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NEWS
June 11, 2006
Lisa Marie Rayner, Towson U. Graduate and Jonathan Roca, U. Delaware Graduate, were excited to exchange wedding vows on June 10th 2006 in the Harborfront Lighthouse garden in downtown Baltimore, MD.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | January 8, 2010
The Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Lab, near Laurel, is looking for a new director after its current chief, Richard T. Roca, announced Thursday that he is leaving. Roca, 65, took the APL post in January 2000 after a long career at AT&T, including as director of AT&T Labs in New Jersey, the company's research and development arm. APL scientists and engineers conduct research and development with a variety of partners, including the Navy and NASA. The laboratory is currently managing unmanned NASA missions to Mercury and Pluto.
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NEWS
June 23, 2006
On June 18, 2006, VICENTE F. ROCA, born in Odiongan, Romblon, Philippines and a resident of Glen Burnie, passed away at the age of 89. He is survived by his wife Carmelita and son Benjamin. He is also survived by his brothers, Juanito and Balbino and sisters, Leodegaria and Leonila, each with their own respective families. The family will receive visitors at Singleton Funeral Home, 1 Second Avenue SW (at Crain Hwy) Glen Burnie on Thursday, from 3 to 9 P.M. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held on Friday, at 1 P.M. at Holy Trinity Catholic Church.
NEWS
June 23, 2006
On June 18, 2006, VICENTE F. ROCA, born in Odiongan, Romblon, Philippines and a resident of Glen Burnie, passed away at the age of 89. He is survived by his wife Carmelita and son Benjamin. He is also survived by his brothers, Juanito and Balbino and sisters, Leodegaria and Leonila, each with their own respective families. The family will receive visitors at Singleton Funeral Home, 1 Second Avenue SW (at Crain Hwy) Glen Burnie on Thursday, from 3 to 9 P.M. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held on Friday, at 1 P.M. at Holy Trinity Catholic Church.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1999
AT&T Corp. executive Richard T. Roca has been named director of the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, the seventh head of the facility that dates to World War II.APL, south of Columbia, is the largest employer in Howard County."
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1999
AT&T Corp. executive Richard T. Roca has been named director of the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, the seventh head of the facility that dates to World War II.APL, south of Columbia, is the largest employer in Howard County."
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | January 6, 1994
DETROIT -- Renee Roca couldn't feel her left arm, the one that was wrapped in a cast from wrist to elbow, the one she broke just two hours earlier.So she skated. And smiled. A half-hour after leaving a hospital, she reached out and gently took the hand of her partner, Gorsha Sur, and glided on the ice, doing a rumba in a half-empty arena named after Joe Louis.No one could battle as hard as Roca, a 5-foot-4, 100-pound ice dancer wrapped in a black dress."I don't know if I can take one more thing," she would say later.
NEWS
By Jeff Seidel and Jeff Seidel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 21, 2004
The Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory has grown and changed since opening in 1942, but much of what it does remains the same. APL first began when the United States was in the midst of World War II, helping defend against the kamikaze air threat in the South Pacific. More than 60 years later, APL continues to work on security projects and in other areas. Based in Laurel, APL has 3,300 employees and annual funding of about $540 million. It performs about 79 percent of its work for the Department of Defense, with the additional 21 percent for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | February 16, 1995
International intrigue, congressional intervention, lost friendships, behind-the-scenes back-stabbing. Sounds right off the set of "All My Children," right?Wrong, but only if you haven't been paying attention to all the drama that has come to figure skating these days.For instance, the only things missing from the tale Jimmy Roberts will tell from the United States Figure Skating Championships Saturday during ABC's "Wide World of Sports" (Channel 2, 4:30 p.m.) are "Erica Kane," organ music and the dangling Friday plot twist that makes you tune in on Monday.
NEWS
May 17, 2006
Bolduc is chairman of hospice fundraiser J.P. Bolduc, chairman and chief executive officer of JPB Enterprises Inc. - a privately held holding company in Columbia that specializes in private equity investments, investment banking services and real estate development and investment - has agreed to serve as corporate chairman of Hospice of Howard County's annual fundraiser. The 21st Taste & Auction of Howard County is to be held Oct. 22 at Turf Valley Resort in Ellicott City. Bolduc, who founded JPB Enterprises in 1995, has served as CEO of W.R. Grace & Company and as assistant secretary for management and finance at the Department of Agriculture under Presidents Richard M. Nixon and Gerald R. Ford.
NEWS
June 11, 2006
Lisa Marie Rayner, Towson U. Graduate and Jonathan Roca, U. Delaware Graduate, were excited to exchange wedding vows on June 10th 2006 in the Harborfront Lighthouse garden in downtown Baltimore, MD.
NEWS
May 17, 2006
Bolduc is chairman of hospice fundraiser J.P. Bolduc, chairman and chief executive officer of JPB Enterprises Inc. - a privately held holding company in Columbia that specializes in private equity investments, investment banking services and real estate development and investment - has agreed to serve as corporate chairman of Hospice of Howard County's annual fundraiser. The 21st Taste & Auction of Howard County is to be held Oct. 22 at Turf Valley Resort in Ellicott City. Bolduc, who founded JPB Enterprises in 1995, has served as CEO of W.R. Grace & Company and as assistant secretary for management and finance at the Department of Agriculture under Presidents Richard M. Nixon and Gerald R. Ford.
NEWS
By Jeff Seidel and Jeff Seidel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 21, 2004
The Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory has grown and changed since opening in 1942, but much of what it does remains the same. APL first began when the United States was in the midst of World War II, helping defend against the kamikaze air threat in the South Pacific. More than 60 years later, APL continues to work on security projects and in other areas. Based in Laurel, APL has 3,300 employees and annual funding of about $540 million. It performs about 79 percent of its work for the Department of Defense, with the additional 21 percent for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
NEWS
By Ray Hogan and Ray Hogan,THE STAMFORD ADVOCATE | January 28, 2001
It's the middle of the afternoon, you've been at work more than five hours, and you can't seem to stay awake, let alone stop yawning or focus on your current task. For many Americans, this scenario is all too familiar. The reasons for such afternoon lulls range from the scientific to the obvious, from clinically diagnosed conditions to simply not having had enough sleep. For whatever reasons, they also seem more pronounced in the winter. They also can be overcome. "It's an inherent aspect of our sleep-wake cycle," says Dr. Dominic Roca, director of the Connecticut Center for Sleep Medicine in Stamford.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1999
AT&T Corp. executive Richard T. Roca has been named director of the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, the seventh head of the facility that dates to World War II.APL, south of Columbia, is the largest employer in Howard County."
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1999
AT&T Corp. executive Richard T. Roca has been named director of the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, the seventh head of the facility that dates to World War II.APL, south of Columbia, is the largest employer in Howard County."
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1999
Cuba sentenced four dissidents yesterday to up to five years in prison for speaking out against the government, an action that caused immediate condemnation from Cuban-American groups and is expected to increase tensions with the United States.As the Baltimore Orioles prepare for a March 28 exhibition game in Havana, Cuban-Americans opposing the trip used the sentencing as a reason the game should not be played. "The Cuban people will forever view your participation as collaborating with a regime that has tortured, imprisoned and murdered its citizens for speaking their minds, a right held sacred in America," stated an open letter to the Orioles signed yesterday by 32 Cuban-American groups.
NEWS
By Ray Hogan and Ray Hogan,THE STAMFORD ADVOCATE | January 28, 2001
It's the middle of the afternoon, you've been at work more than five hours, and you can't seem to stay awake, let alone stop yawning or focus on your current task. For many Americans, this scenario is all too familiar. The reasons for such afternoon lulls range from the scientific to the obvious, from clinically diagnosed conditions to simply not having had enough sleep. For whatever reasons, they also seem more pronounced in the winter. They also can be overcome. "It's an inherent aspect of our sleep-wake cycle," says Dr. Dominic Roca, director of the Connecticut Center for Sleep Medicine in Stamford.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1999
Cuba sentenced four dissidents yesterday to up to five years in prison for speaking out against the government, an action that caused immediate condemnation from Cuban-American groups and is expected to increase tensions with the United States.As the Baltimore Orioles prepare for a March 28 exhibition game in Havana, Cuban-Americans opposing the trip used the sentencing as a reason the game should not be played. "The Cuban people will forever view your participation as collaborating with a regime that has tortured, imprisoned and murdered its citizens for speaking their minds, a right held sacred in America," stated an open letter to the Orioles signed yesterday by 32 Cuban-American groups.
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