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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 3, 1991
Whatever Imabelle wants, Imabelle gets.No man could deny Imabelle her druthers.She's poured into that hourglass red dress like hydraulic fluid under 10,000 pounds of pressure p.s.i. Hubba-hubba and va-vooom.Robin Givens, who plays Imabelle, laughs."I just kind of went for it," she says.The role, in "A Rage in Harlem," may make the television actress a major motion picture star. She's already gotten an el-ravo plug from Liz Smith and great reviews all around the country.The film, in fact, has been chosen for competition in the Cannes Film Festival, and Givens will be in attendance.
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NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | February 16, 2007
The successor to Julius Caesar and Pope Gregory XIII in the great pantheon of calendar-tinkerers has emerged in Baltimore: Sheila Dixon. Per mayoral decree, yesterday, Feb. 15, was Valentine's Day in Charm City. And by the powers vested in City Hall's second floor, it will remain Valentine's Day through Sunday. "We're going to keep the love alive a few extra days," declared Dixon, decked out in a bright red dress and surrounded by heart-shaped balloons, fancy pastries and enough flowers to make City Hall smell like a funeral parlor.
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FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | May 3, 1991
"A Rage in Harlem'' is an uneven combination of comedy and carnage. When it's good, it's very good. When it's not, it's simply bloody.The film, whose title is slightly misleading, begins on a harsh note, survives that, and for the next hour or so, is sound, broad comedy. Unfortunately, as the movie closes it becomes ugly again, destroying the mood and ending on a less than satisfactory note.''A Rage in Harlem'' begins in 1956 in a small southern town. There is a shootout between blacks who have stolen some gold, and whites, who had planned to betray the blacks and take the gold.
FEATURES
December 1, 1997
A Christmas classic dating from when LBJ was in the White House has its umpteenth airing on CBS tonight."Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13), television's longest-running special, tells of the reindeer with a very shiny nose. Burl Ives narrates the charming holiday perennial, first shown on CBS in 1972 after an eight-year run on NBC. Johnny Marks composed eight songs, including the title tune and "Holly Jolly Christmas."At a glance"Touched by a Dolphin" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2)
FEATURES
December 1, 1997
A Christmas classic dating from when LBJ was in the White House has its umpteenth airing on CBS tonight."Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13), television's longest-running special, tells of the reindeer with a very shiny nose. Burl Ives narrates the charming holiday perennial, first shown on CBS in 1972 after an eight-year run on NBC. Johnny Marks composed eight songs, including the title tune and "Holly Jolly Christmas."At a glance"Touched by a Dolphin" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 3, 1991
'A Rage in Harlem'Starring Forest Whitaker and Robin Givens.Directed by Bill Duke.Released by Miramax.Rated R.** 1/2 Crude and energetic, Bill Duke's "A Rage in Harlem" recalls the somewhat ambivalent days of the early '70s when, however briefly and for whatever motivation, black culture moved to the center of American film culture in the violent urban genre known generally as "blaxploitation.""A Rage in Harlem," of course, has a tonier pedigree than "Above 125th" or "Skipchaser" or any of the works of Jim Brown, Fred Williamson, Richard Roundtree or Isaac Hayes; it has a literary antecedent, sharing the best of the blaxploitation pictures' derivation from the works of Chester Himes, a novelist who exiled himself to Paris where he wrote vibrant police procedurals set in Harlem and featuring two tough cops, Coffin Ed Johnson and Gravedigger Jones.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | February 16, 2007
The successor to Julius Caesar and Pope Gregory XIII in the great pantheon of calendar-tinkerers has emerged in Baltimore: Sheila Dixon. Per mayoral decree, yesterday, Feb. 15, was Valentine's Day in Charm City. And by the powers vested in City Hall's second floor, it will remain Valentine's Day through Sunday. "We're going to keep the love alive a few extra days," declared Dixon, decked out in a bright red dress and surrounded by heart-shaped balloons, fancy pastries and enough flowers to make City Hall smell like a funeral parlor.
NEWS
By Bob Herbert | June 14, 1995
IN SOME communities a convicted sex offender can expect to be ostracized. But if the offender is a former heavyweight boxing champion and the community is Harlem, he can look forward to a gala welcome-home celebration.A so-called "welcoming committee" was formed to take part in a program at the Apollo Theater next Tuesday for the famous rapist, bully and longtime tormentor of women -- Mike Tyson. Among those listed as members of the committee were Rep. Charles Rangel; the former Manhattan borough president and chairman emeritus of Inner City Broadcasting, Percy Sutton; Assemblyman Al Vann; the singer Roberta Flack and the Rev. Al Sharpton.
SPORTS
By E.R. Shipp and E.R. Shipp,Knight-Ridder News ServiceNew York Times News Service | January 31, 1992
INDIANAPOLIS -- The 18-year-old woman who has accused Mike Tyson of raping her last July took the stand yesterday and described what she said was a dream come true that turned into a horrifying assault in which the former heavyweight champion repeatedly warned: "Don't fight me. Don't fight me."The attack, she said, caused her "excruciating pain," and, when she wept, "he started laughing like it was a game . . . like it was funny."For nearly 3 1/2 hours, the woman told of joining Tyson for what she thought would be a late-night ride in the limousine of a superstar who her brother, father and grandfather had idolized, with perhaps a chance to meet other celebrities at parties going on in the city during a cultural festival.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | May 2, 1991
* ''One Good Cop'' A New York cop wants to adopt the three daughters of his partner who is killed in the line of duty. Michael Keaton and Anthony La Paglia star. Drama, comedy.* ''A Rage in Harlem'' A girl entrusted with a suitcase full of hot gold goes to Harlem, where everybody wants her and the gold. Gregory Hines and Robin Givens are in the cast. Comedy, drama.* ''Rich Girl'' A wealthy young woman gets a job in a club where she falls in love with the lead singer in the house band. Jill Schoelen and Don Michael Paul star.
NEWS
By Bob Herbert | June 14, 1995
IN SOME communities a convicted sex offender can expect to be ostracized. But if the offender is a former heavyweight boxing champion and the community is Harlem, he can look forward to a gala welcome-home celebration.A so-called "welcoming committee" was formed to take part in a program at the Apollo Theater next Tuesday for the famous rapist, bully and longtime tormentor of women -- Mike Tyson. Among those listed as members of the committee were Rep. Charles Rangel; the former Manhattan borough president and chairman emeritus of Inner City Broadcasting, Percy Sutton; Assemblyman Al Vann; the singer Roberta Flack and the Rev. Al Sharpton.
SPORTS
By E.R. Shipp and E.R. Shipp,Knight-Ridder News ServiceNew York Times News Service | January 31, 1992
INDIANAPOLIS -- The 18-year-old woman who has accused Mike Tyson of raping her last July took the stand yesterday and described what she said was a dream come true that turned into a horrifying assault in which the former heavyweight champion repeatedly warned: "Don't fight me. Don't fight me."The attack, she said, caused her "excruciating pain," and, when she wept, "he started laughing like it was a game . . . like it was funny."For nearly 3 1/2 hours, the woman told of joining Tyson for what she thought would be a late-night ride in the limousine of a superstar who her brother, father and grandfather had idolized, with perhaps a chance to meet other celebrities at parties going on in the city during a cultural festival.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | May 3, 1991
"A Rage in Harlem'' is an uneven combination of comedy and carnage. When it's good, it's very good. When it's not, it's simply bloody.The film, whose title is slightly misleading, begins on a harsh note, survives that, and for the next hour or so, is sound, broad comedy. Unfortunately, as the movie closes it becomes ugly again, destroying the mood and ending on a less than satisfactory note.''A Rage in Harlem'' begins in 1956 in a small southern town. There is a shootout between blacks who have stolen some gold, and whites, who had planned to betray the blacks and take the gold.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 3, 1991
'A Rage in Harlem'Starring Forest Whitaker and Robin Givens.Directed by Bill Duke.Released by Miramax.Rated R.** 1/2 Crude and energetic, Bill Duke's "A Rage in Harlem" recalls the somewhat ambivalent days of the early '70s when, however briefly and for whatever motivation, black culture moved to the center of American film culture in the violent urban genre known generally as "blaxploitation.""A Rage in Harlem," of course, has a tonier pedigree than "Above 125th" or "Skipchaser" or any of the works of Jim Brown, Fred Williamson, Richard Roundtree or Isaac Hayes; it has a literary antecedent, sharing the best of the blaxploitation pictures' derivation from the works of Chester Himes, a novelist who exiled himself to Paris where he wrote vibrant police procedurals set in Harlem and featuring two tough cops, Coffin Ed Johnson and Gravedigger Jones.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 3, 1991
Whatever Imabelle wants, Imabelle gets.No man could deny Imabelle her druthers.She's poured into that hourglass red dress like hydraulic fluid under 10,000 pounds of pressure p.s.i. Hubba-hubba and va-vooom.Robin Givens, who plays Imabelle, laughs."I just kind of went for it," she says.The role, in "A Rage in Harlem," may make the television actress a major motion picture star. She's already gotten an el-ravo plug from Liz Smith and great reviews all around the country.The film, in fact, has been chosen for competition in the Cannes Film Festival, and Givens will be in attendance.
NEWS
By New York Daily News | February 7, 1992
INDIANAPOLIS -- Mike Tyson's money and lust were no secret to the 18-year-old beauty pageant contestant who alleges he raped her last summer, according to the testimony of four pageant contestants.As Mr. Tyson's rape trial resumed after a one-day disruption, two Miss Black America pageant contestants testified yesterday that the ex-champ's accuser seemed more interested in his cash than his company.Madelyn Whittington, a pageant contestant from Milwaukee, said she saw Mr. Tyson's accuser in the restroom after Mr. Tyson had met the woman at a pageant rehearsal.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | February 12, 1992
INDIANAPOLIS -- Probation authorities say they would call Mike Tyson's ex-wife, actress Robin Givens, in compiling a sentencing report before the boxer is sentenced March 6 on rape charges."
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