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NEWS
August 30, 1996
WHEN POLICE threaten to arrest agents of Carroll County's most powerful developer for trespass, it's clear the issue is bigger than details of building plans. At Roberts Field subdivision in Hampstead, there's a long list of community disputes with developer Martin K. P. Hill, from ownership to housing density to open space.The conflict came to a head this week when workers for the developer were blocked from constructing a storm-water basin on land owned by the Fields Homeowners' Association.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 18, 2008
Robert E. Fields Sr., a noted Baltimore jazz pianist and composer who during his nearly six-decade career played in such venues as the Prime Rib, Belvedere Hotel and the old Chesapeake Restaurant, died Monday of bladder cancer at his Hamilton home. He was 80. Mr. Fields was born in Baltimore and raised in the Plymouth Road home where he had lived since 1940. "He was 8 when he started playing the piano," said his wife of 53 years, the former Joan Schumacher. "His father was leery of buying him a piano, so he practiced for a year on a next-door neighbor's piano until [his father]
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NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Darren Allen and Cindy Parr and Darren Allen,Staff writers | September 18, 1991
It sounded like a recession success story -- less than a year after construction was completed, amid central Maryland's worst economic climate in a decade, the Roberts Field Shopping Center along Route 30 here was more than 75 percent leased.The 81,000-square-foot center, completed in April and owned by Columbia-based McGill Development Ltd., cost more than $8 million to build.But despite having a major grocery, national hardware, video retailer, liquor store, pizza shop and six other enterprises under its farmhouse-inspired roof, Roberts Field's developers in July filed for protection under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.
NEWS
December 30, 2003
Donald E. Roberts, a retired International Business Machine field engineer and avid world traveler, died of Lewy body disease, a dementia-related condition, Dec. 23 at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The Towson resident was 77. Mr. Roberts was born and raised in Easton, Pa., where he also attended Lafayette College. A radar specialist, he served in the Navy from 1945 to 1946, and was recalled to active duty during the Korean War. Mr. Roberts began his career in the 1950s with IBM in Poughkeepsie, N.Y. He later held various positions with the company in Europe and Silver Spring.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1999
In the wake of public opposition and an internal squabble, the Hampstead Town Council made no decision last night on a proposed compromise with developers that would allow 66 instead of 90 condominium units to be built in the Roberts Field development.Councilman Wayne H. Thomas opposed dropping the appeal, noting that the town has invested much time and $42,000 in trying to keep builder Martin K. P. Hill and Woodhaven Building and Development Inc. from cramming 90 units into Roberts Field, the last phase of the development east of Route 30 and south of Lower Beckleysville Road.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1996
Two Hampstead men, including the son of a former town police officer, have been charged with coercing two juveniles into stealing furniture for their condominium.Hampstead police said Bryan Keith Steimetz, 18, and Curtis Allen Meeks, 18, are responsible for a rash of thefts last month in the Roberts Field development, in which lawn furniture, a grill and a basketball hoop were stolen.Steimetz's father is Paul N. Steimetz, who resigned from the Hampstead police force last year after marijuana and drug paraphernalia were found in his home.
SPORTS
September 10, 1996
Bryan Owen's goal on a feed from Mike Uleckas 39 seconds into the second overtime period lifted visiting and ninth-ranked Chesapeake to a 3-2 victory over No. 10 Severna Park last night at Roberts Field.The victory was Chesapeake's fourth straight over Falcons.Pub Date: 9/10/96
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | November 14, 1990
HAMPSTEAD - They don't do much shopping these days at the Hampstead Village Shopping Center.The Black Rock Road strip mall -- formerly the home of a small grocery store, a video rental shop and a pizza parlor -- has been vacant for more than year now, a year in which retail growth elsewhere in town has been steady.Fast-food restaurants, convenience stores and small businesses have been built, boosting Hampstead's property tax base and economic well-being.It is that economic growth that the Columbia-based developers of Roberts Field Shopping Center -- now taking shape less than a mile from the empty Hampstead Village -- are banking on."
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | March 27, 1991
The town's water supply is caught in the undercurrent as Black & Decker U.S. Inc. and the owners of the Roberts Field Shopping Center tryto iron out legal responsibility for possible water contamination.Hampstead may have to stop pumping water out of two of its 12 working wells unless the shopping center agrees to allow two monitoring wells on its property.The wells would be designed to detect any contamination from the nearby Black & Decker plant before it reaches drinking water supplies.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | January 12, 1994
Wayne Thomas, president of the Fields Homeowners' Association in Hampstead, said he thinks its members have been wrongly saddled with maintenance costs for storm water management facilities on association property.Mr. Thomas, who is also a member of the Hampstead Town Council, said that under a Hampstead law that was in effect until last March, the developer should have been responsible for the facilities until they could be deeded to the town.The facilities include a pond that contains water all of the time, ponds that hold water only after a storm, drains and undeveloped areas set aside for channeling storm water to the ponds.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1999
In the wake of public opposition and an internal squabble, the Hampstead Town Council made no decision last night on a proposed compromise with developers that would allow 66 instead of 90 condominium units to be built in the Roberts Field development.Councilman Wayne H. Thomas opposed dropping the appeal, noting that the town has invested much time and $42,000 in trying to keep builder Martin K. P. Hill and Woodhaven Building and Development Inc. from cramming 90 units into Roberts Field, the last phase of the development east of Route 30 and south of Lower Beckleysville Road.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | February 8, 1999
Hoping to avoid further legal expenses, Hampstead officials will hold a public hearing tomorrow on a proposal to allow developers to build 66 rather than 90 condominiums in Roberts Field.The town sought to halt construction of the condominiums by builder Martin K. P. Hill and Woodhaven Building and Development Inc. in 1996. A final construction permit was denied, mainly because of concerns about open space and density.That permit would have allowed Hill and Woodhaven to complete the last phase of the Roberts Field development, located east of Route 30 and south of Lower Beckleysville Road.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 18, 1996
WHAT GIFT COSTS nothing but is worth more than gold? The gift of a blood donation takes precious few minutes, yet can help save the life of another.From 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. Dec. 30, the American Red Cross will take blood donations at Hampstead's fire hall. Each donation not only benefits the donor and his or her family but also the Hampstead community.To encourage more people to donate blood, Lana Fuller, a nurse with the American Red Cross, came up with a special blood-donor account for members of the Roberts Field Homeowners Association.
SPORTS
September 10, 1996
Bryan Owen's goal on a feed from Mike Uleckas 39 seconds into the second overtime period lifted visiting and ninth-ranked Chesapeake to a 3-2 victory over No. 10 Severna Park last night at Roberts Field.The victory was Chesapeake's fourth straight over Falcons.Pub Date: 9/10/96
NEWS
August 30, 1996
WHEN POLICE threaten to arrest agents of Carroll County's most powerful developer for trespass, it's clear the issue is bigger than details of building plans. At Roberts Field subdivision in Hampstead, there's a long list of community disputes with developer Martin K. P. Hill, from ownership to housing density to open space.The conflict came to a head this week when workers for the developer were blocked from constructing a storm-water basin on land owned by the Fields Homeowners' Association.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1996
Two Hampstead men, including the son of a former town police officer, have been charged with coercing two juveniles into stealing furniture for their condominium.Hampstead police said Bryan Keith Steimetz, 18, and Curtis Allen Meeks, 18, are responsible for a rash of thefts last month in the Roberts Field development, in which lawn furniture, a grill and a basketball hoop were stolen.Steimetz's father is Paul N. Steimetz, who resigned from the Hampstead police force last year after marijuana and drug paraphernalia were found in his home.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | January 19, 1995
One well in Hampstead is contaminated with nitrates, but town drinking water is not affected, officials said yesterday."There is no health risk," Mayor C. Clinton Becker said. "The water is safe to drink."Well No. 23, on the east side of Boxwood Drive north of North Woods Trail in the Roberts Field subdivision, was closed Jan. 12, Assistant Town Manager Leonard Bohager said.Town officials discovered the well was contaminated during a Dec. 27 test, he said.Residents were never in danger because water from the polluted well was mixed with water from 11 other wells and so was diluted before being distributed, Mr. Bohager said.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | May 13, 1992
HAMPSTEAD -- Where he once saw green, Jim Eskew isseeing red.The view from his backyard was a lush row of old trees, but now he looks out onto a sea of town houses.Tempers are flaring at the Roberts Field subdivision at the south end of town, where Eskew and his neighbors on Trapper Court are mourning the loss of 15 to 20 trees that developer Martin K. P. Hill had chopped down last week.Hill said the trees interfered with grading the hill to build condominiums or apartments."It takes so long for trees to mature," said Barbara Thomas, Eskew's neighbor.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 10, 1996
ABOUT A DOZEN teen-agers from Robert's Field made short work of a half-dozen pizzas at a thank-you party at J & P Pizza March 31. The teens have performed a combined 313 hours of community service in the Robert's Field community and elsewhere in Hampstead.Enjoying slices of pizza in reward for their efforts were Mike Neal, Brian Fitzgerald, Sam, John and Daniel Pollock, Joe and Dana Centineo, Angela Smith, Terry Wilkinson, and Amy and Jennifer Malcolm. James and Jarrod Davis could not attend the party.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 20, 1995
DECKING THE home with a mantle of electric bulbs is a pleasure of the holidays that has caught on in the Hampstead community of Robert's Field. Many of the residents there turn the more than 600 homes into holiday greeting cards to be seen day and night.This annual, totally voluntary festival of decoration is applauded by the Robert's Field Homeowners Association, which sponsors awards to recognize the best decoration efforts. Awards are given only to those who haven't won an award in the previous five years.
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