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By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2012
Baltimore's Afro-American newspaper has a rich photo archive - 1.5 million images dating from the Depression, World War II and the civil rights era up to today. But one of the nation's oldest African-American newspapers didn't have the hundreds of thousands of dollars needed to digitize its historic images for the Internet age. Now, thanks to a little robot built by a former Johns Hopkins student, the effort has gotten a lot cheaper. Using off-the-shelf electronics, Thomas Smith, a 2011 Hopkins graduate, built Gado, a swiveling, motorized arm with a nozzle that uses vacuum suction to "grab" photos and place them on a scanner.
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By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
The robotic fish kept alone in a tank at the University of Maryland, College Park doesn't dazzle with its agility or speed, but it does promise bigger things to come. At the flick of a switch, water flows through the tank. The faceless gray plastic creature less than a foot long knows this, and you know that it knows this because it slides languidly from side to side to shelter behind a white plastic pipe, minimizing its energy use. The robot cannot see the pipe, but it can feel it. It may not look like much, but this is progress for associate professor Derek A. Paley, his College Park research team and partners at Bowling Green State and Michigan State universities, who have been working on the hardware, mathematical calculations and computer program for a couple of years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2013
For no particular reason, except to add a bit of laughter to this sad, sorry world, Midweek Madness has gone back to the treasure trove known as Scopitones and resurrected a bizarre ditty from The Tornados called "The Robot. " And you thought you knew how to throw a fun picnic.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2014
Antonio Harrell signed up to design and build competition robots at Dunbar High School because, he says, he "didn't have anything else to do. " Three years later, the 18-year-old senior has gotten so good at engineering robots, he's teaching Baltimore's business leaders how to use them. "He did a great job. Well, he did better than I expected he would do," Harrell said Sunday after Eliot Pearson, AOL's principal software engineer, finished operating a robot Harrell and two other Dunbar students built.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | July 10, 1997
BOSTON -- Next thing you know they'll be making a Beanie Baby named Sojourner.I mean, the country has had a romance with space before, but this is the first time we've found a NASA space traveler quite so, well, adorable. Ever since the 2-foot-long, 1-foot-high, 23-pound robot rolled out of its air bags and onto the rusty Martian soil, it's become a national mascot.The scientists are so excited that one described himself as in ''hog heaven,'' though that may be an insult to the real thing.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane and Gregory P. Kane,Sun Staff Writer | June 9, 1995
The robot that helped police end a siege at a Linthicum motel Tuesday afternoon probably saved the life of the man who Anne Arundel County police believed had a bomb in his room.The suspect was huddled under a sink in the bathroom. C. Mark Van Baalen, the deputy state fire marshal who operated the robot, could see him -- courtesy of two video cameras attached to the robot and a 9-inch television screen in front of him."He reached up and grabbed something off the sink and then got back under the blankets," said Mr. Van Baalen, a balding, red-haired man of 35.When the suspect pointed the object toward the door, tactical police assumed the worst: that it was a gun. Had they stormed the room, they may have shot the suspect, Mr. Van Baalen said.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby | March 15, 1991
It looks like a giant metallic beetle or maybe Star Wars' R2D2 after a diet, but the $337 million space robot being built by Martin Marietta Corp. is expected to become America's first full-time construction worker in space.The 6-foot, one-legged, two-armed mechanical creature is being designed and built by engineers at Martin's Aerospace Division in Denver and is to be used in the construction of the Space Station Freedom sometime later this decade.One big advantage the robot will have over other space station construction workers or crew members is that it will have "eyes," or video cameras, on each of its wrists as well as at the top of its oblong body.
NEWS
January 2, 1993
GREENBELT -- A spidery robot named Dante began inching its way down into an Antarctic volcano yesterday in a daring New Year's display of technology delayed earlier by cold weather and an unexpected eruption.But a computer glitch at the project's base camp brought Dante to a halt after the vehicle had traveled only about 21 feet. The setback dampened the initial excitement over the descent."Everybody watching it here is real excited," said Randee Exler, a spokeswoman at the Goddard Space Flight Center where scientists gathered to watch TV pictures transmitted by the robot.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | November 19, 1992
A robot that enables people to take a load off their feet could benefit victims of hip fractures, spinal disorders or back injuries as they rediscover the art of walking.Although it is being used at 40 nursing homes, hospitals and rehabilitation hospitals in Japan, a model now in place at the Bennett Institute for Sports Medicine at Children's Hospital is the first to be tried in the United States.Research on 20 patients will soon be conducted by Johns Hopkins researchers working at a biomechanics laboratory at Bennett.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby | June 7, 1991
For the dangerous job of cleaning up the radioactive waste from the production of weapons, the nuclear industry has turned to T-REX, a robot being developed by Martin Marietta Corp. in Middle River.While T-REX (Teleoperated Robotic Excavator) may look a lot like the excavators used by highway construction contractors, any similarities end there.T-REX is strong enough to crush a bowling ball, Al Kamhi, Martin spokesman, said. But unlike its construction industry look-alike, "it has to have the delicate touch to pick up an egg without cracking the shell," he said.
NEWS
By Barbara Pash | March 25, 2014
When he was younger, Arman Farazdaghi played with Legos. "I designed things that didn't work. I thought, I'll design something that works," said Arman, a 12-year-old seventh-grader who created the software program that operated a robot for the robotics club at Ridgely Middle School. "I started building things when I was a kid — a chest, a wagon. I like designing and building," said Cindy Jia, 11, a sixth-grader who helped to design and build the robot. "Before joining the robotics club, I designed one robot from parts I ordered online," said seventh-grader Noah Zipin, 13, and a team leader.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | February 25, 2014
Hyperchutzpahism is a condition in which an overactive chutzpah gland produces an excessive amount of chutzpah, causing people to be extremely audacious, if not obnoxious, and to cut in line at TCBY. The word, which I just made up, is taken from the Greek (hyper, for overly) and the Yiddish (chutzpah, for boldness or self-confidence.) I'm not a doctor, but I think this is what afflicts Julius Henson, the political operative - hyperchutzpahism. He can't help himself. He's chutzpadik, and not in a good way. Henson was convicted, jailed and fined for his role in the infamous "relax robocall" to suppress votes in the 2010 Maryland general election.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | December 9, 2013
After you heard President Obama's call for a hike in the minimum wage, you probably wondered the same thing I did: Was Obama sent from the future by Skynet to prepare humanity for its ultimate dominion by robots? But just in case the question didn't occur to you, let me explain. On Tuesday, the day before Obama called for an increase in the minimum wage, the restaurant chain Applebee's announced that it will install iPad-like tablets at every table. Chili's already made this move earlier this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
Janell Sutherland and For The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
Previously on "The Amazing Race," there were so many teams! And they were so happy! Until Phil sent most of them home. Last week, Leo and Jamal came in last place. Tonight, we find out who wins. Here's the part where I tell you that my professional recapping skills failed me. My Tivo did not record! I was lollygagging around my house, fixing school lunches, talking on the phone, planning vacations, giving myself a delayed start so that I could skip all the commercials. I turned on my TV about thirty minutes into the episode only to discover my worst nightmare.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2013
"Robotic parking" might conjure up images of a far-off future. Wes Guckert is trying to make it a lot more common now. Also known as automated parking garages, such facilities are the vehicle version of a high-tech warehouse: Hydraulic lifters "park" the cars, requiring smaller spaces and allowing drivers to skip the step of circling around in search of a spot. Guckert — CEO of The Traffic Group, a White Marsh firm that provides traffic studies and other transportation services — is a robotic-parking evangelist, promoting the concept in presentations around the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2013
For no particular reason, except to add a bit of laughter to this sad, sorry world, Midweek Madness has gone back to the treasure trove known as Scopitones and resurrected a bizarre ditty from The Tornados called "The Robot. " And you thought you knew how to throw a fun picnic.
NEWS
By Lesa Jansen and Lesa Jansen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 2, 2002
BY DAY HE'S a mild-mannered dad who works as an engineer. But by night, Mount Airy resident Rob Everhart works tirelessly in his garage, creating one of the most menacing, dangerous creatures on two tank treads: Atomic Wedgie. The robotic gladiator begins its fifth season of competition this month on the cable TV show BattleBots, which is co-hosted by Carmen Electra on Comedy Central. The show pits robots against one another in battles to the death - or, rather, electronic failure. "It just kind of started as a lark as I was flipping channels one day and saw the show," said Everhart.
BUSINESS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | June 12, 1991
A high-tech robot developed by Martin Marietta Corp. i Baltimore for loading weapons and spying on the enemy on battlefields is getting a tryout in a non-military job: handling radioactive waste.A prototype of the Teleoperated Robotic Excavator -- T-Rex to friends -- will be tested at a federal nuclear laboratory. If it passes, the machine could be used to excavate and move barrels of nuclear waste buried at Idaho Falls, Idaho.Moreover, cousins of T-Rex could find themselves employed in a wide range of jobs handling hazardous material, says Charles Manor, spokesman for Martin Marietta.
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2013
Robo Raven is making aviation history - again. The robotic bird's maiden flights in December were a first in the history of flying machines, but lasted only seconds inside the Reckord Armory at the University of Maryland, College Park. Now the mylar and carbon fiber contraption is back, soaring higher, longer and more accurately - the first machine ever built that flies on wings that can move independently of each other, as real birds' do. "Nobody has flown anything with independent wing control," before, said S.K. Gupta, a professor of mechanical engineering in the A. James Clark School of Engineering at College Park.
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2013
One night in 1999, a rash of frightening sensations hit Paul Titus all at once. His left arm went numb. His left eye began twitching. He couldn't speak without slurring. Unaware what the symptoms meant, he was slow to call for help. When his ischemic stroke was finally over, he was paralyzed on his left side and for 14 years he needed a leg brace and cane just to stay upright. One morning last week, Titus smiled as he loped along on a treadmill in a makeshift gym. A high-tech, brace-like device wrapped his left ankle, monitoring his gait 200 times per second and supplying energy boosts as needed.
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