old, Earl Jenkins IV likes to imitate his dad. And if that means setting a state fishing record — the one claimed by his father not quite a year ago — sorry, old man. The Thurmont youngster is an accomplished angler, reeling in his first smallmouth bass last summer and fishing with Earl Jenkins III every chance he gets. On Wednesday, he made the Maryland rock bass record his own. The two Jenkins men were at a favorite fishing hole, a farm pond near their home where the senior Jenkins caught his record fish.
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SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | candy.thomson@baltsun.com | March 21, 2010
At 31⁄2 years old, Earl Jenkins IV likes to imitate his dad. And if that means setting a state fishing record — the one claimed by his father not quite a year ago — sorry, old man. The Thurmont youngster is an accomplished angler, reeling in his first smallmouth bass last summer and fishing with Earl Jenkins III every chance he gets. On Wednesday, he made the Maryland rock bass record his own. The two Jenkins men were at a favorite fishing hole, a farm pond near their home where the senior Jenkins caught his record fish.
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SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | June 8, 1993
Two drake mallards aborted their landing as we stepped out of the brush. Fry scattered through the shallows as we stepped into the river, and on the first cast a 6-inch rock bass, perhaps thinking itself a more formidable predator, banged a small popper and tail-walked for a second or two before shaking the hook.We were fishing the Patapsco River Friday morning, with the last of a light drizzle giving way to patches of sunshine. The area was not our first choice, but car trouble delayed us from departing for the Brunswick area of the Potomac, and we fell back on the section of the Patapsco at the foot of Johnnycake Road.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | May 13, 2001
Wednesday morning was overcast with a little light rain, but that didn't deter the regulars who fish from the Nicodemus Bridge over Liberty Reservoir. With the exception of an occasional passing car, the only sounds were birds and the old-timers reminiscing. "This is our home away from home," joked Gilbert Edwards, who caught a 15-inch trout and a nice-sized perch, which he promptly gave to his buddy Walter Bosley. "That's a meal," said Bosley, smiling. Edwards has been "fishing since the bridge was here.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1998
For Andy Grosko of Baltimore County, the second time around proved to be a charm earlier this week as he set a state record for rock bass while fishing Liberty Reservoir."
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | May 29, 1994
The temperature was headed toward 90 degrees, and so, as any other kid 25 years or more past adolescence might do, the way was made to the river, where wet wading would take the edge off the heat, and there was the promise of catching bass on the fly rod.The humidity was oppressive for so early in the season -- almost as if August had come a couple of months early.On the Patapsco below Johnnycake Road, the river was down, the riffles easy to wade, the slow runs and pools reasonably clear.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1999
Three Canada geese struggled to gain altitude as they lifted from a grassy patch atop a small, rocky island -- wings stroking powerfully while they rose on thermal currents over the river.Simultaneously, a woolly bugger drifted down a narrow chute of current and a smallmouth bass hit it like a freight train.OK, a model freight train. It was, after all, the Patapsco, where bass fishing is usually small scale compared with regional reservoirs and the upper Potomac and Susquehanna rivers.But the Patapsco, which runs some 30 miles north and west of Baltimore, is well-suited to a quick outing before or after work, and fly-fishing gear or light spinning tackle can put angling in the proper balance.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | May 13, 2001
Wednesday morning was overcast with a little light rain, but that didn't deter the regulars who fish from the Nicodemus Bridge over Liberty Reservoir. With the exception of an occasional passing car, the only sounds were birds and the old-timers reminiscing. "This is our home away from home," joked Gilbert Edwards, who caught a 15-inch trout and a nice-sized perch, which he promptly gave to his buddy Walter Bosley. "That's a meal," said Bosley, smiling. Edwards has been "fishing since the bridge was here.
NEWS
March 30, 2008
The boat-fishing season on Loch Raven Reservoir begins Friday and runs through the end of November, the Baltimore Department of Public Works has announced. The fishing season at Liberty and Prettyboy reservoirs began March 1 and continues until Dec. 31. Boating in the reservoirs requires a permit, which is $60 a season. People who apply for a permit will receive a "2008 Pocket Guide to Boating and Fishing," which public works officials say gives details about more than 40 species of fish in the reservoirs.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | July 5, 1992
Hunched over a small table in the sitting room of a 200-year-old stone town house in Ellicott City, on a bluff above the Patapsco River, Gene Barth was looking through a large magnifying glass and carefully wrapping black chenille toward the eye of a hook."
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1999
Three Canada geese struggled to gain altitude as they lifted from a grassy patch atop a small, rocky island -- wings stroking powerfully while they rose on thermal currents over the river.Simultaneously, a woolly bugger drifted down a narrow chute of current and a smallmouth bass hit it like a freight train.OK, a model freight train. It was, after all, the Patapsco, where bass fishing is usually small scale compared with regional reservoirs and the upper Potomac and Susquehanna rivers.But the Patapsco, which runs some 30 miles north and west of Baltimore, is well-suited to a quick outing before or after work, and fly-fishing gear or light spinning tackle can put angling in the proper balance.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1998
For Andy Grosko of Baltimore County, the second time around proved to be a charm earlier this week as he set a state record for rock bass while fishing Liberty Reservoir."
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | May 29, 1994
The temperature was headed toward 90 degrees, and so, as any other kid 25 years or more past adolescence might do, the way was made to the river, where wet wading would take the edge off the heat, and there was the promise of catching bass on the fly rod.The humidity was oppressive for so early in the season -- almost as if August had come a couple of months early.On the Patapsco below Johnnycake Road, the river was down, the riffles easy to wade, the slow runs and pools reasonably clear.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | June 8, 1993
Two drake mallards aborted their landing as we stepped out of the brush. Fry scattered through the shallows as we stepped into the river, and on the first cast a 6-inch rock bass, perhaps thinking itself a more formidable predator, banged a small popper and tail-walked for a second or two before shaking the hook.We were fishing the Patapsco River Friday morning, with the last of a light drizzle giving way to patches of sunshine. The area was not our first choice, but car trouble delayed us from departing for the Brunswick area of the Potomac, and we fell back on the section of the Patapsco at the foot of Johnnycake Road.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1997
For several weeks there have been reports of large numbers of croakers present in Tangier and Pocomoke sounds, although relatively few had been taken on hook and line.Now, however, according to catch reports from the Department of Natural Resources, the hardheads are on the bite, with anglers taking fish to 3 pounds in the sounds and from Hooper Island Straits.Best baits for croaker are pieces of soft crab or bloodworms, and areas of oyster rock or hard bottom close to sharp dropoffs are the best locations.
SPORTS
By Gary Diamond and Gary Diamond,Contributing Writer | November 1, 1992
With winter just around the corner, most fishermen are thinking seriously about stowing their fishing tackle until next March, a time when Deer Creek will be stocked with another batch of rainbow trout.Unfortunately, those individuals likely will spend the winter shoveling snow, watching reruns of old football games and developing a severe case of cabin fever, a dreaded disease that only affects recreational fishermen during the dead of winter.Most are unaware that some of the best cool-weather fishing of the season is just beginning.
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