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By Sun Television Critic | May 10, 1994
Charles S. Dutton says he doesn't know if tonight's "Roc" will be the last original episode of the sitcom about the hard-working garbage man from Baltimore. But if it is, Dutton says he'll take consolation in the fact that "Roc" had a social conscience right to the end. And, because of that, Dutton believes the show made a difference during its three-year run on Fox."I was reluctant to do television in the beginning. But, when I agreed to do it, it was with the full understanding that I could do a show based on a foundation of reality -- a show that basically was a mixture of comedy and drama, that dealt with real issues," Dutton said in a telephone conversation from Los Angeles last week.
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By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
John Wood has a room filled with junk: steel pots, a wooden foot massager, heavy safe, TV antenna, plates, silver-plated brush, rolling pin, can opener, assorted gold-colored chains, lamps without shades, a New York Yankees baseball hat adorned in glitter. Everyone else's trash became his treasure, which came easily for Mr. Wood, who worked as a city sanitation worker for more than 35 years. He became one of the nation's most celebrated trash collectors, inspiring the television sitcom "Roc," but he also developed a reputation at home as an anchor for his Northeast Baltimore community.
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By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Sun Staff Writer | May 19, 1994
After a three-year run, "Roc," the dramatic comedy that has sometimes stirred up controversy for its realism, has been dropped from the Fox network's fall lineup.Network officials cited low ratings in canceling the show, which stars Baltimore native Charles S. Dutton. But Mr. Dutton said the reason for cancellation ran deeper than ratings."When a show like that can get treated the way it's been treated for three seasons -- and I can tell you now, with total disrespect. When a show like that can get axed so easily, that is very good proof that what little quality there is in television is reserved solely for white people," Mr. Dutton said Wednesday.
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By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2013
Baltimore actor Charles S. Dutton said the murder of John Wood, a retired city sanitation worker who was the inspiration behind the character Dutton played on the 1990s show “Roc,” was difficult to digest. “I wasn't expecting ever in a lifetime that John would go out that way,” Dutton told the Sun on Thursday. Wood, 80, was killed Monday after police said he was in argument that resulted with him taking a punch that caused Wood to fall back and hit his head on a concrete step, which killed him. Police on Wednesday charged Lorenzo Thornton, 25, with second-degree murder.
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By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2013
The 80-year-old man killed in Northeast Baltimore on Monday - after a punch caused him to fall and hit his head, police said - was the inspiration for the 1990s TV show "Roc. " John Wood formed the basis for the lead character on the Fox show portrayed by Baltimore actor Charles S. Dutton. Dutton grew up in Wood's neighborhood, and in the show portrayed a trash worker who believed in an honest day's work and went beyond his means to help his neighbors. Wood retired as a Baltimore sanitation worker after more than 35 years, his wife said.
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By Michael HIll | August 23, 1991
At last, Baltimore has a television series that's almost as good as the city itself.Fox's new "Roc," which gets a sneak preview Sunday night at 7:30 -- the pilot episode will be repeated on Thursday before the show settles into its 8:30 p.m. Sunday time slot -- has the same sort of solid-at-the-core, rough-around-the-edges appeal of the town in which it is set.Like Baltimore, it's warm and funny and genuine. It's missing those look-at-us, aren't-we-clever lines, the gratuitous jokes piled top of one another that are the sitcom equivalent of the phony glitz and glamour that's so refreshingly absent from this city.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | August 29, 1991
On The Weekend Watch:ONE MORE TIME -- If you missed Sunday's premiere of the Baltimore-born series "Roc" -- and the ratings show a lot of people did -- the promising show with former Maryland Penitentiary inmate Charles Dutton as a city trash collector is on again tonight. The premiere episode is repeated at 8:30 on Channel 45, before the show takes up its regularly scheduled slot at 8:30 p.m. on Sunday.TALKING WITH BURT -- Actor Burt Reynolds, whose ad-libbed acceptance speech (for best comedy actor)
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By LAURA CHARLES | November 10, 1991
THE RETURN OF THE NATIVE SON: Tickets are still available to see Baltimore native Charles "Roc" Dutton perform tonight at his alma mater -- Towson State University.The current star of Fox Broadcasting's "Roc," Dutton's performance is being staged at TSU's Fine Arts Center's Mainstage Theatre and is called "Classic Entertainment: An Evening of Shakespeare with Charles S. Dutton."Entertainment Tonight, CNN and Black Entertainment TV have expressed interest in covering Dutton's performance, which is a fund-raiser to establish an endowment for minority theater students.
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By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
John Wood has a room filled with junk: steel pots, a wooden foot massager, heavy safe, TV antenna, plates, silver-plated brush, rolling pin, can opener, assorted gold-colored chains, lamps without shades, a New York Yankees baseball hat adorned in glitter. Everyone else's trash became his treasure, which came easily for Mr. Wood, who worked as a city sanitation worker for more than 35 years. He became one of the nation's most celebrated trash collectors, inspiring the television sitcom "Roc," but he also developed a reputation at home as an anchor for his Northeast Baltimore community.
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By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | July 19, 1991
YOU WOULD think nothing would faze Charles Dutton, not after he's made the long journey from Baltimore's Latrobe projects to the Maryland Penitentiary to the Broadway stage. But this acclaimed, Tony-nominated star of August Wilson's Pulitzer prize-winning play "The Piano Lesson" admits that he's nervous about his latest step into prime time.Dutton, 40, is the title character in "Roc," a new show for Fox that will premiere in late August. He plays a hard-working garbage man, married to an equally hard-working nurse, who lives in a Baltimore rowhouse and put up with his crotchety Malcolm X fan of a father and his con man of a brother.
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By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2013
The 80-year-old man killed in Northeast Baltimore on Monday - after a punch caused him to fall and hit his head, police said - was the inspiration for the 1990s TV show "Roc. " John Wood formed the basis for the lead character on the Fox show portrayed by Baltimore actor Charles S. Dutton. Dutton grew up in Wood's neighborhood, and in the show portrayed a trash worker who believed in an honest day's work and went beyond his means to help his neighbors. Wood retired as a Baltimore sanitation worker after more than 35 years, his wife said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
Baltimore's own Charles S. Dutton, star of screens big ("Gothika") and small (Fox sitcom "Roc"), Emmy winner for directing HBO's "The Corner," returns to movie theaters this weekend with "Least Among Saints. " The film, from writer-director-star Martin Papazian, centers on an emotionally scarred war veteran suddenly having to play father-figure to an orphaned boy. Dutton, who said he remembers many friends who returned from Vietnam with emotional issues they never seemed able to stare down, plays a police officer sympathetic to the vet's plight.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2011
J. Cole shocked a lot of industry heads and rap fans with the release of "Cole World: The Sideline Story," the debut LP he mostly produced himself. It hit No. 1 on Billboard its first week, and since hitting shelves Sept. 27, the album has sold more than 300,000 copies. He has no major singles or high-profile cameos; Cole merely built a following from the ground-up, with strong mixtapes and opening tour slots. Consider his show Thursday night at Baltimore Soundstage part of the earned victory lap. Cole is the type of rapper capable of writing radio-friendly hits ("Can't Get Enough" feat.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | June 12, 2009
Ramin Bahrani's Goodbye Solo is the best in a stream of new independent movies, including Kelly Reichardt's Old Joy, that bring feature films the intimate focus and sneaky power of regionally flavored short stories - the sort you'd find in a first-class magazine such as Oxford American. It's intelligent and emotional, not studied or sappy. Bahrani wrings honest humor and meaning from a two-character tale. The movie is about farewells and flying solo. It's also about the mistake of treating a certain span of life as a bye week in a sports season.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | April 5, 2007
Roc Raida remembers being a young DJ in the early '90s. The Harlem-raised musician made a name for himself by entering New York City DJ battles, where competitors try to one-up each other by scratching on turntables. Now, Raida, who won the renowned DMC World DJ Championship in 1995, is sponsoring his own touring contest. The event, called the Gong DJ Battle, spotlights local talent in cities across the globe. It comes to Sonar tonight. "It's good because I remember I was just like that," Raida said.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun Reporter | December 28, 2006
This article was published yesterday in some early copies of The Sun but was replaced in later editions by former President Gerald R. Ford's obituary. We are reprinting it today for all Sun readers. CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C. --Oblivious to the Washington debate over what to do with Iraq, a clutch of Marines in damp flak vests and helmets kneel in the chilly dark, headlamps shining on notebooks where they are carefully printing K-Roc's instructions for their next mission. Like most of his squad, K-Roc, the slender Lance Cpl. Adam Koczrowski, is barely out of his teens.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | November 26, 1991
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* When actor Charles "Roc" Dutton was released from the Maryland Penitentiary in 1976, he went on to study acting at Towson State University. And now Dutton and the producers of his Fox Network series "Roc" are aiding other promising minority actors at the Towson campus.At his TSU performance earlier this month in "An Evening of Shakespeare," Dutton said the proceeds would help establish the Charles S. Dutton Theatre Scholarship Endowment for Minority Students. And subsequently, the HBO cable network, producer of the show, has made a commitment to fund the balance of the scholarship in full, according to the university.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | July 20, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Fox will officially launch its new fall season next month with "Cops" and the live premiere of "Roc," it was announced yesterday.Fox Entertainment President Peter Chernin said the early start of several Fox shows will help the network avoid the "clutter" when more than two dozen new shows debut on the other three networks in September."
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,SUN REPORTER | December 27, 2006
CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C.-- --Oblivious to the Washington debate over what to do with Iraq, a clutch of Marines in damp flak vests and helmets kneel in the chilly dark, headlamps shining on notebooks where they are carefully printing K-Roc's instructions for their next mission. Like most of his squad, K-Roc, the slender Lance Cpl. Adam Koczrowski, is barely out of his teens. He and many of his guys are veterans of one or two tours in Iraq where their unit, Charlie Company, has lost 22 dead. They got back from Iraq in May, and they're about ready to go again.
SPORTS
By Eric Rhew and Eric Rhew,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 23, 2004
SEATTLE - Attackman Mark Millon scored four goals, including the first two-point tally of his Major League Lacrosse career, to lead the Baltimore Bayhawks to a season-opening 24-18 victory over the Rochester Rattlers in front of 9,136 at Seahawks Stadium last night. Led by Millon, the Bayhawks' offense ignited for 19 goals, including five two-point markers, which tied the MLL record. Boston had scored five two-pointers against Bridgeport on July 27, 2002. Millon teamed up with midfielder Gary Gait to give Baltimore a quick 2-0 lead in the first 1:50 of the game.
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