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By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,Sun Staff Writer | September 14, 1995
Lucia St. Clair Robson, a writer of historical fiction, hates it when people assume she's a romance novelist."When you're a woman and you write something like this, they say it's a romance," said Ms. Robson, 52, of Arnold. "They tend to be dismissive about it."Ms. Robson's writing skill and popularity cannot be ignored quite so easily. Hardcover copies of her fifth book, "Mary's Land," will hit the bookstores Tuesday. The novel describes the lives of two women -- one real, one fictional -- in Colonial Maryland.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | February 12, 2014
The Baltimore Sun Sister Mary Jacinta Robson, a retired medical technologist who spent six decades at Mercy Medical Center, died there of congestive heart failure Feb. 7. She was 88. "She had been a beloved presence at the hospital for over 60 years and worked in the microbiology department for decades, and in later years was a hospital volunteer," said Sister Irene Callahan, a fellow member of Sisters of Mercy. Born Clara Jane Robson in Baltimore and raised on Ridgewood Avenue, she was the daughter of Alonzo Robson, a clerk, and Goldie Updegraff Robson, a homemaker.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGLES TIMES | May 6, 2005
SANTA MARIA, Calif. - Two men, who the prosecution maintains had inappropriate childhood friendships with Michael Jackson, testified yesterday that they were never molested or touched improperly by the pop star. Wade J. Robson, 22, was the first witness after Superior Court Judge Rodney S. Melville rejected defense motions to acquit Jackson of molestation and conspiracy charges. Robson was followed on the stand by fellow Australian Brett C. Barnes. Robson denied he ever took a shower with Jackson.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
A former Howard County fire officer is suing in federal court to get his job back, alleging that the county violated his rights by firing him for personal Facebook discussions about gun control, free speech and "liberal" politics. Former Battalion Chief Kevin P. Buker, who worked for the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue Services from 1997 until he was let go in March, contends that the county violated his First Amendment rights by prohibiting speech on public issues that did not interfere with his job performance.
NEWS
By Sally Connell and Michael Muskal and Sally Connell and Michael Muskal,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 7, 2005
SANTA MARIA, Calif. - Two mothers of boys who were "special friends" of Michael Jackson said yesterday that they had no qualms about letting their sons sleep in the same bed with the singer because they trusted the pop star as they would a relative. Joy Robson, the mother of Wade Robson, 22, was the first in a parade of relatives brought by the defense to deny that they ever saw anything inappropriate during visits to Jackson's Neverland ranch in the early 1990s. Joy Robson's daughter, Chantal, and Marie Lizbeth Barnes, mother of another boyhood friend of Jackson, also testified, as did Barnes' daughter, Karlee.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2011
Lucia St. Clair Robson's first and biggest selling novel opens with an Indian raid on a small settler outpost in 1830s East Texas — page after page of killing, scalping, torture, bondage and rape during which the 9-year-old female protagonist is carried off by the Comanches. Robson has since written about the American Revolution, and further war and occasionally other massacres in the American West, in Florida, Mexico and feudal Japan. And yet, nearly 30 years and nine published novels later, the Arnold resident is somewhat puzzled to find herself often grouped with writers of "women's novels," and even "romance novels," although she means no disrespect to these categories.
NEWS
By Michael R. Driscoll and Michael R. Driscoll,Staff writer | January 18, 1991
Readers who pick up Arnold-based Lucia St. Clair Robson's new book, "The Tokaido Road," expecting to find a distaff version of James Clavell's "Shogun" are going to be disappointed.But readers with the patience and insight to see the story unfold with a clear eye can look forward to an enthralling experience.To be published at $19.95 by Ballentine Books, "The Tokaido Road"should be released between mid-February and March 1.Part sociology, part travelogue and part adventure, the novel provides an interesting perspective on the Japanese culture of the period.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
A former Howard County fire officer is suing in federal court to get his job back, alleging that the county violated his rights by firing him for personal Facebook discussions about gun control, free speech and "liberal" politics. Former Battalion Chief Kevin P. Buker, who worked for the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue Services from 1997 until he was let go in March, contends that the county violated his First Amendment rights by prohibiting speech on public issues that did not interfere with his job performance.
NEWS
By Dan Fespermanand Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Dan Fespermanand Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Sun Staff Correspondents | April 2, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Treasury Department painted a "scarlet letter" of complicity yesterday onto 52 businesses and 37 individuals said to be part of a secret Iraqi network for worldwide arms dealing and investing. But the broad-brush labeling may have spattered some companies that have done nothing illegal, Treasury officials conceded.In announcing the list, which included only two U.S. companies and no American residents, Deputy Treasury Secretary John E. Robson said, "Over the last decade, Saddam [Hussein]
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson | December 5, 1999
IT WASN'T long ago that investors turned their backs on Japan.Who could blame them? The world's second-largest economy was mired in recession, its banking system foundered with billions in bad loans, and the Japanese government seemed apathetic to taking steps to pull the country from its morass.Many of the problems still exist, but investors, who have held fast to mutual funds that invest in the country, are suddenly finding themselves far richer.The reason? Japan as an investment has suddenly gotten hot. Funds that invest in Japan are up 104.72 percent as of Nov. 26, according to Lipper Inc., a New York-based firm that tracks the performance of mutual funds.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2011
Lucia St. Clair Robson's first and biggest selling novel opens with an Indian raid on a small settler outpost in 1830s East Texas — page after page of killing, scalping, torture, bondage and rape during which the 9-year-old female protagonist is carried off by the Comanches. Robson has since written about the American Revolution, and further war and occasionally other massacres in the American West, in Florida, Mexico and feudal Japan. And yet, nearly 30 years and nine published novels later, the Arnold resident is somewhat puzzled to find herself often grouped with writers of "women's novels," and even "romance novels," although she means no disrespect to these categories.
NEWS
By Sally Connell and Michael Muskal and Sally Connell and Michael Muskal,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 7, 2005
SANTA MARIA, Calif. - Two mothers of boys who were "special friends" of Michael Jackson said yesterday that they had no qualms about letting their sons sleep in the same bed with the singer because they trusted the pop star as they would a relative. Joy Robson, the mother of Wade Robson, 22, was the first in a parade of relatives brought by the defense to deny that they ever saw anything inappropriate during visits to Jackson's Neverland ranch in the early 1990s. Joy Robson's daughter, Chantal, and Marie Lizbeth Barnes, mother of another boyhood friend of Jackson, also testified, as did Barnes' daughter, Karlee.
NEWS
By LOS ANGLES TIMES | May 6, 2005
SANTA MARIA, Calif. - Two men, who the prosecution maintains had inappropriate childhood friendships with Michael Jackson, testified yesterday that they were never molested or touched improperly by the pop star. Wade J. Robson, 22, was the first witness after Superior Court Judge Rodney S. Melville rejected defense motions to acquit Jackson of molestation and conspiracy charges. Robson was followed on the stand by fellow Australian Brett C. Barnes. Robson denied he ever took a shower with Jackson.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and By James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | July 14, 2002
Summertime and the readin' is easy Among history's freedom fighters, Lucia St. Clair Robson of Annapolis bids us not to forget the Apaches. In her new novel, Ghost Warrior (Forge, 749 pages, $27.95), she arms us and mounts us for one more raid on the Pale Eyes moving into the ancestral southwestern homeland, in the later 1800s. We know very well who's going to win in the end; but watching the evil deeds of Mexicans on the lower side of an invisible boundary and the imbecilities of U.S. military commanders on the upper side, we flinch.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson | December 5, 1999
IT WASN'T long ago that investors turned their backs on Japan.Who could blame them? The world's second-largest economy was mired in recession, its banking system foundered with billions in bad loans, and the Japanese government seemed apathetic to taking steps to pull the country from its morass.Many of the problems still exist, but investors, who have held fast to mutual funds that invest in the country, are suddenly finding themselves far richer.The reason? Japan as an investment has suddenly gotten hot. Funds that invest in Japan are up 104.72 percent as of Nov. 26, according to Lipper Inc., a New York-based firm that tracks the performance of mutual funds.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,Sun Staff Writer | September 14, 1995
Lucia St. Clair Robson, a writer of historical fiction, hates it when people assume she's a romance novelist."When you're a woman and you write something like this, they say it's a romance," said Ms. Robson, 52, of Arnold. "They tend to be dismissive about it."Ms. Robson's writing skill and popularity cannot be ignored quite so easily. Hardcover copies of her fifth book, "Mary's Land," will hit the bookstores Tuesday. The novel describes the lives of two women -- one real, one fictional -- in Colonial Maryland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and By James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | July 14, 2002
Summertime and the readin' is easy Among history's freedom fighters, Lucia St. Clair Robson of Annapolis bids us not to forget the Apaches. In her new novel, Ghost Warrior (Forge, 749 pages, $27.95), she arms us and mounts us for one more raid on the Pale Eyes moving into the ancestral southwestern homeland, in the later 1800s. We know very well who's going to win in the end; but watching the evil deeds of Mexicans on the lower side of an invisible boundary and the imbecilities of U.S. military commanders on the upper side, we flinch.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | February 12, 2014
The Baltimore Sun Sister Mary Jacinta Robson, a retired medical technologist who spent six decades at Mercy Medical Center, died there of congestive heart failure Feb. 7. She was 88. "She had been a beloved presence at the hospital for over 60 years and worked in the microbiology department for decades, and in later years was a hospital volunteer," said Sister Irene Callahan, a fellow member of Sisters of Mercy. Born Clara Jane Robson in Baltimore and raised on Ridgewood Avenue, she was the daughter of Alonzo Robson, a clerk, and Goldie Updegraff Robson, a homemaker.
NEWS
By Dan Fespermanand Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Dan Fespermanand Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Sun Staff Correspondents | April 2, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Treasury Department painted a "scarlet letter" of complicity yesterday onto 52 businesses and 37 individuals said to be part of a secret Iraqi network for worldwide arms dealing and investing. But the broad-brush labeling may have spattered some companies that have done nothing illegal, Treasury officials conceded.In announcing the list, which included only two U.S. companies and no American residents, Deputy Treasury Secretary John E. Robson said, "Over the last decade, Saddam [Hussein]
NEWS
By Michael R. Driscoll and Michael R. Driscoll,Staff writer | January 18, 1991
Readers who pick up Arnold-based Lucia St. Clair Robson's new book, "The Tokaido Road," expecting to find a distaff version of James Clavell's "Shogun" are going to be disappointed.But readers with the patience and insight to see the story unfold with a clear eye can look forward to an enthralling experience.To be published at $19.95 by Ballentine Books, "The Tokaido Road"should be released between mid-February and March 1.Part sociology, part travelogue and part adventure, the novel provides an interesting perspective on the Japanese culture of the period.
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