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Roberto Baggio

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SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | July 16, 1994
TORRANCE, Calif. -- Maybe he should change his first name to "Other."That's how Italy's latest soccer star, Dino Baggio, 22, often has been described during World Cup '94. He's, oops, the "wrong one."The right one is teammate Roberto Baggio, the flamboyant forward with the undersized body, unmatched game-breaking ability and the most recognized ponytail in the sports world.Dino Baggio is a tall (6 feet 1) midfielder, has short-cropped hair and doesn't talk much. As recently as a month ago, fans said he did not deserve a spot on the national team.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Leary and Mike Leary,Special to the Sun | May 9, 1999
"The Miracle of Castel di Sangro," by Joe McGinniss. Little, Brown. 416 pages. $25.Well into this story of a provincial soccer team that improbably scaled the heights of the sport in a land where il calcio has a more devoted following than Catholicism, I began thinking I had mistakenly picked up a Giovanni Guareschi novel. Was I reading one of those charming and humorous Don Camillo-type tales of eccentric but lovable Italian villagers?"I had come to the Abruzzo to write a beautiful story about wonderful, humble people who had dared to dream and who'd then seen their dream become reality," proclaims the author.
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SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | July 17, 1994
PASADENA, Calif. -- It has been a great run. Large crowds. A few upsets. Some new stars arrived, some old ones faded. TV ratings were higher than expected, and so was the scoring. Millions of dollars were added to this nation's economy, and the U.S. national team may have had its own coming-out party.And now the climax.It's Brazil vs. Italy today at the Rose Bowl, with gorgeous &L mountainsserving as a backdrop to the international flavor of Europe mixing it up with South America.The world's biggest sporting event will feature some of the game's biggest names.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | July 17, 1994
PASADENA, Calif. -- It has been a great run. Large crowds. A few upsets. Some new stars arrived, some old ones faded. TV ratings were higher than expected, and so was the scoring. Millions of dollars were added to this nation's economy, and the U.S. national team may have had its own coming-out party.And now the climax.It's Brazil vs. Italy today at the Rose Bowl, with gorgeous &L mountainsserving as a backdrop to the international flavor of Europe mixing it up with South America.The world's biggest sporting event will feature some of the game's biggest names.
SPORTS
By Bill Plaschke and Bill Plaschke,Los Angeles Times | July 13, 1994
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- The Italians realize it is no longer luck.Forget the short-handed victory over Norway, the last-minute escapes against Nigeria and Spain.When Roberto Baggio performed his goal-celebrating somersault Saturday and landed on his feet, they knew."We now feel we have a duty to take this thing all the way to the end," said Italy's goalkeeper, Gianluca Pagliuca.But look what just wandered into their path for today's World Cup semifinal at Giants Stadium.What did they say their name was?
SPORTS
By Jerry Trecker and Jerry Trecker,The Hartford Courant | July 14, 1994
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- In an atmosphere so remarkably different from that night in Napoli four years ago, Italy created a brilliant scene yesterday at Giants Stadium.First, the Italians wiped away the memory of that bitter semifinal loss to Argentina in 1990 before a crowd that alternately cheered and jeered them. It was a surreal setting that had as much to do with the regional animosities in Italian politics as with what was happening on the field. Failure to reach the 1990 final at home cannot be completely erased by reaching the championship game four years later, but the way Italy played yesterday at the Meadowlands will restore some of the pride.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | June 24, 1994
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- Italy coach Arrigo Sacchi escaped Egil Olsen's kiss of death yesterday.Legend has it that seven coaches have been fired after losing to Olsen, who coaches Norway, and Sacchi was a serious candidate to become No. 8 before yesterday's World Cup match.Sacchi has faced criticism during the past month for not having enough offense. Then his team lost the tournament opener to Ireland. And then his goalkeeper was ejected early yesterday, his star player was hampered by a hamstring injury and Italy had to play nearly 70 minutes with 10 players.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Leary and Mike Leary,Special to the Sun | May 9, 1999
"The Miracle of Castel di Sangro," by Joe McGinniss. Little, Brown. 416 pages. $25.Well into this story of a provincial soccer team that improbably scaled the heights of the sport in a land where il calcio has a more devoted following than Catholicism, I began thinking I had mistakenly picked up a Giovanni Guareschi novel. Was I reading one of those charming and humorous Don Camillo-type tales of eccentric but lovable Italian villagers?"I had come to the Abruzzo to write a beautiful story about wonderful, humble people who had dared to dream and who'd then seen their dream become reality," proclaims the author.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | July 15, 1994
FULLERTON, Calif. -- One day Romario is bolting to the sidelines, swinging his arms and rocking an imaginary baby. Another day he is pumping a clenched fist in the air, or hoisting up the No. 1 finger in front of the Brazilian crowds. Sometimes he moonwalks, and other times he struts.Romario acts like he owns the World Cup.Maybe because he does.Thus far, World Cup '94 has been Romario's Cup."Yes, I remember saying this would be Romario's Cup," said Romario, sounding a bit embarrassed about his prediction.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | July 18, 1994
PASADENA, Calif. -- There were finally tears of joy, ones that are shared by an entire nation.Brazil ended its 24-year drought in the world's most prestigious sporting event with a 3-2 shootout win over Italy after 120 scoreless minutes in the World Cup championship yesterday before a crowd of 94,194 at the Rose Bowl.The win gave Brazil an unprecedented fourth World Cup title out of 15 tournaments, and may have silenced the Brazilian fans who have criticized coach Carlos Alberto Parreira for playing gritty defense instead of the traditional "samba" style of offensive soccer.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | July 16, 1994
TORRANCE, Calif. -- Maybe he should change his first name to "Other."That's how Italy's latest soccer star, Dino Baggio, 22, often has been described during World Cup '94. He's, oops, the "wrong one."The right one is teammate Roberto Baggio, the flamboyant forward with the undersized body, unmatched game-breaking ability and the most recognized ponytail in the sports world.Dino Baggio is a tall (6 feet 1) midfielder, has short-cropped hair and doesn't talk much. As recently as a month ago, fans said he did not deserve a spot on the national team.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | July 15, 1994
FULLERTON, Calif. -- One day Romario is bolting to the sidelines, swinging his arms and rocking an imaginary baby. Another day he is pumping a clenched fist in the air, or hoisting up the No. 1 finger in front of the Brazilian crowds. Sometimes he moonwalks, and other times he struts.Romario acts like he owns the World Cup.Maybe because he does.Thus far, World Cup '94 has been Romario's Cup."Yes, I remember saying this would be Romario's Cup," said Romario, sounding a bit embarrassed about his prediction.
SPORTS
By Jerry Trecker and Jerry Trecker,The Hartford Courant | July 14, 1994
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- In an atmosphere so remarkably different from that night in Napoli four years ago, Italy created a brilliant scene yesterday at Giants Stadium.First, the Italians wiped away the memory of that bitter semifinal loss to Argentina in 1990 before a crowd that alternately cheered and jeered them. It was a surreal setting that had as much to do with the regional animosities in Italian politics as with what was happening on the field. Failure to reach the 1990 final at home cannot be completely erased by reaching the championship game four years later, but the way Italy played yesterday at the Meadowlands will restore some of the pride.
SPORTS
By Bill Plaschke and Bill Plaschke,Los Angeles Times | July 13, 1994
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- The Italians realize it is no longer luck.Forget the short-handed victory over Norway, the last-minute escapes against Nigeria and Spain.When Roberto Baggio performed his goal-celebrating somersault Saturday and landed on his feet, they knew."We now feel we have a duty to take this thing all the way to the end," said Italy's goalkeeper, Gianluca Pagliuca.But look what just wandered into their path for today's World Cup semifinal at Giants Stadium.What did they say their name was?
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | June 24, 1994
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- Italy coach Arrigo Sacchi escaped Egil Olsen's kiss of death yesterday.Legend has it that seven coaches have been fired after losing to Olsen, who coaches Norway, and Sacchi was a serious candidate to become No. 8 before yesterday's World Cup match.Sacchi has faced criticism during the past month for not having enough offense. Then his team lost the tournament opener to Ireland. And then his goalkeeper was ejected early yesterday, his star player was hampered by a hamstring injury and Italy had to play nearly 70 minutes with 10 players.
SPORTS
June 23, 1998
Results: Romania 2, England 1; Colombia 1, Tunisia 0Star of the day: Tunisia goalkeeper Chokri El Ouaer made 11 saves, several of them spectacular, and cleared a few more errant balls in the 1-0 loss to Colombia.Footnote: Michael Owen became the youngest player to score a World Cup goal for England. The 18-year-old tied the game with Romania in the 83rd minute, but the Romanians won it seven minutes later.Homeward-bound: South Africa midfielders Brendan Augustine and Naughty Mokoena were sent home by the team as punishment for staying out partying until dawn Sunday.
NEWS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | July 18, 1994
PASADENA, Calif. -- It was the World Cup '94 championship, American-style.The United States may not be on par with the rest of the world when it comes to soccer, but Americans sure can throw one grand farewell party.A crowd of 94,194 packed the Rose Bowl yesterday and watched Brazil defeat Italy in the first shootout to decide a World Cup title. After 120 minutes of scoreless soccer, Brazil made three penalty kicks to Italy's two."We had such confidence that the thought of losing the penalty shootout never crossed our mind," Brazil's Bebeto said.
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